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The problem is that the image is a complete disk image including a partition table, not an image of an individual partition.

Theres a couple of ways round this, one way is to calculate an offset and use that for mounting (see alex's answer for more details).

Another way if you have a recent kernel and a recent version of losetup is to use the -P option to losetup e.g.

losetup -P -f <filename>

this will create a series of device nodes. The main /dev/looploop<number> node and also nodes for each partition at /dev/loopploop<number>p<number> . You can then work with the device like any other paritioned device.

When you have finished you can remove the loopback device with

losetup -d /dev/looploop<number>

The problem is that the image is a complete disk image including a partition table, not an image of an individual partition.

Theres a couple of ways round this, one way is to calculate an offset and use that for mounting (see alex's answer for more details).

Another way if you have a recent kernel and a recent version of losetup is to use the -P option to losetup e.g.

losetup -P -f

this will create a series of device nodes. The main /dev/loop node and also nodes for each partition at /dev/loopp . You can then work with the device like any other paritioned device.

When you have finished you can remove the loopback device with

losetup -d /dev/loop

The problem is that the image is a complete disk image including a partition table, not an image of an individual partition.

Theres a couple of ways round this, one way is to calculate an offset and use that for mounting (see alex's answer for more details).

Another way if you have a recent kernel and a recent version of losetup is to use the -P option to losetup e.g.

losetup -P -f <filename>

this will create a series of device nodes. The main /dev/loop<number> node and also nodes for each partition at /dev/loop<number>p<number> . You can then work with the device like any other paritioned device.

When you have finished you can remove the loopback device with

losetup -d /dev/loop<number>

1
source | link

The problem is that the image is a complete disk image including a partition table, not an image of an individual partition.

Theres a couple of ways round this, one way is to calculate an offset and use that for mounting (see alex's answer for more details).

Another way if you have a recent kernel and a recent version of losetup is to use the -P option to losetup e.g.

losetup -P -f

this will create a series of device nodes. The main /dev/loop node and also nodes for each partition at /dev/loopp . You can then work with the device like any other paritioned device.

When you have finished you can remove the loopback device with

losetup -d /dev/loop