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I am new to electronics and Raspberry Pi 2. I am able to use GPIO PINS for sample operations, but I am not able to understand what's the use of the below pins and any example for them:

  • PIN 3 GPIO02(SDA1,i2c)
  • PIN 5 GPIO03(SCL1,i2c)
  • PIN 7 GPIO04(GPIO_GCLK)
  • PIN 8 GPIO14(TXD0)
  • PIN 10 GPIO15(RXD0)
  • PIN 19 GPIO10(SPL_MOSI)
  • PIN 21 GPIO09(SPL_MISO)
  • PIN 23 GPIO11(SPL_CLK)
  • PIN 27 ID_SD(I2C IDEEPROM)
  • PIN 28 ID_SC(I2C IDEEPROM)

If anyone has sample programs to share for using these pins, it will be really a great help.

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    This is a problematic question to answer. This site discourages 'link only' answers because links rot over time, leaving those answers unusable. I don't think it's likely that you'll get a single answer big enough to incorporate all of the pins without resorting to large external pages. I'd recommend starting with adafruit's learning system resources, which should give you plenty to work on. If you get stuck with something in particular, here is a good place to ask for help.
    – goobering
    Feb 18 '16 at 18:05
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All the pins you mention are GPIO which means they can be configured as inputs and outputs as well as into the more specialised modes you have listed.

SDA1/SCL1 are the two GPIO needed for I2C bus 1. Look at any code to talk to an I2C sensor for example usage.

GPIO_GCLK may be configured as a general clock, which just means it can transmit a square wave. I can't imagine many people use the GPIO in that mode.

TXD0/RXD0 are the two GPIO needed for a serial link. Look at any serial link code for example usage.

SPI MOSI, MISO, CLK, and CEx are the GPIO needed for the main SPI bus. Look at any code to talk to a SPI sensor (e.g. ADC) for example usage.

ID_SD/ID_SC are the two GPIO needed for I2C bus 0. These GPIO are reserved for HAT usage, although you can use them as I2C bus 0 if you don't use a HAT.

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