We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

New answers tagged

0

You could do this, BUT I wouldn't. It will produce a large backup, and running dd on a live image is not a good idea. You can't use vfat but could use any format which allows large files and is supported by Pi (e.g. exFAT) although ext4 is recommended. The split technique suggested by RalfFriedl would work I would suggest you look at How to shrink the ...


0

You can use any filesystem, including vfat, that is able to store a file, as described by @RalfFriedl in his answer. But if you use the simple dd command you have noted you will not get a consistent backup of your running system. Executing the command takes time and while this time many dynamic files will change on the disk that will be stored at different ...


0

Sure you can. Just hld down the shift key when the grey screen appears. It even tells you that on the screen.


0

Yes, you can create a backup with that command. The filesystem doesn't matter as long as it supports file of the required size. The maximum file length with VFAT is 4GiB. If your SD card is larger than 4GiB, you can still create a backup to a VFAT file system, but you have to split it into multiple files. sudo dd if=/dev/mmcblk0 bs=1M | split -b 2G /mnt/...


1

This is what -for now- works, I used Dmitry's answer to rework it some (curiously if I first calculated 5% and then subtracted it from original size, I got 192MB free setting ROOTFREE to 10MB): BTOT=$(tune2fs -l $ROOT | grep "Block count:" | grep -o -E [0-9]*) BLOCKSIZE=$(blockdev --getss $ROOT) ((TOTPART=BTOT*4096)) SIZEROOT=$(df / --output=size | tail -n1)...


3

On EXT file systems, by default 5% of the space is reserved to root user, so the amount df reports in the "Available" column is reduced by those 5%. As a result, the sum of "Used" and "Available" blocks does not correspond to "Size". The amount of reserved space can be seen (and changed) using tune2fs -l/-m/-r. Note that if the partition is mostly empty, ...


1

There is a solution that seems to fit ideal to your needs. You can use the Logical Volume Manager lvm2. I use it since about two years for my test setups on Raspberry Pi. With it you can take snapshots of the running system and take backups from the snapshot without worry about changes during backup. You can also revert to the snapshot so you can always ...


3

NOTE this is an interim copy of some notes I am writing and is still incomplete. There are many questions on this site asking how to backup a Raspberry Pi. The most important thing is to actually perform backups, and the faster and easier the process the better. I have used the following 4 methods (although there are others) 1. Create a disk image ...


Top 50 recent answers are included