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I was looking into some Bluetooth/Wireless audio solutions and wasn't a bit taken aback by what it costs for something that would actually work well.

The I looked at my Pi and started formulating a plan. However it's still a little half-cooked.

A lot of people are using Bluetooth device with their Pi and the Pi has audio out. There has to be a way to turn this into a wireless audio device, right? So I'm thinking a can get a Bluetooth adapter and plug some nice speakers in to the Pi and sit it behind my couch.

Questions:

  1. Does there even exist such a device that would send audio from my TV to the Pi over Bluetooth?
  2. What kind of quality would that provide? What kind of sound quality does the Pi provide?
  3. Is this just a stupid idea from a guy desperate to save a few bucks on wireless speakers?
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    TV's don't support bluetooth. Also, going digital, and sending data around will create a delay in the sound. Not very nice if the image on the tv and the sounds are out of sync. So for TV, I don't see how a Pi might do the trick. But can works for just playing music from e.g. your smartphone – Gerben Jun 27 '13 at 19:27
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Maybe there is a way if the Pi is used as the receiver as well, i.e. if you use a DVB stick or another kind of USB TV receiver with the pi, the at least there is a signal already inside the Pi. There might be a possibility to use a bluetooth device as audio out or another USB sound device for the audio signal. I have not tried it, but it might be an idea and worth a try.

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1. Yes. A dedicated device to send audio over Bluetooth are not cheap.

But you can find cheap and popular Bluetooth devices wait for audio and have an output. This is good for your speakers side I suppose. Like iPhone music to the A2DP reciever.

The tricky part is sending audio from your TV. I suppose the Raspberry Pi can do this. But it has no audio inputs... So you need a USB Audio card. From reading I heard there are some serious issues with recording audio on the Pi :( BUT! Adding a Bluetooth USB dongle to the Pi and piping the audio data into the A2DP profile will allow you to stream over Bluetooth.

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2.

Quality is 44.1khz Stereo -or- 48Khz joint. And will be the same quality as the input signal. This is because the audio is digitized and send over ether in ones and zeros. Then re assembled on the other side exactly the same way. The drawback is it only stereo or mono. There is no 5 channel or DTS/Surround support. (But you may use several to accomplish this.) Some Bluetooth devices allow for superior audio quality and raw audio formats but that might be a bit difficult to implement on the Pi

3.

No ambitious idea is ever stupid. But be careful as prototype projects can sometimes cost as much as the real deal.. sometimes even more. But take it from me. Its worth the fun learning about it :)

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Just got an email from Sparkfun about Bluetooth Audio

enter image description here

The RN-52 Bluetooth from Roving Networks is an audio module that makes it simple for you to create a hands free audio system for your car or remote control your media center. With this breakout board we've made it easy for you to drop it into any project you could use it for. All pertinent headers are broken out and labeled for your convenience.

The RN-52 module combines a class 2 Bluetooth radio with an embedded digital signal processor (DSP). The module is programmed and controlled with a simple ASCII command language. It provides a UART interface, several user programmable I/O pins, stereo speaker outputs, microphone inputs, and a USB port.

Microphone inputs being key here. THis is where you want your TV to stream stereo audio into. I suppose you could use a Raspberry on the Speaker side as audio output and a cheap USB Bluetooth dongle that supports A2DP :)

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