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Is there a way to check if a named program is currently running on an RPi? I am currently running my RPi headless with a VNC server over LAN to initiate the program and check it from time to time when I'm at home.

Now, I have SSH access to my device from anywhere and I wish to see if my script is running. Is there a way to do it?

Also is it possible to see the print values of that script running in the terminal?

The program runs on Raspbian OS on RPi 3.

Thanks!

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    FYI you should check the latest series on the blog (re: SSH) I am currently working on the SSH security section. – Steve Robillard Aug 26 '16 at 1:45
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@SteveRobillard answered my question in the comments. I will re-iterate it here for everyone to see clearly!

1. Viewing running programs:

In the terminal type: ps aux | grep programname

ps = display currently running processes

a = show processes for all users

u = display the process' user/owner

x = show processes not attached to a terminal

grep = search for a name of the process (i.e. programname)

2. Viewing the currently open terminal session over SSH.

Use tmux or screen. I used tmux and followed instructions provided in the blog run by @jacob001 and @SteveRobillard: https://raspberrypise.tumblr.com/post/141348857424/tmux-101-installing-from-source.

Once tmux was installed, as per installation guide, I tested it by running my program through it on my RPi. Then I connected to the RPi remotely via SSH using my laptop (I used weaved.com service in this case). Once connected, I typed tmux in the terminal to run it and a new session opened. Subsequently, I typed CTRL-B then ( to switch to the previous session (the one I initialized earlier on my RPi). And voilà, this way I could access live program's output (printed sensor values) remotely!

Resources:

  • Would just pidof programname (found here) work for you as well? – uhoh Mar 13 '18 at 9:52

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