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52

I'm not going to write about checking your HW and compatible SD card lists, because you most probably have already checked all these. What I'm about to write is the permanent solution, that allows to nip the problem in the bud, and permanently fix the issue. If you don't want your SD card to get broken when you flip the power switch, you have to use it in a ...


27

Do you mean a screen like this?: If you using a RPi 3 B+, it may just be out of date firmware (see here) - you need to use newer image with the right firmware such as the offical Raspbian image - older and derivative images may still need to be updated for now (e.g. OctoPrint [1] [2] [3] ) Various troubleshooting methods can be found here: With current ...


21

I connected it to the other HDMI port and the image appeared, it was actually booting but showing the rainbow through that port.


16

I've made this answer to summarize the experience to this issue. We are talking about Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, released on 2018-03-14. It has some new and updated features compared to Raspberry Pi 3 Model B. A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2 Faster Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0), maximum ...


11

I just ran into this issue myself. I found two ways to create the SD card using the .tar.gz images provided by ArchLinuxARM, provided you have a USB SD card reader. Method 1: Raspberry Pi + USB card reader + 1 additional SD card This method requires an additional SD card and a USB card reader. It uses Linux on your Raspberry Pi to build an new SD card that ...


11

Found myself in the same situation just now. Took quite some time to figure out (taking into account that I had neither a USB keyboard nor a Linux computer around this was a long quest). The reason for this problem appearing seemingly out of the blue is fsck - the automated file system check, which runs on startup. During this check fsck may discover that ...


8

For a lot of newcomers the problem is not necessarily the SD card/installation, but rather the communication with your monitor (as Eric Wilson rightly asks above). Many people reuse an old(er) 'VGA' (or similar, SVGA, XVGA) monitor with the PC-style VGA connector, and then use an HDMI-to-VGA 'adaptor'. BUT there are 'issues' with this, that require you to ...


8

The Pi's UART has a fault (in the firmware). Whenever the port is opened there is a 30 µs low glitch on TXD. See http://elinux.org/RPi_Serial_Connection#Unwanted_serial_garbage_input and search for glitch. You will need to find a workaround as the fault will not be fixed.


8

I had the exact same issue on a P3 - tried different ISOs but no joy I was able to fix by disabling cloud init via ssh. 1) get the IP address of the Pi - I was at home so just logged onto my router and got it from there 2) in windows command line on another machine login using command : ssh ubuntu@[ip address] the default password is 'ubuntu' 3) you ...


7

From Wikipedia: Overclocked use may permanently damage components enough to cause them to misbehave (even under normal operating conditions) without becoming totally unusable. [...] In general, overclockers claim that testing can ensure that an overclocked system is stable and functioning correctly. Although software tools are available for ...


7

The reason why the ISC DHCPv4 server service fails is that at the time it is started the network interface configuration might not have been finished. As systemd cannot know when a service really has become ready (as opposed to have been started successfully), the usual start dependency service unit settings don't help either. Often, you'll find ugly ...


6

You've not explained or shown how you have your batteries arranged, nor provided any specs on them. But it seems likely they are in series - thereby providing ~ 9V output. Batteries in series can provide no more current that a single battery, and even a good quality AA cell isn't capable of much more than 1 amp. And so your battery pack will be unable to ...


5

One simple approach is to get a PC with Linux (even a LiveCD distribution - Ubuntu allows booting from CD for example) will suffice. Every modern Linux will recognize both SD partitions out of the box and allow you to modify their contents.


5

In addition to mounting the ext4 partition of the SD card as @goldilocks suggests, you should be able insert the SD card into any Windows machine and edit cmdline.txt in the vfat /boot partition (which should be directly available to Windows) and add the following parameter to the line that is already in that file: init=/bin/sh According to this posting, ...


5

Yes, the most obvious and straightforward way is to mount them under linux, where ext4 is the native filesystem. Keep in mind that the raspberry pi is not actually the focus of the linux world -- not including android (which uses the kernel), between 1-5% of PCs (desktops, laptops, etc), 30-40% of web servers, and 95% of the world's supercomputers run some ...


