0

I have new RPi 3B+ intended to run 24/7. I am looking to ensure it doesn't overheat, so am wondering whether having wired ethernet would make it run cooler than using the WiFi? The Pi is situated next to the router, so could be hard-wired (I just haven't bothered obtaining a cable)

And would having an HDMI cable connected cause it to run warmer than without the cable connected? At this stage I'm running it headless, but depending on what else I do with it I may look at using the HDMI output as well.

I don't foresee any operations that should make it heat up though, just wanting to look after it

  • 1
    Both of those may help, but the big factor is going to be the ambient air temp where its being placed, and how much airflow its gets. The pi will throttle itself and even shutdown if the core themp gets to high. I would put it in place and run it for a day or two, maybe log the core temp for that time and see if you need to add a fan, change whats connected, or maybe do nothing at all. – Chad G Feb 5 at 0:32
  • 1
    Here's how one person approached your question. You may find something useful in here regarding monitoring RPi temperature. – Seamus Feb 5 at 1:25
  • @ChadG So far it hasn't risen past about 55-60C, I'm just concerned about when summer hits the air won't be as cool as it is now. But I am happy to see that it will throttle or shutdown if required – Midavalo Feb 5 at 1:42
  • @Seamus Thanks for that link - it did come with heat-sinks so I'll probably attach those, I was just surprised there seemed to be very little info about using them – Midavalo Feb 5 at 1:43
  • Heat sinks are cheap insurance, but remember that they require a certain amount of airflow to be useful. Also, consider "monitoring" the temperature of your RPi to get a feel for what's "normal" in your environment and for your usage. – Seamus Feb 5 at 15:22
2

I don't foresee any operations that should make it heat up though, just wanting to look after it

You are probably being paranoid. Pi's are made to run 24/7, and like most other computers, there are some built-in defences against overheating: The firmware will throttle the CPU when it exceeds 80℃. Further, chips in general are rated in such a way that using them to their maximum default potential should make overheating difficult under reasonably normal ambient conditions.

If you are worried, you should log temps every minute for a day or so. However, unless you are doing something that you know will max the Pi out for a prolonged period.

That said, if you can use ethernet instead of wifi, there are lots of good reasons to prefer ethernet, esp. on the gbit lan models.

2

To have an answer, here is a compilation from the comments.

Having a wired ethernet connection and no HDMI cable may help to get cooler, but the big factor is going to be the ambient air temp where its being placed, and how much airflow its gets. The pi will throttle itself and even shutdown if the core themp gets to high. I would put it in place and run it for a day or two, maybe log the core temp for that time and see if you need to add a fan, change whats connected, or maybe do nothing at all. --@Chad G

Here's how one person approached your question. You may find something useful in here regarding monitoring RPi temperature. Heat sinks are cheap insurance, but remember that they require a certain amount of airflow to be useful. Also, consider "monitoring" the temperature of your RPi to get a feel for what's "normal" in your environment and for your usage. --@Seamus

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.