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46

I'm not going to write about checking your HW and compatible SD card lists, because you most probably have already checked all these. What I'm about to write is the permanent solution, that allows to nip the problem in the bud, and permanently fix the issue. If you don't want your SD card to get broken when you flip the power switch, you have to use it in a ...


20

Do you mean a screen like this?: If you using a RPi 3 B+, it may just be out of date firmware (see here) - you need to use newer image with the right firmware such as the offical Raspbian image - older and derivative images may still need to be updated for now (e.g. OctoPrint [1] [2] [3] ) Various troubleshooting methods can be found here: With current ...


14

I've made this answer to summarize the experience to this issue. We are talking about Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, released on 2018-03-14. It has some new and updated features compared to Raspberry Pi 3 Model B. A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2 Faster Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0), maximum ...


10

I just ran into this issue myself. I found two ways to create the SD card using the .tar.gz images provided by ArchLinuxARM, provided you have a USB SD card reader. Method 1: Raspberry Pi + USB card reader + 1 additional SD card This method requires an additional SD card and a USB card reader. It uses Linux on your Raspberry Pi to build an new SD card that ...


8

The Pi's UART has a fault (in the firmware). Whenever the port is opened there is a 30 µs low glitch on TXD. See http://elinux.org/RPi_Serial_Connection#Unwanted_serial_garbage_input and search for glitch. You will need to find a workaround as the fault will not be fixed.


7

From Wikipedia: Overclocked use may permanently damage components enough to cause them to misbehave (even under normal operating conditions) without becoming totally unusable. [...] In general, overclockers claim that testing can ensure that an overclocked system is stable and functioning correctly. Although software tools are available for ...


7

Found myself in the same situation just now. Took quite some time to figure out (taking into account that I had neither a USB keyboard nor a Linux computer around this was a long quest). The reason for this problem appearing seemingly out of the blue is fsck - the automated file system check, which runs on startup. During this check fsck may discover that ...


6

For a lot of newcomers the problem is not necessarily the SD card/installation, but rather the communication with your monitor (as Eric Wilson rightly asks above). Many people reuse an old(er) 'VGA' (or similar, SVGA, XVGA) monitor with the PC-style VGA connector, and then use an HDMI-to-VGA 'adaptor'. BUT there are 'issues' with this, that require you to ...


5

One simple approach is to get a PC with Linux (even a LiveCD distribution - Ubuntu allows booting from CD for example) will suffice. Every modern Linux will recognize both SD partitions out of the box and allow you to modify their contents.


5

In addition to mounting the ext4 partition of the SD card as @goldilocks suggests, you should be able insert the SD card into any Windows machine and edit cmdline.txt in the vfat /boot partition (which should be directly available to Windows) and add the following parameter to the line that is already in that file: init=/bin/sh According to this posting, ...


5

Yes, the most obvious and straightforward way is to mount them under linux, where ext4 is the native filesystem. Keep in mind that the raspberry pi is not actually the focus of the linux world -- not including android (which uses the kernel), between 1-5% of PCs (desktops, laptops, etc), 30-40% of web servers, and 95% of the world's supercomputers run some ...


5

Finally I found the problem that is my power supply. It is not 5V output it is around 6.8V that is why color screen after that load some cord and it load again and again. If you find how to check voltage Raspberry pi B+ and B this is the Video I founded. Thank You.


5

All the boot files are on a FAT32 sector, which is readable and writeable by all common operating systems. You can place the SD card in an SD card reader, delete the bad kernel, and rename the good kernel from any Windows, or Mac, or Linux machine.


5

I had this problem too, it never got past that boot screen. It turned out it was a power supply problem. Pi 3 requires 2 A, and I had a 1.5 A micro USB adapter. When I switched to a 2 A adapter it worked as expected.


4

You'd better troubleshoot everything one by one. Disconnect your HDD, it does not matter now Get another SD card, put a fresh image on it and try to boot If unable to boot, try different cards or different OS images If still unsuccessful, get a fresh Raspberry Pi, and try to boot again Once you get your system up and running, you may get USB SD reader to ...


