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Ground in a DC circuit refers to either an actual earth ground (i.e., 0 volts vs. anything) or a common ground for different components that may be working at pretty much any voltage relative to it.

I think what you would really want to be concerned with on the Pi is the amperage, if the "common ground" to the Pi is the primary ground for whatever you are connecting -- but it is hard to imagine how an arrangement like that is possible without intending to do so and jumping through hoops to accomplish it. My point here is if you wanted to fry the Pi that way you probably could, but only if you actually wanted to (by shorting a high amperage supply to ground through it).

Anyway, a common ground between between circuits running at different voltages is finea common ground between between circuits running at different voltages is fine (and necessary, if there is any other connection between them). This doesn't automatically make every circuit using it safe, it just means that using a common ground doesn't by definition make it unsafe.

Ground in a DC circuit refers to either an actual earth ground (i.e., 0 volts vs. anything) or a common ground for different components that may be working at pretty much any voltage relative to it.

I think what you would really want to be concerned with on the Pi is the amperage, if the "common ground" to the Pi is the primary ground for whatever you are connecting -- but it is hard to imagine how an arrangement like that is possible without intending to do so and jumping through hoops to accomplish it. My point here is if you wanted to fry the Pi that way you probably could, but only if you actually wanted to (by shorting a high amperage supply to ground through it).

Anyway, a common ground between between circuits running at different voltages is fine (and necessary, if there is any other connection between them). This doesn't automatically make every circuit using safe, it just means that using a common ground doesn't by definition make it unsafe.

Ground in a DC circuit refers to either an actual earth ground (i.e., 0 volts vs. anything) or a common ground for different components that may be working at pretty much any voltage relative to it.

I think what you would really want to be concerned with on the Pi is the amperage, if the "common ground" to the Pi is the primary ground for whatever you are connecting -- but it is hard to imagine how an arrangement like that is possible without intending to do so and jumping through hoops to accomplish it. My point here is if you wanted to fry the Pi that way you probably could, but only if you actually wanted to (by shorting a high amperage supply to ground through it).

Anyway, a common ground between between circuits running at different voltages is fine (and necessary, if there is any other connection between them). This doesn't automatically make every circuit using it safe, it just means that using a common ground doesn't by definition make it unsafe.

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Ground in a DC circuit refers to either an actual earth ground (i.e., 0 volts vs. anything) or a common ground for different components that may be working at pretty much any voltage relative to it.

I think what you would really want to be concerned with on the Pi is the amperage, if the "common ground" to the Pi is the primary ground for whatever you are connecting -- but it is hard to imagine how an arrangement like that is possible without intending to do so and jumping through hoops to accomplish it. My point here is if you wanted to fry the Pi that way you probably could, but only if you actually wanted to (by shorting a high amperage supply to ground through it).

Anyway, a common ground between between circuits running at different voltages is fine (and necessary, if there is any other connection between them). This doesn't automatically make every circuit using safe, it just means that using a common ground doesn't by definition make it unsafe.

Ground in a DC circuit refers to either an actual earth ground (i.e., 0 volts vs. anything) or a common ground for different components that may be working at pretty much any voltage relative to it.

I think what you would really want to be concerned with on the Pi is the amperage, if the "common ground" to the Pi is the primary ground for whatever you are connecting -- but it is hard to imagine how an arrangement like that is possible without intending to do so and jumping through hoops to accomplish it. My point here is if you wanted to fry the Pi that way you probably could, but only if you actually wanted to.

Anyway, a common ground between between circuits running at different voltages is fine (and necessary, if there is any other connection between them). This doesn't automatically make every circuit using safe, it just means that using a common ground doesn't by definition make it unsafe.

Ground in a DC circuit refers to either an actual earth ground (i.e., 0 volts vs. anything) or a common ground for different components that may be working at pretty much any voltage relative to it.

I think what you would really want to be concerned with on the Pi is the amperage, if the "common ground" to the Pi is the primary ground for whatever you are connecting -- but it is hard to imagine how an arrangement like that is possible without intending to do so and jumping through hoops to accomplish it. My point here is if you wanted to fry the Pi that way you probably could, but only if you actually wanted to (by shorting a high amperage supply to ground through it).

Anyway, a common ground between between circuits running at different voltages is fine (and necessary, if there is any other connection between them). This doesn't automatically make every circuit using safe, it just means that using a common ground doesn't by definition make it unsafe.

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Ground in a DC circuit refers to either an actual earth ground (i.e., 0 volts vs. anything) or a common ground for different components that may be working at pretty much any voltage relative to it.

I think what you would really want to be concerned with on the Pi is the amperage, if the "common ground" to the Pi is the primary ground for whatever you are connecting -- but it is hard to imagine how an arrangement like that is possible without intending to do so and jumping through hoops to accomplish it. My point here is if you wanted to fry the Pi that way you probably could, but only if you actually wanted to.

Anyway, a common ground between between circuits running at different voltages is fine (and necessary, if there is any other connection between them). This doesn't automatically make every circuit using safe, it just means that using a common ground doesn't by definition make it unsafe.