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34

The easiest solution is to use Yaourt (Yet AnOther User Repository Tool). You can install with: pacman -S yaourt And then sync with the AUR: yaourt -Syy You can then search AUR packages: yaourt package-name Which will provide interactive prompts for installation. Or if you know the package name exactly: yaourt -S package-name Most pacman commands ...


31

The deprecated netcfg used /etc/network.d/ to store profiles. The successor of netcfg is netctl. In order to setup a wireless network, install netctl using sudo pacman -S netctl. Next, you have to create a network profile. /etc/netctl/examples/ contains some examples. Let's assume you want to setup a WPA2-PSK network. Simply copy over the example file and ...


21

In /boot/cmdline.txt, add rw just before rootwait


19

The official instructions for creating a "direct connection" on a network hopefully just work for most people, but it seems pulseaudio and I do not get along that well: it took me hours. [Besides "direct connection", you can also use a "tunnel" method described further down, but I recommend reading this first.] I now have a (fedora 17) desktop streaming ...


17

Here is quite a simple Arch Arm RPi Guide. Download the zip file containing the dd image from one of these resources: Torrent Direct Download Extract the zip file to your hard drive, giving you the dd image archlinuxarm-29-04-2012.img Write this image to the target SD card Linux Replacing sdX with the location of the SD card, ...


12

Instructions for cross-compiling Downloaded the driver sources from the Edimax website. Clone the kernel sources from GitHub. cd into your kernel source and cd into include/linux. Run ln -s smp.h smp_lock.h`. unzip the Edimax download and tar -xzf the driver package. cd into the driver/rtl... subdirectory. Edit include/rtw_xmit.h and add #include <...


12

Certain things can be disabled that improve boot up speed - swap for instance (my Pi takes ages to activate it.) However, SD card reads are comparatively slow, and the device itself isn't all that fast - I don't think there's a magic bullet to make it boot up that much faster than by default. I know it's something you've considered already, but personally ...


12

These instructions assume you have a working cross-compiler on the slave. Please read How to build a GCC 4.7 toolchain for cross-compiling? if you haven't. It is also useful to have make installed on the master. Installation First, we must install distcc. We shall use the prebuilt packages supplied by the operating systems' package management systems, but ...


12

I've never used Arch, so this list of advantages is based on reading their documentation, and summarising it as follows: Whilst Debian has a bigger repository of software, the Arch repositories include packages that wouldn't qualify as 'free' according to GNU (and therefore wouldn't be included in Debian repositories). Arch packages tend to be current, more ...


11

Quoting from ntpd documentation: In case there is no TOY chip or for some reason its time is more than 1000s from the server time, ntpd assumes something must be terribly wrong and the only reliable action is for the operator to intervene and set the clock by hand. Again, quoting from the ntpd man page: -s Set the time immediately at startup if ...


10

All of the above answers are outdated. My answer is not very good, but hopefully avoids the issue of becoming outdated. The official wiki explains, in detail, how one goes about installing/building a package that is not part of pacman (packer and yaourt as of this date). Both packer and yaourt are flagged as out of date in AUR. (this may change in the ...


10

To get the best speed out of your MacBook's SD slot, you need to use a 'raw disk' device. This is a SanDisk Ultra Class 10 card: ~/Desktop/rpi $ sudo dd if=2012-12-16-wheezy-raspbian.img of=/dev/disk1 bs=8m 231+1 records in 231+1 records out 1939865600 bytes transferred in 1076.078932 secs (1802717 bytes/sec) Compare this to using /dev/rdisk1 instead of /...


10

I just ran into this issue myself. I found two ways to create the SD card using the .tar.gz images provided by ArchLinuxARM, provided you have a USB SD card reader. Method 1: Raspberry Pi + USB card reader + 1 additional SD card This method requires an additional SD card and a USB card reader. It uses Linux on your Raspberry Pi to build an new SD card that ...


8

On your Raspberry Pi, all you would need to do is install the dhcp package. Arch: sudo pacman -S dhcp Debian: apt-get install isc-dhcp-server You then edit the configuration file at /etc/conf.d/dhcp which tells the dhcp server which interface on which to listen with this line: DHCP4_ARGS="... eth0" You then start the server daemon with: sudo /etc/rc....


