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is there a possibility to read information trough the serial device even if there is no boot device? See Ingo's answer -- which may or may not provide useful information in the context of your question. I would expect there to be some way other than connecting a screen to figure out that the device is not booting and why. This kind of circumvents the ...


4

is there a possibility to read information trough the serial device even if there is no boot device? Yes! It is possible since Raspberry Pi 4B. The RPi 4B comes with an EEPROM containing the boot loader and that is reprogramable. Have a look at Raspberry Pi 4 boot EEPROM. There you can set a debug flag BOOT_UART=1 as described at Pi4 Bootloader ...


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Watchdog is built into the Raspbian kernel using CONFIG_WATCHDOG=y in kernel parameters, so rmmod is not possible unless you rebuild the kernel. /proc/sys/kernel/watchdog is not implemented in Raspbian either. I'm not sure about Arch, but judging by your question the situation there is similar. You don't need GRUB to pass parameters to the kernel: on ...


2

No, Arch doesn't come with a desktop environment. Why, because whats the fun in having one pre-installed. The point in Arch is, to build it yourself.


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@goldilock's answer provides a good overview for debugging boot issues. However, to answer the question of: So, is there a possibility to read information trough the serial device even if there is no boot device? This would generally be done through JTAG, using a hardware debugger. This provides capabilities such as reading memory and register values, ...


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If @goldilocks' solution does not work, which it did not for me, you can always do a DNS lookup on the failing hostnames and use your /etc/hosts file to map the IP addresses to the hostnames. I had to go back and forth from pinging the failed mirror host names on another machine to test and get the IP addresses, mapping them on my arch server's hosts file, ...


2

I haven't completely understood what you have done, but in respect to your own answer it is in general possible to run 32 bit programs on a RasPi running a 32 bit or a 64 bit kernel. You cannot run a 64 bit program on a 32 bit kernel, which is default. For this you must use a 64 bit kernel. Raspbian Buster has a precompiled 64 bit kernel available together ...


1

I was able to install 64-bit archlinux on a Raspberry Pi 4 after seeing @VinnieThePooh's answer which contained a link to root filesystems which I then could burn into the SD Card and boot. Here are the exact steps I took: 1. Insert your SD Card and run blkid to see connected device names: sudo blkid For me the device name was /dev/sda but it might be ...


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By creating that post, I noticed that aarch64 is the crucial part. I need aarch64-linux-gnu-g++ for compilation and the resulting image will run directly. It seems that - unlike Windows - 32bit programs cannot be run on a 64bit architecture.


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I've been in the same situation, wanting to run Arch on my Pi with only the MacBook without Linux. Requirements: USB Stick + SD Card + Live Linux If you haven't got a USB SD card reader, you can write a Debian live image (or any favorite LIVE distro) to the USB stick, on macOS, using, for example, balenaEtcher or the dd utility from Terminal, then you can ...


1

I had the same problem. Found out I had connected the wrong power supply (only good for 600mA) but it was reading 5.0009V. Connected the 2.5A Pi PS and it worked fine.


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