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So i was working on a project in which I had to use an ADC. I used WiringPi's Python modules to do so. For testing the ADC, I attached a 100k pot to its input pin, supplied it about 20V but used the Pi's GND pin to ground the pot. The Pi stopped working after sometime and the CPU heats up very quickly when powered ON, and the 'ACT' LED is not glowing / glowing very faintly (although the other LEDs do light up when i attach an ethernet cable). So is my Pi bricked ?? And am I eligible for a replacement under its warranty ?

P.S.: I did do the usual hardware tests listed here, and I get the the voltage difference between the two terminals of the F3 polyfuse to be sometimes less than 0.3V and sometimes greater than 0.3V.

Help !!

  • Pretty sure you've toasted it. Did you notice any Magic Blue Smoke? – recantha Jun 12 '14 at 8:48
  • What ADC did you use? If you were powering the ADC using 20V, the signal levels between it and the Pi might also have been 20V. – Gerben Jun 13 '14 at 13:14
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Which Pin of the Pi did you connect? The Raspberry Pi does not hace ADCs, and all digital Pins have a 3.3V level for HIGH. So I guess you damaged your Pi with that.

A GPIO pin should never be connected to a voltage source greater than 3.3V or less than 0V, as prompt damage to the chip may occur as the input pin substrate diodes conduct. as stated here

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    He said he was using an ADC. – recantha Jun 12 '14 at 8:48
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If you supplied 20V to a GPIO pin then I'm afraid you've busted that pin completely. Do not go over 3.3v!

I would reflash the SD card to make sure it isn't a filesystem corruption issue. If that works, then the Pi is not bricked. However, you won't be able to use the overloaded GPIO pin again.

The Raspberry Pi does not come with a warranty, as stated on its box.

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