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https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-compute-module-4/

The new Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 and its IO board has the 2-lane and 4-lane MIPI CSI camera port, but I am not really sure what the difference is. Would I be able to use two cameras simultaneously with this board?

https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/hardware/computemodule/cmio-camera.md

Also, if you look at how the cameras are connected in the picture in the above website, it seems to have some kind of adaptor. Can you please help me identify what it is?

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  • You are aware that the info in the second link is about the CM3x and CM3 IO board?
    – Dirk
    Oct 23 '20 at 15:49
  • @Dirk Yes I am.
    – user126160
    Oct 23 '20 at 17:02
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4 lane allows a higher data rate from the sensor, but only if the sensor and the board it's mounted on supports the extra lanes. None of the official raspberry pi cameras do, though I think there may be some third party 4-lane sensors available. None of the regular Pi models support 4 lane, only the compute module does and only on one of the two ports.

Regarding connectors, the compute module devkits (at least the original and CM3 devkits, but i'm pretty sure CM4 is the same) and the zero use a different connector with a finer pitch and more pins from the regular Pi models.

In terms of connecting raspberry pi camera modules to the compute module IO boards you can either use the adapter boards sold specifically for the purpose ( https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/raspberry-pi/1363742/ ) or you can use the special flat-flex cables cables sold for use with the Pi zero https://thepihut.com/products/raspberry-pi-zero-camera-adapter.

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  • Wow thank you so much! This is exactly what I wanted to know. 4 lane port can also be used for the 2-lane sensors, right?
    – user126160
    Oct 25 '20 at 2:14
  • Yes both ports can be used in 2 lane mode. Oct 25 '20 at 2:42

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