2 Information on ShiftPWM for Arduino added.
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If you prefer a ready-made solution, Gerben's suggestion in a comment to use a PCA9685 is an excellent. Apparently, Adafruit offers an affordable PCA9685 breakout board.

Alternatively, an Arduino (or just an ATMega8), which you could control from the Raspberry via SPI or I2C, might be used to generate the PWM signals and drive the MOSFETs.


EDIT: Gerben made a good point that 1 Arduino alone is not able to generate the number (5-10 or more) of independent PWM signals in hardware and that it's therefore necessary to implement that in software.

I realize that this is not arduino.stackexchange.com, but it might be worth mentioning that ShiftPWM, using an Arduino and a bunch of 74HC595 shift registers might do the job once the MOSFETs are added.

If you prefer a ready-made solution, Gerben's suggestion in a comment to use a PCA9685 is an excellent. Apparently, Adafruit offers an affordable PCA9685 breakout board.

Alternatively, an Arduino (or just an ATMega8), which you could control from the Raspberry via SPI or I2C, might be used to generate the PWM signals and drive the MOSFETs.

If you prefer a ready-made solution, Gerben's suggestion in a comment to use a PCA9685 is an excellent. Apparently, Adafruit offers an affordable PCA9685 breakout board.

Alternatively, an Arduino (or just an ATMega8), which you could control from the Raspberry via SPI or I2C, might be used to generate the PWM signals and drive the MOSFETs.


EDIT: Gerben made a good point that 1 Arduino alone is not able to generate the number (5-10 or more) of independent PWM signals in hardware and that it's therefore necessary to implement that in software.

I realize that this is not arduino.stackexchange.com, but it might be worth mentioning that ShiftPWM, using an Arduino and a bunch of 74HC595 shift registers might do the job once the MOSFETs are added.

1
source | link

If you prefer a ready-made solution, Gerben's suggestion in a comment to use a PCA9685 is an excellent. Apparently, Adafruit offers an affordable PCA9685 breakout board.

Alternatively, an Arduino (or just an ATMega8), which you could control from the Raspberry via SPI or I2C, might be used to generate the PWM signals and drive the MOSFETs.