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So,

I want to make an UPS for my raspberry PI, but the UPS needs to be able to supply power to the pi for several hours.

So I mean this:

The pi originally gets power from the wall socket, but in case there is a power outage, the pi needs to continue to run. The problem is, I don't have an ethernet nor wifi connection on the pi (because it's a standalone application).

The batteries need to be recharged when the power is back.

How can I acheve this?

marked as duplicate by goldilocks Feb 25 '17 at 13:10

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    "How can I acheve this?" -> Buy one. A rock bottom cheap (~$35 USD) UPS will likely power a pi for 12-24 hours+. It's going to cost you at least half that in materials to build one anyway, and very easily more (i.e., a DIY UPS is bound to end up a waste of time and money). They are very simple. You plug the UPS into the wall, and the Pi into the UPS. – goldilocks Feb 25 '17 at 13:06
  • And how can I let this work? Since I don't know anything about that, it needs to work plug and play. I don't mind the cost of it. – Robin Feb 25 '17 at 13:16
  • Go look at one online. They literally look like overweight power bars because of the battery inside. Like I said, you plug it into the wall, and the pi into it. The end. – goldilocks Feb 25 '17 at 13:18
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    NO THEY DO NOT. Until the battery runs out, of course. But that is inevitable. There is not yet magic such that one can keep an electrical device running forever with no power source. – goldilocks Feb 25 '17 at 13:21
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    I don't know how many other ways to explain this in plain English. This is the 100% whole, entire, and sole purpose of a UPS. They are plugged into the wall. They contain a battery. They have normal AC jacks on them into which you can plug whatever you want -- a clock radio, a television set, a raspberry pi. As long as there is power at the outlet to which they are connected, they keep the battery topped up, and provide power from the wall. If and when the power goes out, the battery kicks in UNINTERRUPTED, as in uninterruptible power supply. The TV/pi/whatever stays on!!!!!! – goldilocks Feb 25 '17 at 13:31