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I want to buy some Pi Zeros and build a cluster.
I wanted to ask if i add an Ethernet port through a mini-USB to Usb OTG Adapter and a RJ45 Adapter, then the Pi Zero would function like the standard Raspberry Pi?
So that i could use adapt an tutorial of the standard version to the Pi Zero ?

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I want to buy some Pi Zeros and build a cluster.

This may take some time, as a quick search implies to me that even the non-wifi version is still hard to get -- some distributors are currently out of stock, and most or all of them will limit you to buying one per order. Meaning you would have to pay shipping separately for each pi.

I wanted to ask if i add an Ethernet port through a mini-USB to Usb OTG Adapter and a RJ45 Adapter, then the Pi Zero would function like the standard Raspberry Pi?

The processor is the same as the B+, albeit stamped with a higher frequency, and I believe inferior power regulation on the 5V rail, which has some consequences for USB (don't expect it to power much). It also has the awkward "mini" (not micro) HDMI jack for which you will need an adapter if you need to debug something using a local display. Which you will.

In the end you are not going to save anything much (taking shipping issues into account, you will pay more) -- if you pay $5 for the pi, $2 for the OTG adapter, and $10 for the ethernet adapter, you are almost halfway to the $40-$50 you would pay for a Pi 3, which has 4 (faster) cores and built in ethernet. So in fact using zeros you would end up spending twice as much for the same processing power, and have to put up with all the hassles that come with the oddball form factor.

That's without taking into account what I mentioned about per unit shipping costs, vs. no such restriction on the Pi 3.

  • Is there any other to "construct" cluster, because with the pi3 i would have to multiple of them and that would be "expensive" (Parantheses, because it is cheap compared to other stuff, but it would go over what i wanted to pay for first) – Filipe Ramalho Oct 22 '17 at 19:41
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    @FilipeRamalho you should identify the scope of your project. If it is for interest/learning then a cluster of 2 or 3 is enough to learn and the price difference between Pi0 and Pi3 is small. If you have an actual real-world problem and need hundreds or thousands of them... you should contact Raspberry Pi Foundation or major distributor to discuss volume pricing. You always have the option to wait for zero to be more widely available. – crasic Oct 22 '17 at 20:07
  • To re-emphasize an important point: I think you are assuming you can just order a box of Pi Zeros from somewhere at $5 each plus shipping for the entire box. If that is not true, and the shipping cost per unit is more than the price of the pi, then probably you need to re-evaluate. If it turns out you can order that box, great -- but I doubt it. – goldilocks Oct 22 '17 at 23:35
  • Time isn't a problem, i can buy it even in a year. The scope is mostly learning, a bit of real work, but that doesn't need even a full Pi3 – Filipe Ramalho Oct 23 '17 at 15:54
  • I'm not trying to upsell you or anything, but IMO the zero is the worst choice for someone new to the Pi. If you already have a substantial linux background, things are considerably easier, but the Pi 3 is still the easiest choice. None of them are very fast, but the Pi 3 is obviously the fastest, and it is reasonably priced. Taking into account the restrictions on distribution and need for various adapters the zero, OTOH, is a waste of money. Honestly. – goldilocks Oct 23 '17 at 16:04

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