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Raspberry Pi 1 Model A here.

I am planning on using this pushbutton in a hobby project that is very similar to this CamJam EduKit project.

In that CamJam project link, on page 2, I see a simple wiring diagram where it shows how to wire up the pushbutton:

enter image description here

If I'm looking at this correctly:

  • It appears that I place a resistor in between the voltage source and the pushbutton's PWR pin
  • It appears that I place a GPIO output pin in between this resistor and the pushbutton's PWR pin

If these assumptions are true, then I have a few concerns:

  • With LEDs, you usually put the resistor in between the LED's GND pin and the GND, so why is it the opposite with pushbuttons (putting the resistor on the "inbound"/PWR side, rather than the "outbound"/GND side)?; and
  • My pushbutton has 3 pins; I assume 1 is PWR and 1 is GND, but what's the 3rd? And how do I figure out which pin is which?
  • I assume that the calculation for the resistor is the same with pushbuttons as it is for LEDs. That is, the GPIO output pin is yielding 3.3V of voltage, the pushbutton is rated at 12V @ .5A, so this is 3.3V - 12V = -8.7V (maybe this is why the resistor goes on the PWR/incoming side?!). 8.7V / .5A = 17 ohm resistor? Am I doing that right?

Thanks in advance for any and all help!

  • Why the DV? It's on topic, isn't a dupe, shows research and is an SSCCE. – smeeb Sep 8 '17 at 1:14
  • I didn't down-vote, but it's arguable about whether this shows research. Your question about the pins, for example, is answered directly in the first sentence of the link that you gave for it.... In any case, I attempted an answer, so hopefully that helps. – Brick Sep 8 '17 at 2:53
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You seem to have several misconceptions going into the question, so let me start with those:

  • You can put the resistor on either leg of an LED in general, as long as they are in series. I'm not sure why you think otherwise.
  • In a closed loop, the total resistance along the loop determines the current. For both the switch and the LED the resistor is there to limit current.

Now regarding your interpretation of the diagram, both points that you give reflect what's shown.

Regarding your specific questions:

  • For input pins, you can have them trigger when they are high or when they are low. This set-up is for the pin to register "pressed" as low. The resistor that concerns you is a "pull-up" to high that keeps the pin high when the switch is open. When the switch is closed there's a resistance-free path to ground, so the pin will see "low".
  • Your push button is really two switches in one. Read the description at the link you gave. It tells why there are three pins and what they do. It's pretty specific.
  • There's some art to choosing pull-up resistor values. Roughly you want to choose them "large" so that you don't draw a lot of unnecessary current, but not "too large" so that they don't actually pull. There's a ton of information on this if you search for "pull-up resistor" and/or its dual "pull-down resistor." You're probably safe in this case using one close to what's shown in your tutorial.
  • Thanks @Brick (+1) - real quick: can you please confirm (or clarify/correct me!) that my math for calculating the resistor is correct? That is 3.3V - 12V = -8.7V and 8.7V / .5A = 17 ohms? If not, what is a good way to calculate the resistor here? Thanks again so much! – smeeb Sep 8 '17 at 11:07
  • I cannot figure out where those numbers came from, especially the 12 V. (Is that the rating on the switch?) You really need to go read on pull-up / pull-down because you're off by more than a simple correction in a comment, i.e. you seem to not realized where the current is flowing and why. (You want to get the current much lower that 0.5 A.) The switch probably has essentially 0 resistance when closed, so it won't figure in the calculation. @smeeb – Brick Sep 8 '17 at 11:45
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I assume that the calculation for the resistor is the same with pushbuttons as it is for LEDs.

Your assumption is mixing input and output.

I have just explained what the difference between input and output is here:

RPi 1 Model A input/output pin ratings

And the reason for a pull-up/pull-down is that a GPIO pin without these can be in an "unknown state" aka floating and pick up static charges and behave erratic.

So a pull-up/pull-down resistor is forcing the input to always be in a known state!

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    Thanks @MatsK (+1) - real quick: can you please confirm (or clarify/correct me!) that my math for calculating the resistor is correct? That is 3.3V - 12V = -8.7V and 8.7V / .5A = 17 ohms? If not, what is a good way to calculate the resistor here? Thanks again so much! – smeeb Sep 8 '17 at 11:07
  • You have turn the math 180 degree in the wrong direction and is mixing a output with a LED as load and a input. The input resistance of a GPIO is 50-65K ohm then will a current of ~50uA flow through the button when it is pressed. The load of the button is max 0.5A. An analogy, you can connect a light bulb that have a maximum current in series with the button. So please read the url I provided above. – MatsK Sep 8 '17 at 12:14

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