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196

For running Midori on startup, take a look at this tutorial. For DIY solutions, read on. You can add your script executable command to the bottom of .bashrc that will run your script every time open a terminal (or run a new instance of bash). Make sure you are in the pi folder: $ cd ~ Create a file and write a script to run in the file: $ sudo nano ...


96

With the Raspbian image, you can re-run the initial start up script using: $ sudo raspi-config and entering your sudo password. This will bring up the same menu options that you got after first boot. You do not need to remake all your first boot choices, just use the arrow keys to move to the menu options you want to change. In your case, selecting: ...


76

Some background The most important thing you should know is that the RaspberryPi is a strange beast where the ARM CPU is the not main CPU - it's only a co-processor to the VideoCore GPU. When the RaspberryPi starts, a GPU blob is read from the SD card to the L2 cache and executed. This code then brings up all the important peripherals (RAM, clocks etc) and ...


74

This depends on the distribution you have downloaded. The default passwords for common distributions are as follows: Distribution | Username | Password ---------------|------------|------------- Debian Squeeze | pi | raspberry Arch | root | root QtonPi | root | rootme Raspbian | pi | raspberry OpenElec ...


60

Assuming that you are using Raspbian, it is actually rather simple to do what you ask. Simply open the terminal, and type in the following: sudo raspi-config The following window should show up Navigate to boot_behaviour and click enter. This should make it so that the GUI interface starts automatically.


59

From this Raspberry Pi forum post [Edited to reflect loader.bin as an anachronism]: When the Raspberry Pi is first turned on, the ARM core is off, and the GPU core is on. At this point the SDRAM is disabled. The GPU starts executing the first stage bootloader, which is stored in ROM on the SoC. The first stage bootloader reads the SD card, and ...


52

Yes this is completely possible. However, in reality it's a little bit different to how you are thinking. Preamble The SD card contains an image of the operating system. And works by inflating this image when the device is powered on. As I expect you already know, you flash this image onto the SD card in order to create a working system. However, what you ...


46

The way that I've seen most people do it (have a look on the Raspberry Pi forums), and have done myself with success is using /etc/rc.local. All you need to do here is put ./myscript in the rc.local text file. If it's in python, put python myscript.py. This literally is "a simple solution, (like dropping my script in some "startup" directory or something ...


40

You can see bootup messages by connecting to the UART on pin 14/15 of the GPIO port Here is how to connect it to one of the PL2303 UARTs that can be found on ebay for a few dollars. I didn't need to connect GND because I am powering the RPi from a USB port on the same computer. If you just want to see the boot messages, you'd only need the orange wire. If ...


38

The boot sequence of the Raspberry Pi is basically this: Stage 1 boot is in the on-chip ROM. Loads Stage 2 in the L2 cache Stage 2 is bootcode.bin. Enables SDRAM and loads Stage 3 Stage 3 is loader.bin. It knows about the .elf format and loads start.elf start.elf loads kernel.img. It then also reads config.txt, cmdline.txt and bcm2835.dtb If the dtb file ...


37

If you have an existing OS running on the Pi, then firstly it would be useful to know if the USB device is supported. You can do this by mounting it like normal: mount /dev/sda1 /mnt If that fails then you wont be able to use the USB device as a root partition without enabling the kernel modules for it. And for that you may need to compile your own kernel....


37

Revision 2 of the Raspberry Pi board has holes on the board for connecting a reset switch. You can solder two jumper pins there, then connect a push button. This should reboot the Raspberry Pi. When you shut down the Raspberry Pi, the board and USB ports will still be powered, even if the CPU is not running. If this matters to you, there is this Kickstarter ...


33

Please note that removing the output of message can also hinder your ability to troubleshoot your system after. You may want to wait until you are in the finishing stages before applying these fixes. As of December 2016, a lot of the old methods seemed to have stopped working. I created this question/answer post because it took me many hours to aggregate ...


