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Since my Pi4B is running headless with a power cable only being connected to WiFi, I am puzzled by where I can see the fsck log I normally see shortly on-screen on my desktop Linux machine while booting?

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  • You can check the dmesg log. The dmesg command prints the message buffer of the kernel, which includes boot-time messages. bash
    – liaifat85
    Commented Jul 1 at 6:23
  • @liaifat85 I believe you are incorrect. Could you prove me wrong -- post an answer please. Commented Jul 1 at 8:06

1 Answer 1

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As root or with sudo you may read it in the following file:

/run/initramfs/fsck.log

Clean state will not trigger fsck check though, so this output is normal:

Log of fsck -C -y -V -t ext4 /dev/mmcblk0p2 
Thu Jan  1 00:00:05 1970

fsck from util-linux 2.38.1
[/sbin/fsck.ext4 (1) -- /dev/mmcblk0p2] fsck.ext4 -y -C0 /dev/mmcblk0p2 
e2fsck 1.47.0 (5-Feb-2023)
RASPIROOT: clean, 35030/3753344 files, 741631/15460864 blocks

Thu Jan  1 00:00:05 1970
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but, of course, you can force it if you wish by adding/adjusting the fsck.mode= kernel parameter to force, normally it's on auto in the /boot/firmware/cmdline.txt file.

Example forced-fsck log:

Log of fsck -C -f -y -V -t ext4 /dev/mmcblk0p2 
Thu Jan  1 00:00:05 1970

fsck from util-linux 2.38.1
[/sbin/fsck.ext4 (1) -- /dev/mmcblk0p2] fsck.ext4 -f -y -C0 /dev/mmcblk0p2 
e2fsck 1.47.0 (5-Feb-2023)
Pass 1: Checking inodes, blocks, and sizes
Pass 2: Checking directory structure
Pass 3: Checking directory connectivity
Pass 4: Checking reference counts
Pass 5: Checking group summary information
RASPIROOT: 35028/3753344 files (0.3% non-contiguous), 738594/15460864 blocks

Thu Jan  1 00:00:07 1970
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