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I suggest you to try out this guide: setup-raspberry-pi-for-kiosk-mode This guide starts with the installation of Raspbian Lite and then installing X11. Steps: Flash Raspbian Lite. Install X11 and related packages. sudo apt-get install --no-install-recommends xserver-xorg x11-xserver-utils xinit openbox In the file, /etc/X11/xinit/xinitrc, write the ...


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You need to trust the device you are trying to connect to through Bluetooth of the Raspberry Pi (look up help menu for list of available commands). I could only get partial pairing enabled on my iPhone, until I trusted the iPhone MAC address.


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I have the same issue with my Pi Zero board, I compiled a new kernel image and copy to SD card, when it boots up, the screen displays "Firmware Bug: Bootloader left irq enabled bank 1 irq 9", and nothing else displays. Wait a few more seconds, the QT application runs and the Wi-Fi connection also works. So I think this is not a problem for my board....


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The systemd journal is only transient stored in a /run/log/journal/ which is located in RAM and lost on every reboot. You can make its storage persistent on the SD Card so you can also query old boots. In /usr/share/doc/systemd/README.Debian you will find: To enable persistent logging, create /var/log/journal: mkdir -p /var/log/journal systemd-tmpfiles --...


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I have an RPi4 running from an SSD for almost a year now. At that time it wasn't possible to boot directly from an SSD, but it is possible to change the boot option so that the SSD will be used for /root. Perhaps that's an option for you. If I remember correctly, I used this page as a guide, but since then the information seem to have changed. It looks like ...


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You're leaving out an important detail: what kind of computer are you using to insert the SD into? Linux can read the RPI filesystem just fine, so if you're getting that error on a linux box, then the SD card is broken. No surprise to get that error on a Windows/Mac unless you have special software to read ext2/3/4 filesystems. How are you checking if the ...


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Thanks above for info on dmesg and last commands. But what I found worked best was viewing var/log/messages and searching for the keyword "Booting": less /var/log/messages | grep Booting and less /var/log/messages.1 | grep Booting. For older archived messages, e.g., messages.2.gz, zcat /var/log/messages.2.gz | grep Booting worked nicely.


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last shows a listing of last logged in users. last -x should show what you want, although not directly. last -x shows "the system shutdown entries and run level changes" pi pts/0 10.1.2.100 Mon Jan 11 17:32 still logged in pi pts/0 10.1.2.100 Sat Jan 9 18:06 - 13:08 (1+19:01) pi pts/0 fe80::1ca4:...


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As an alternative to @Ingo's excellent answer; i.e. "do not try to start a progrm in ~/.bashrc - create a systemd Unit file instead.": Do not try to start a progrm in ~/.bashrc - create a cron job instead. Complete instructions for setting up a cron job to start your program each time the RPi boots may be found here.


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First of all: I also suggest together with all others from the comments, don't use ~/.bashrc to start a still running program. The best way is to create a service with a systemd Unit file. The problem with your program is that the Raspberry Pi does not have a real time clock. It needs an internet connection and some time after boot up to initialize the ...


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Like mentioned, rc.local has nothing to do with setting PATH. Other than /etc/profile, some things are also included via ~/.profile (private bin by default).


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I use the procedure in Backup image of SD Card to backup my Pi images. This can produce a small image, which can be used to make a new SD Card. I wouldn't try to backup to a SD Card (although this should be possible as I use a similar procedure to synch updated images to other Pi) but you would be better to image to a file, which can be on any media, or a ...


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You are right - tar is the way to do a copy of your operating system from the USB drive to a SD Card, but also any other usable tool like cp or rsync or your favorite copying tool, provided you have an empty image. There is a way to just create an empty image with partitions you like and then copy the data to it. You can use dd to create an image file, ...


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With a modified EEPROM you have to recover it to factory settings before you can use a fresh flashed Raspberry Pi OS that will give you the default setup. At Raspberry Pi 4 boot EEPROM you will find: recovery.bin At power on, the BCM2711 ROM looks for a file called recovery.bin in the root directory of the boot partition on the sd-card. If a valid recovery....


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My question is: How do I configure the pi so that i can plug it back in, it boots up itself and runs the program without having to use ssh or a keyboard and monitor to login. You don't have to do anything to the RPi to have it start (boot) when power is connected - this is the way it works! You can use cron to start a Python program upon startup - this is ...


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You might try using root's crontab. Something like this: $ sudo crontab This will open an editor for root's crontab. Enter the following (or something similar) in the editor, save it, close the editor & reboot. Don't know what you mean by "It needs to stay open.", but you can edit your question if you wish to add additional details. @reboot (...


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Many scripts that need to be run at startup can be started by adding it to /etc/rc.local. You can check the linux documentation to see how rc.local works. Since it requires elevated privileges, use sudo to run the command. Be careful to add a & at the end of the statement to allow startup to occur normally.


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check this link https://www.interelectronix.com/raspberry-pi-4-autostart-qt-application-during-boot.html this was helpful for me I could autostart qt application on a raspberry pi os lite so I think you can run your python program you just need to create a .service file in the /etc/systemd/system cd /etc/systemd/system sudo nano application_one.service [...


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A SD Card has a limited lifetime with writing cycles to it. When this limit is reached it goes into read only mode to be able to backup the data before the card completely fails. So I strongly recommend to use a new SD Card and clone the old one as long as it is possible. I would keep using the old one as little as possible. The first step should be to take ...


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Standard Linux REQUIRES write access to store temporary files etc. It is possible to make an OS which runs in RAM or which uses RAM for volatile storage. These are commonly used for "Live" images. The normal Raspberry Pi OS would require significant modification to do this, and it is not feasible to just turn it on & off, so you can have a RO ...


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This is an issue with OpenMediaVault 5. It messes up the Wi-Fi after install... So far no fix as of 1/1/2021


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I solved this by moving all of the items out of the /boot directory to the root directory of the SD card, and editing the config.txt to point to the items there instead of in the folder. Looking at the Raspberry Pi documentation, I would expect pointing to the kernel in a directory to work, but it seems this does not work in practice. If you're getting seven ...


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For this, you will need access to your router: Flash a normal RaspiOS 32-bit installation to the SD card. Plug the drive into a computer and add a file named ssh or ssh.txt or SSH.txt (the file can be empty it doesn't matter) to the BOOT drive. If you want a WiFi connection create another file wpa_supplicant.conf country=GB ctrl_interface=DIR=/var/run/...


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just put an empty file named ssh in the boot folder and ssh will be automatically enabled


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