8

I'm posting this as an answer as there is not enough space in comments. So from all the information gathered so far it seems that the problem is only related to /boot/ partition contents. Now the problem can be caused by two things: 1. /boot/ filesystem corruption which makes it impossible for bootloader to load firmware files 2. New version of firmware has ...


8

It's fine It's shutting down just fine. If you check the schematic, you'll see there is no power management. From USB in to the SoC is just copper (and a fuse), so the chip stays powered up even when it's shut down. What do I do once I have run shutdown -h now? Just remove the USB from the socket.


8

As mentioned in another question, the fake-hwclock package can help make sure that time keeps ticking forward and not resetting to 1970. Edit: if you are not using Debian or Raspbian, but are playing with Arch Linux (Or anything with systemd), this site has a service that will work essentially the same as the package mentioned above


8

The driver you need is in the repositories. pacman -Sy dkms-8192cu If you could get internet access temporarily, you could simply download and install it.


7

UPDATE: Arch Linux ARM now natively supports armv6h so will run optimised on the Pi. The rest of this answer still applies to other architectures. Yes it would be possible, but you would have to recompile every piece of software for ARMv6-hard. Arch have build systems and infrastructure to do this automatically for their supported platforms (ARMv5-soft ...


7

I use packer for this purpose which in my opinion is a faster alternative to yaourt. Just add these two lines to your /etc/pacman.conf: [archlinuxfr] Server = http://repo.archlinux.fr/$arch Then you can install/update packer via pacman: # pacman -Sy packer And use packer in pretty much the same way you use pacman: $ packer -S some_aur_package Also if ...


7

Jivings answer holds true if you happen to have an image of Arch Linux around. As of now however such images are no longer issued by Arch Linux. Instead the full file system is provided as a .tar.gz and has to be installed to the SD card from scratch. After preparation of the partition table using fdisk and creation of the file systems mkfs the root and ...


7

root/root See here: "The default root password is 'root'."


7

That is nothing unusual. RAM discs are commonly used for temporary file systems. My Debian laptop Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on udev 1.5G 0 1.5G 0% /dev tmpfs 301M 32M 269M 11% /run /dev/sda2 47G 31G 14G 71% / tmpfs 1.5G 1.7M 1.5G 1% /dev/shm tmpfs 5.0M 8.0K 5.0M 1% ...


6

e4rat eliminates seek times and rotational delays through physical file realloction. It's meant for hard disks with rotating platters and moving heads, no use for solid state devices. SD card is essentially a SSD. From archlinux wiki: Users of SSD drives do not benefit because there are no moving parts and thus (almost) no disk latency. Archlinux wiki ...


6

SD card speed class rating specifies minimal read/write performance the card should have while recording video. Class number is the lower speed limit in MB/s you should get when using the card. Keep in mind, however, that reading from card is usually much simpler (and thus faster) than writing. This is why usual class 6 card will have 6MB/s write speed by ...


6

I fixed the issue by manually adding the i2c group and setting the group for i2c-* devices in udev. Thanks @ikku for the hints. # groupadd i2c # usermod -aG i2c myusername # echo 'KERNEL=="i2c-[0-9]*", GROUP="i2c"' >> /etc/udev/rules.d/10-local_i2c_group.rules There is no need to install i2c-tools to access the I2C bus for users in the group i2c (but ...


6

You have to install a GUI. According to this page on eLinux.org, Arch for the RPi does not come pre-installed with a GUI. To install any GUI with Arch, either just search the internet or use the Arch Wiki Here is how to install LXDE: pacman -S openbox lxde gamin dbus #Lxde and needed dependancies pacman -S xorg-server xorg-xinit xorg-server-utils #...


6

While I don't have Arch Linux to check if this, it's probably mounted by kernel itself and never remounted. You can check your /proc/cmdline and you should see something like root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 and rootfstype=ext4 options. You can set them in /boot/cmdline.txt file. First one specifies which device (partition) should be mounted as root device, second one ...


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