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I am wondering if I can use few Raspberry Pi's in a stack in order to mine crypto currencies.

It seems there are two types of currencies:

  • Ones for which a CPU is powerful enough for mining (few, very few of them) and
  • Ones that need GPU power

I want to mine the second type, because they are more effective, and the maths look better.

There are a few things which I want you guys to help me with. It is very important how much power will this stack consume, how it will be cooled, and if using Raspberry Pi will be the most effective way to mine those coins, or to choose another config?

I like Rasberry Pi because they can be very compact.

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Related: Is it possible to mine Bitcoins? –  Jivings Feb 14 at 19:16
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1 Answer

I didn't try it myself but, from reading from different sources, it seems to be inefficient. Sources are at the end.

For litecoin based currencies, a Rpi mines from aproximatly 0.20 to 0.40 kH/s. It's really low and you could easily have a graphic card 1000x more efficient for the price of 10 Rpi. Check this link for more information about hardware performance when mining.

Bitecoin mining with a Rpi is mainly done in conjunction with other devices, the pi serving only to monitor/control these devices. From Raspberry pi website:

"The Pi on its own isn’t an efficient Bitcoin miner; some people are using it as one, but more as an example of how mining works and a bit of a novelty than as a genuine way to raise funds.".

Sources:

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This actually fits pretty well as an answer if you add some details instead of just linking. –  jandjorgensen Feb 17 at 23:15
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You're right, I'll try to develop it. –  Gagaro Feb 18 at 8:25
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