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I'm trying to wipe my sd card because I want to completely start over with my raspi. I tried wiping it with gparted but somehow after every modification I try to make on it, it remains the same afterwards. I just tried wiping it with sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/mmcblk0 bs=8192 but once it was done it gave me a

dd: error writing '/dev/mmcblk0': No space left on device
1955713+0 records in
1955712+0 records out
1621192704 bytes (16 GB) copied, 408,205 s, 39,2 MB/s

What's going on here and more importantly? How do I actually wipe this thing?

EDIT 1: I don't know if this is relevant, but I might just mention it as well. GParted doesn't detect my regular ssd, but only the sd-card.

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    Why do you want to wipe the device. Just repartition it. This method of wiping does nothing more than waste write cycles. – Jacobm001 Mar 9 '16 at 19:07
  • Repartitioning it would be fine too, but it doesn't work either (tried it through gparted). So I thought I'd go with the more thorough method. – Rien Heuver Mar 9 '16 at 19:20
  • Try using minitool parition wizard, I use it all the time, it works great at removing the partition Windows can't see. You can then create a new partition that is the full size of the SD card. DO NOT REPEAT WIPE YOUR SD CARD. It is a sure fire way of reducing its lifespan. – Darth Vader Mar 9 '16 at 19:28
  • If you are trying to do this kind of thing with card in the pi it won't work. – goldilocks Mar 9 '16 at 20:04
  • It is not possible to modify a mounted filesystem, on the Pi or any other Linux system. If you are installing Raspbian there is no need (and no point). Raspbian is a disk image and will overwrite the existing. You only need a clean card to install NOOBS. – Milliways Mar 9 '16 at 22:20
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You are already successfully wiping the card. You didn't include a count= in the dd command - so it will keep on going until you have written zeros to every block on the target device as /dev/zero is infinite in size.

  • I'm quite sure I'm not wiping successfully, because when I check the card afterwards, it still has all the files on there. – Rien Heuver Mar 10 '16 at 22:13

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