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Is there a way to create a wireless network with Rpi as access points so that computers can connect to the Rpi and let the Rpi's route the traffic between the wireless access points. Should every Pi be a DHCP server? how should I do DNS? I'm trying to do this decentralized so when one Pi fails not all connectivity is lost. Should I use an address block, let's say 10.1.1.1\24 only for the Pi's and give every Pi a different block to distribute to clients? Also I would like to do this with 1 WLAN interface per Pi

Pi wireless:

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That's what OLSRd normally does (google 'OLSR'). There is a number of implementations.

If you have an amateur radio license you may consider HSMM-mesh network http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/ used by US radio amateurs.

There is a version of it for Raspberry Pi: https://github.com/urlgrey/hsmm-pi

It also works on consumer-grade Linksys routers (WRT54g) and more advanced Ubiquity hardware.

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  • The olsr.org OLSR daemon is an implementation of the Optimized Link State Routing protocol. As such it allows mesh routing for any network equipment. It runs on any wifi card that supports ad-hoc mode and of course on any ethernet device. OLSR is next to AODV one of the main two internet standards for mesh networks. It is widely used and well tested. – va3paw Jul 14 '14 at 22:57
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Check out https://commotionwireless.net/blog/2014/06/12/commotion-pi-build-rpi-mesh-node/ for a possible solution for you. Commotion seems to be a strong player in the meshnet arena.

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I made a tutorial on how to implement OLSRd on Raspberry Pi (Raspbian OS)

Check it out, and let me know what you think and how I can improve it: OLSRd Tutorial on my Github

It has all of the files that you need for configuration and is nice because it does not automatically go into Ad-Hoc / mesh mode at boot. Instead you run a shell script in order to put it into Ad-Hoc mode and the another script to start OLSRd

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  • Any system that relies on rc.local is suspect - especially as it is based on an obsolete OS. – Milliways Feb 14 at 1:41
  • I appreciate the feedback. Since when is Raspbian obsolete? – Charles Andre Feb 15 at 2:23
  • Also, please explain why using rc.local to reset networking settings (to ensure you can ssh in at boot) is suspect. Thank you! – Charles Andre Feb 15 at 2:24
  • raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/a/107934/8697 Jessie is obsolete. – Milliways Feb 15 at 2:52

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