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I am powering 3 different sensor (a temperature sensor, an IR transmitter and an IR receiver) on my Pi. I would like to use the same 5V pin to power all three.

I connected a jumper onto the 5v pin, and then split the cable into 3 by soldering them together.

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Questions:

  1. Is this a bad idea?

  2. Is there a better way of doing this? (See: a pre-made little thing that will do the trick, 1 cable becomes 3, female to male or female to female) Surely lots of people will connect multiple sensors -- there are only 2 5V supplies, and surely people will have 3, 4, 5 sensors often enough?

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  • There is only a single 5v supply, but has two pins to make it easier to connect to.
    – NomadMaker
    Jun 23 at 13:02
  • I know. I actually have three very low power devices to connect. I just wanted to simplify the question! I now understand why there are only 5v pins -- normally, prototype boards are made on breadboards, which will make it easy. Or, will make a proper circuit. I just so happen to need a Pi with 3 sensors effectively flying around...
    – Merc
    2 days ago

2 Answers 2

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Questions:
Is this a bad idea?
Is there a better way of doing this? (See: a pre-made little thing that will do the trick, 1 cable becomes 3, female to male or female to female) Surely lots of people will connect multiple sensors -- there are only 2 5V supplies, and surely people will have 3, 4, 5 sensors often enough?

  1. The only thing that could make this a Bad Idea is if you're drawing too much current. The number of wires matters not at all - other than perhaps the messiness factor.

  2. If you are using a solderless breadboard, they typically have rails that run the entire length of the breadboard.

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Looks like a good idea to share the power pin to me. It's what I do myself when I want multiple grounds or multiple power lines (and don't want to use a breadboard with its power rails).

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