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I am sure many people have bench marked Raspberry Pi's, but what about physical tests?

These include maximum and minimum operating temperatures, what force has to be applied to the PCB to break, e.t.c

Has anyone carried out a set of tests like this? And what were the results?

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These include maximum and minimum operating temperatures

A personal fav of mine is from the folks who submerged one in liquid nitrogen (>= -196 °C) on the end of an ethernet cable and it kept working down to a processor temp of about -80 °C, and was okay afterward.

http://www.geek.com/chips/raspberry-pi-proven-to-be-stable-when-submerged-in-liquid-nitrogen-1555235/

Some managed to use a liquid difluoroethane (>= -25 °C) filled tube to overclock a model B to almost 3 Ghz, briefly...

http://www.overclock.net/t/1404207/extreme-cooled-raspberry-pi

I've left one outdoors inside tupperware with a power bank (which also produces some heat) for hours at -20 °C (which is within the official specs, I think -40 °C) and the lowest core temp I've observed that way is still + 20 °C.

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A bright Xenon flashlight causes a shutdown: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGtMRiHwU1A

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    I know this was a chuckle when the pi 2 came out -- are you sure it was not corrected / applies to the 3? (For those who don't want to bother with a youtube video, it has to do with a critical component being sensitive to intense light). – goldilocks May 1 '16 at 13:53
  • is the plastic thin enough to transmit UV, or is it really the EMP that's messing it up? – JayEye May 2 '16 at 18:58
  • @goldilocks Same YT Channel has a the same video with Pi 3 – Motte001 May 2 '16 at 20:06
  • @JayEye Not a physicist but I believe anything involving intense flashes of light could be described as "EMP"? Anyway, it's not the kind of EMP that is generally disruptive to electronics. I was also wrong about it being UV (corrected above), it's the opposite: Here's the Foundation's official story, and the component is the CPU's power regulator. – goldilocks May 2 '16 at 20:26
  • neato. It appears to have been "fixed" on the Pi3. U16 is an ordinary plastic-covered IC. – JayEye May 2 '16 at 20:58
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I tried dipping mine in molten tungsten, and it did not work afterwords :)

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    C'mon, you didn't?! Are you running a Terminator termination facility or why would you have molten tungsten around? – Ghanima May 2 '16 at 0:04

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