5

So after hours of troubleshooting, I fixed it by changing the config.txt. I uncommented this: hdmi_safe=1 And it worked! Was an interesting experience troubleshooting all in all! Info: Use safe mode settings to try to boot with maximum hdmi compatibility. This is the same as the combination of: hdmi_force_hotplug=1, hdmi_ignore_edid=0xa5000080, ...


5

Edit The IPE home page seems to be no more accessible. It should not be used since it seems not to be maintained anymore. For the record, here is a link to the old IPE homepage at web.archive.org Old post Depending of what you use your RPi for, you may be insterested in IPE, which is a "blackout-proof flavour of Raspbian". I plan to use it to boot my ...


5

You have edited the wrong file; disable_splash=1 should be in /boot/config.txt.


5

Finally I found the problem that is my power supply. It is not 5V output it is around 6.8V that is why color screen after that load some cord and it load again and again. If you find how to check voltage Raspberry pi B+ and B this is the Video I founded. Thank You.


5

All the boot files are on a FAT32 sector, which is readable and writeable by all common operating systems. You can place the SD card in an SD card reader, delete the bad kernel, and rename the good kernel from any Windows, or Mac, or Linux machine.


5

I had this problem too, it never got past that boot screen. It turned out it was a power supply problem. Pi 3 requires 2 A, and I had a 1.5 A micro USB adapter. When I switched to a 2 A adapter it worked as expected.


5

The rainbow square is an under-voltage warning. You might consider upgrading to a more powerful power supply (more amps, not more volts). EDIT To further answer your question I have tried to reproduce your issue. I have installed a new sd card with Raspbian Stretch and inserted in a B+. It boots normally and has been running ever since. Also after reboots....


5

Since I found the solution myself, I am posting it here, very grateful to every author of the raspberry pi forum posts. 1. Part 1 - getting command line in the boot Error Got "Cannot open access to console, the root account is locked." error. Solution Mount the SDCard on another computer (any type). Tip: if you don't have a SDCard reader on your ...


5

I don't see that connecting pin 40 (GPIO21, aux SPI SCLK) to ground would have any bad effect. Most GPIO are set as inputs. Connecting an input mode GPIO to ground or 3V3 is normal operation and has no bad effect. If the GPIO was set in output mode and set high then it might damage the GPIO if connected to ground for an extended period. I don't think a ...


5

You can get the Raspberry Pi 4 to boot with Alpine Linux 3.10.2 by adding the following two files into the FAT32 (boot) partition: start4.elf and fixup4.dat. They can be obtained from the official repository: https://github.com/raspberrypi/firmware/tree/master/boot bootcode.bin is ignored by the Raspberry Pi 4. The alpine linux config.txt is also old, ...


5

I found what I believe was the cause, and it now appears to be fixed. Since this machine has a battery-backed RTC on it, fake-hwclock had been uninstalled long ago. When looking at the dump from 'journalctl -xb' I noticed the timestamps were all from several months back (about the time the machine was made, perhaps), and then didn't jump to the present ...


5

Try plugin your display to the other port. I spent an hour to figure out that my display was not on the primary display port and the secondary port was showing rainbow. Switched my display to primary port i.e. next to the power input and it came up :-)


4

You'd better troubleshoot everything one by one. Disconnect your HDD, it does not matter now Get another SD card, put a fresh image on it and try to boot If unable to boot, try different cards or different OS images If still unsuccessful, get a fresh Raspberry Pi, and try to boot again Once you get your system up and running, you may get USB SD reader to ...


4

I found the solution to my problem. Maybe it helps for others. If you are running RT Kernel on Raspberry pi and having a problem to mount root file system, then add the following option to BOOT/cmdline.txt file. sdhci_bcm2708.enable_llm=0 It has already mentioned and solved in the following post http://www.raspberrypi.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=39951


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