4

Depending of what you use your RPi for, you may be insterested in IPE, which is a "blackout-proof flavour of Raspbian". I plan to use it to boot my RPi. If I need data to be writen, I will use an USB drive that I'll mount readonly (I prefer my SD to be safe and corrupt an USB drive than having to repair my SD) See the IPE homepage As indicated there, "...


4

So after hours of troubleshooting, I fixed it by changing the config.txt. I uncommented this: hdmi_safe=1 And it worked! Was an interesting experience troubleshooting all in all! Info: Use safe mode settings to try to boot with maximum hdmi compatibility. This is the same as the combination of: hdmi_force_hotplug=1, hdmi_ignore_edid=0xa5000080, ...


4

I understand your frustration, but there is one caution in your post "system updates itself fine, pull power, wait 20 seconds, plug back in". NEVER turn off the power on ANY computer without shutting down properly. For Linux this is sudo shutdown -h now (or similar). Shutting down may damage the filesystem, and from reports on this Forum the SDcard on the ...


4

Hoarding is bad. This is most definitely a bricked pi. The heat generated indicates this has a short, and is totally bricked. I've found that repairing even the power capacitor, or attempting to revive a dead pi, can have disastrous results. For example, multiple bricked/burned SD cards. Another example, I've had multiple bad power supplies ruin brand new ...


4

How to get the TTL console working on the Raspberry Pi STEP 1Edit /boot/cmdline.txt and make sure you have the following: dwc_otg.lpm_enable=0 console=ttyAMA0,115200 kgdboc=ttyAMA0,115200 console=tty1 elevator=deadline root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rootfstype=ext4 rootwait The important part here is to have console=ttyAMA0,115200 and kgdboc=ttyAMA0,115200 STEP ...


4

Just to put in answer form. Per official raspberry pi site, the dd command should be dd bs=4M if=2014-09-09-wheezy-raspbian.img of=/dev/mmcblk0 Edit: obviously changing image name to that of your image.


4

Once an SD card starts producing errors I believe it is defunct. They generally use a methodology called wear levelling (apparently often via a 32-bit ARM microcontroller) to maximize their lifespan.1 This means the addresses the card exposes are virtual, they do not literally correspond to specific physical blocks; a consequence of wear levelling is that ...


4

I faced a similar issue and the problem ended up being my SD card. I also had no display and the similar red and green light issue. To rectify, I configured my SD card to Raspbian using Win32DiskImager and it worked. I was using the same Pi as you too.


4

It's dead. It should have been okay if the board was completely silent (blown polyfuse, wait a few hours) but you mentioned that the SOC heats up immediately. Therefore, it's most probably dead.


4

Assuming you are running Raspbian. The username is pi and the password is raspberry.


4

The rainbow square is an under-voltage warning. You might consider upgrading to a more powerful power supply (more amps, not more volts). EDIT To further answer your question I have tried to reproduce your issue. I have installed a new sd card with Raspbian Stretch and inserted in a B+. It boots normally and has been running ever since. Also after reboots....


4

/boot/bcm2710-rpi-3-b-plus.dtb is missing in older Raspbian images. Just run sudo rpi-update on your booted previous Raspberry Pi to fetch the missing firmware. After that you can switch to your new Raspberry Pi 3B+ and boot it with your existing SD card.


3

Short Answer: Buy an SD card that is known to work for Raspberry Pi and install the latest version of Raspbian. List of working SD cards here. http://elinux.org/RPi_SD_cards Long Answer (Untested, Hypothetical): I have a feeling that this problem stemmed from buying a really cheap, generic SD card off of eBay. It appeared to be trying to run raspi-config ...


3

INIT: Id "1" respawning too fast: disabled for 5 minutes Wow, I haven't seen this one in years, I guess because debian is almost the last major distro left using SysV init. Technically it means there's a problem with a directive in /etc/inittab, namely the one with Id "1". It should look like this: 1:2345:respawn:/sbin/getty --noclear 38400 tty1 If it ...


3

I found the solution to my problem. Maybe it helps for others. If you are running RT Kernel on Raspberry pi and having a problem to mount root file system, then add the following option to BOOT/cmdline.txt file. sdhci_bcm2708.enable_llm=0 It has already mentioned and solved in the following post http://www.raspberrypi.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=39951


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