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I ordered a few Raspberry Pi 4s, still under way, each with their own power supply, and I plan to get more, but when I have been previously able to power RPis with USB-hub, there's apparently no USB-C-hubs, beyond few expensive 2 usb-c-port-hubs, in the existance:

https://superuser.com/questions/1381139/why-cant-i-find-a-usb-c-hub-with-multiple-usb-c-ports

So is the only option hoping to find some slim enough 5V/3A/15W USB-C charger for each RPi4 and plugging those into extension cords?

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The official Power Requirements of the Pi 4B is 5v, 3.0A - I.e. a total of 15W maximum power requirement from each of the Pis, so a 60W USB power supply, or larger, would be ideal. This is a maximum, as they acknowledge with:

We recommend a 2.5A (2500mA) power supply, from a reputable retailer, that will provide you with enough power to run your Raspberry Pi for most applications, including use of the 4 USB ports.

This month, I have built a 4 board Hadoop/Spark cluster following this guide.

I looked at the possibility of buying a PC Power Supply but for a 4-Pi cluster, that seemed like overkill and would generate a clunky solution.

To power it, I bought an Anker 63W 5-port USB Charger and 30cm USB to USB-C cables. There's no need for a USB-C hub and, as you point out, they don't exist in any case.

It's true, that only two of the sockets are rated at 3.0A, the others are described as 2.4A, but even with the draw from the fans that came as part of the cluster case (5V 0.2A) the cluster works perfectly well. I am running them headless and won't be having any external peripherals so I don't foresee any power issues with this setup.

enter image description here

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Here is what you can do. Open a casing of a desktop PC. You will find a PSU. That PSU is called SMPS. Now go to a store and find that PSU. Grab it(of course after buying) and come home. Short the green line with black and power the SMPS. Find the 5 volt line with 5V-15A power and split that line into many USB type-C cable.

Buy a 5 volt 15 A power source

Or use 3 or 4 ,5V-3A BEC with 12 volt LiPo battery to power your boards.

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    Ah, your PSU grabbing story is interesting. That is what I used to power my Arduinos. I did not short the green wire to ground. Instead, I extracted the green wire outside and used it as a touch button power switch. Actually I also used the other powers of the Desktop PC 12V ATX PSU: 3V3, 5V0, 12V. – tlfong01 Oct 31 '19 at 5:22
  • How do you split into multiple USB-C cables? which wires should be used? – FarO Jan 16 at 8:42
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Los Alamos labs looked at powering a huge cluster of RPi to cheaply simulate their supercomputer cluster . Out of that came the Bitscope blades which will mount 4 Rpi per blade and host IIRC ten blades in a single rack.

It might be worth a look. Each blade is capable of delivering up to 4A current and is compatible with DC power sources ranging from 9V to 48V.

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Buy a USB hub for charging (Anker, Belkin, etc.) and use that. No need to go all the way to the wall for multiple PIs.

This guy built an interesting stack including a USB powered network hub. https://makezine.com/projects/build-a-compact-4-node-raspberry-pi-cluster/

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  • The link you provided is 5 years outdated and uses micro USB connectors! And the OP told there is no cheep USB type C hub. So what? – Ingo Feb 16 at 20:50
  • Yea, you make a good point. The original question was about USB-C hubs. However, I'm not sure you need all USB-C to power your PIs. Buy a simple USB charging hub as the post mentions (and my answer) and buy a few USB -> USB-C cables and you're done. I've got a USB charging hub powering two 4Bs and one 2B. I got the hub and three cables for ~ $40 USD. Seems reasonable. – SprocketRocket Feb 17 at 21:22

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