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I’m new to raspberry Pi. I have just ordered the Raspberry Pi 3 model b. There are a few things that I would like to do with it. The first would be to use l Retro Pi, the second would be to use OSMC or some sort of media entertainment system and the third would be to use it a a normal computer / operating system (Raspbian). I’m a bit confused as to how I could do all of these things.
Is a different boot disk required, for Retro Pi, for OSMC and Raspbian. (One for each? And depending on what I want to do, I insert the corresponding disk in the Raspberry Pi?) Or can I put them all on the same disk? Can I install Raspbian and subsequently start Retro Pi and OSMC via a programs list?

Any bit of advice helps! Thanks!

Jay

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    I would suggest you will get the best experience running them on separate SD cards. Given how quickly the Pi boots this does not incur a large time penalty. If you install them all to the same card (which is complicated but possible) and don't allocate enough space you will face issues down the road with media storage and updates. – Steve Robillard Jun 29 '17 at 21:37
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It's possible to achieve this but it requires fiddling with partitions and you need the NOOBS installer from the Raspberry Pi foundation. i know it's not good practice to refer to websites only but it is really too complicated to explain here.

Relevant links:
a hassle free all in one solution
a site on how to create a suitable image for NOOBS

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PINN is a custom version of the NOOBS Operating System Installer for the Raspberry Pi. That allows you to install Retro Pi, for OSMC and Raspbian all together. Holding down the shift key on boot then changes OS. Available on GitHub.

However, for now I would just use NOOBS. Stick to Raspbian for now till you learn more about SD cards and the Pi. The Pi has a small learning curve around SD cards. After confidence is gained switch to using PINN. I would also look into the experimental USB booting option on the Pi 3 which lets you boot without an SD card. That way you can access multiple OS images on one drive and still have plenty of space.

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