32

Add it to the crontab The crontab runs commands at defined times. Edit the file: sudo crontab -e Add line to file (here a python script): @reboot python3 /home/pi/Desktop/exemple.py &


30

Custom Splash Screen for Raspberry Pi (Raspbian) This is a quick and dirty solution for an unanimated custom splash screen during boot. First of all, you need to install fbi: apt-get install fbi Copy your custom splash image to /etc/ and name it "splash.png". Next, create an init.d script called "asplashscreen" in "/etc/init.d/". I chose "asplashscreen"...


29

It appears there is now a different autostart file to use located in /etc/xdg/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart To get Chromium to autostart follow these instructions Type sudo nano /etc/xdg/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart" Add the following line: /usr/bin/chromium --kiosk --ignore-certificate-errors --disable-restore-session-state "http://www.domain.com" Press ...


28

It is not possible to boot RPi from USB directly in the true sense of the word. However there's nothing to stop someone from making a mini-distro which would contain /boot and some kind of a boot manager. This could then implement booting from USB or even a PXE style environment. This could fit on a tiny SD card - 64MB cards are now available for pennies. I'...


27

Yes, there are logs for everything. If you connect a new device to the Pi then the module being loaded will show in dmesg. Eg; $ dmesg | tail [16037.102139] Initializing USB Mass Storage driver... [16037.102299] scsi4 : usb-storage 2-2:1.0 [16037.102422] usbcore: registered new interface driver usb-storage [16037.102425] USB Mass Storage support ...


25

At powerup the GPIOs are pulled either high or low through the internal resistors. Whether the pull is high or low for a particular GPIO is detailed on page 102 of BCM2835 ARM Peripherals. As the Linux kernel is started and if device tree is enabled (likely) then it will reconfigure the GPIOs according to the device tree settings. Modules loaded from /etc/...


24

The short version You need to prepare a root and export it from the NFS machine You need to configure the early stage booting to use that You'll still need a SD card for the early stage booting, but after that nothing except /boot will need the SD card. Details I've only done this on a Linux machine. In theory it's possible on any machine that can export ...


24

Loading modules at boot is a little different to running startup commands. In Debian: Add the module name as a new line in /etc/modules In Arch Linux: Add the module name to the module array in /etc/rc.conf, the line should look like this: modules=(snd_bcm2835) Or for the new systemd configuration: echo "snd_bcm2835" | sudo tee -a /etc/modules-load.d/...


22

This blog post helped me: Raspberry Pi -- Fixing your Locale http://www.jaredwolff.com/blog/raspberry-pi-setting-your-locale Edit /etc/locale.gen and uncomment the line with en_US.UTF-8 e.g. sudo nano /etc/locale.gen uncomment line by deleting leading # Run sudo locale-gen en_US.UTF-8 Run sudo update-locale en_US.UTF-8


21

This is completely dependant on the Class of SD card you are using. A Class 4 card, which is the minimum recommended has an average read/write speed of 4 MB/sec. If you spend a little extra and buy a Class 10 card, you should find that the boot time is approximately 25% of the Class 4, as it should read at 10MB/sec. Using finnw's estimate that 24 seconds ...


21

From the Raspberry Pi FAQ: You have to boot from SD but a USB HD can “take over” after the initial boot. You cannot boot without an SD card.


21

No. The Pi Zero uses the BCM2835 system-on-a-chip, which combines a CPU and a VideoCore 4 GPU -- the same basic SoC as on the Pi A/B/+ models although with a faster clock speed (which does not necessarily mean it was manufactured any differently1). My understanding is that the GPU bootstraps the CPU and loads a kernel into it. Although the kernel can be ...


20

I have run sudo touch /forcefsck but what else I have to do? That's stuff that applies more to wheezy; jessie may (or may not) be backward compatible with it, but you might as well do it the new way: Add the following to /boot/cmdline.txt: fsck.mode=force Make sure that file remains all one line. Parameters should be separated with spaces. You'll ...


20

The Rpi logo used with the default kernel replaces the normal Linux penguin(s). These indicate the number of processor cores detected by the kernel, hence on a Pi 2 or 3 there are 4.


18

The full path of the raspi-config file is /usr/bin/raspi-config: pi@raspberrypi ~ $ which raspi-config /usr/bin/raspi-config


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