Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 8697

The file system is the way an operating system organises its data on the storage (usually non-volatile, like an SD card) available to it.

0
votes
I don't know what pyaudio.py does, or where it is located. I assume in one of the system directories, in which case modifying it is not a good idea. The normal way to modify system files is sudo nano …
answered Nov 12 '16 by Milliways
0
votes
You need to mount the SD Card in a Linux machine (or other which can manipulate ext4 partitions) to resize the partitions. You cannot do this on OS X, although it was possible on earlier OS X with e …
answered May 26 '16 by Milliways
0
votes
You cannot run Linux on a RO file system (without extensive reconfiguration). There are too many temp and log files etc. What you can do is use a file system on a disk or USB Key. You need to change …
answered Sep 18 '14 by Milliways
1
vote
SD Cards can only erase blocks of a minimum size - usually 4MB. Any files which overlap the Erase Block boundaries require 2 blocks to be erased (and possibly rewritten) so Raspbian partitions are a …
answered Mar 2 by Milliways
3
votes
AFAIK there is no simple fix. If you have another Linux system you could try disk repair, but this appears not to have worked. Presumably some of the files have been damaged. You may be able to replac …
answered Nov 16 '15 by Milliways
1
vote
The installer copies a disk image, overwriting the MBR and partition information. The good news is that the image is quite small, and so is unlikely to have overwritten your data, if this was not nea …
answered May 9 '14 by Milliways
1
vote
Your question is futile. You don't even NEED to even mount the boot partition, I presume you mean /. Normal Linux writes to the filesystem all the time and won't work if it is not writable. It is …
answered May 13 '17 by Milliways
0
votes
If you write an image it does a block copy - so the original content is irrelevant - just another un-necessary write cycle. Incidentally having an image copy on the original (with the same PARTUUID) …
answered Dec 26 '18 by Milliways
3
votes
The first step in putting an OS on the Pi effectively erases the card and installs new partitions. All OS use a small FAT as boot partition ~100MB, and most use the remainder as EXT4.
answered Sep 15 '14 by Milliways
2
votes
No modern computer system with R/W mass storage can safely by powered down by unplugging. Most computers with a soft power button actually run software to ensure a safe shutdown. The Pi has no such ci …
answered Jun 2 '15 by Milliways
1
vote
The Pi has a unique Serial Number. This should uniquely identify each Pi. The Ethernet MAC is related to this, and similarly unique. Any other solution, such as creating files or hostname involves st …
answered Feb 12 '16 by Milliways
0
votes
The Pi CAN boot directly from USB (at least Pi3) You should have root=PARTUUID=5c1ec57d-02 - the bootloader doesn't know what to do with a UUID You are not mounting the partition (it is commented ou …
answered Jun 11 '18 by Milliways
2
votes
Q1 You won't see anything on Windows (or OS X) because they don't have support for ext4, although this can be installed. The easiest way to see what you have is with a Linux system (or live disk). On …
answered Dec 29 '13 by Milliways
1
vote
Firstly, whatever filesystem or OS, you should always shut down correctly (or risk disk corruption). I would not use NTFS on Linux. Journalling is not supported by Linux, and many do not even … support write. Journalling allows the OS to correct filesystem errors, and your Windows system is probably fixing itself, although it obviously would not find a journal from Linux. NTFS does not support …
answered Feb 1 '15 by Milliways
0
votes
OSX does not support Ext4 so you won't be able to edit /etc/network/interfaces on the Pi. 'sudo nano /etc/network/interfaces' would be trying to access the file on your Mac. You will need a Linux ma …
answered Aug 28 '14 by Milliways

15 30 50 per page