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I am trying to set my Raspberry Pi as a server at home using IPv6. At home I have a dual stack.

I need to know how can I connect from outside internet IPv4 (Client) to IPv6(Server at home) via SSH.

So much I have seen multiple threads about the same issue but without a clear answer.

  • Does your home internet provider give you full native IPv6? If it does then your device should get a IPv6 address based on part of what your ISP gave you. Then using that IPv6 you can connect as long as you have another IPv6 computer. Please explain some more on what you have tried and how your IPv6 works. IPv4 is a bit different. Your Pi should get a IPv6 address that is not blocked by NAT.. but your router may block it (security.. but I am not sure which one you got) IPv4 is blocked and locked by default – Piotr Kula Jan 22 at 16:15
  • ipv6 to ipv6 is no problem at all. the issue here is ipv4 to ipv6 – the_Begin Jan 22 at 16:42
  • We'll need a lot more information. Do you have IPv6 service from your Internet provider? Does your router support IPv6? Do you have IPv6 service to whatever client you are trying to connect from? What type of Ipv4 to ipv6 mechanism does your provider and/or router provide? – Jeremy Impson Jan 22 at 22:06
  • You will need to look into 4to6 tunnelling. Some newer routers may have this but really you should stick to 4 or 6 as it not backwards compatible and if you have. This is the trouble we will have while we move to v6 – Piotr Kula Jan 22 at 22:07
  • blog.fawcs.info/2017/07/… - Maybe that can help. It seems that 4to6 tunneling is a real problem 6to4 is easier and you can use something like Hurricane Electric – Piotr Kula Jan 23 at 8:53
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Your question is a bit thin on details. I note in your response to @ppumpkin that you can connect IPv6-to-IPv6 perfectly. You say the shape of your problem is connecting from IPv4 to IPv6. If your Pi is setup on a world-routable Global Unicast Address then it SHOULD be contactable from outside your LAN assuming the IPv6 FW rules allow a hole for the connection- FROM ANOTHER IPv6 HOST

HOWEVER: Even if your Pi is assigned a Global Unicast Address and the FW rules are also correct, you need to connect from a host that also supports IPv6. If your connection is from a single-stack IPv4 network, you will not be able to connect to the Pi. BOTH sides of the connection must support the IPv6 protocol. You appear to be saying that you're trying to connect from an IPv4-only host to the IPv6 addressed Pi. Example: My Pi is setup on a Global Unicast Address but I cannot SSH to it's IPv6 address from my phone as my mobile provider has zero support for IPv6 in their network. HTH bud- Terrence

  • You appear to be saying that you're trying to connect from an IPv4-only host to the IPv6 addressed Pi. Example: My Pi is setup on a Global Unicast Address but I cannot SSH to it's IPv6 address from my phone as my mobile provider has zero support for IPv6 in their network. HTH bud- Terrence Exactly, I thought that it could be done like with NAT64 or so, but since my IT skills are at beginner level I thought I would ask you guys what to do :) – the_Begin Jan 23 at 15:54
  • No problem- we all have to start somewhere. But do try to be a bit tighter in defining the shape of your problem. BTW, Hurricane Electric (HE.net) has an iPhone app called "Network Tools". This will show you ALL your interface information on your iPhone (which I use a lot to connect to my Pis) to help you quickly determine if you're broken connectivity is down to a FW issue, or that your connection simply has no IPv6 support. The HE app is like the Swiss Army knife of Networking tools. Worth having on your phone- Terrence – F1Linux Jan 23 at 16:11
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    @the_Begin if my answer solved your question- which I guess you're saying it did- if you could mark your question as answered would save folks reviewing it unnecessarily as it will continue to show as unanswered- – F1Linux Feb 12 at 10:25
  • I am sorry to say but no, it didn't help me find a solution. – the_Begin Feb 13 at 8:41
  • Apologies for the confusion- thought you were saying in your comment above that you had been trying to connect without a routable IPv6 address. I'm a bit of an IPv6 evangelist, so can pick it up with you again this weekend if you still need a hand getting connectivity- – F1Linux Feb 13 at 13:13
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Raspbian and many operating systems now support IPv6 and actually try to use IPv6 before IPv4.

Your router may be giving you IPv6 addresses but it does not mean your internet provider supports this. In your question you said you have a dual stack, so I suppose in Germany ISP's are giving you v6 now? If that is true then your router should be getting a v6 address and all other devices should be getting a similar v6 address from your ISP. It is usually the same of v6 and then you can have millions of devices on the v6 internet without NAT. That means you can connect/ ping your device from any other v6 enabled place.

That is the theory. Your router may be blocking incoming requests to protect your devices? SO you can try these

  1. First test would be to ping your routers IPv6 address and see if you get a ping
  2. Make sure your Pi IPv6 start with the same address as your router (private space) and ping that.
  3. Check your router/ gateway security settings.

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IPv4 is different and that question has been answered to death everywhere. Typically requiring port forwarding and maybe a more relaxed NAT setting

One way to be able to connect your IPv6 Pi to a IPv4 address is to use a VPS (like a cheap DigitalOcean box) that has a IPv4 address you connect to. On that box you have a reverse proxy, VPN or something relaying that trafic to your IPv6 end point. Its a small extra cost but it is probably what you need to do until routers have this facility built in.

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