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9

This is from the RaspberryPi Website: Yesterday, we introduced the first of two new boot modes which have now been added to the Raspberry Pi 3. Today, we introduce an even more exciting addition: network booting a Raspberry Pi with no SD card For the Pi 1+2: Can I use network boot with Raspberry Pi / Pi 2? Unfortunately, because the code is ...


8

When the BCM2837 first boots it needs to read it's code from a permanent storage, most processors do this by talking to NAND flash (i.e. the BIOS) because it's very easy to do. But we don't, instead we implement the filesystem reading code in the bootrom to read a file called bootcode.bin and then execute that. Because of this we need to format the SD card ...


7

No - it is not possible, in my opinion - there is nowhere to store the code needed to behave differently. Unlike PCs with network cards fitted with a bootroms/on-board flash (useful for the Linux Terminal Server Project), even if there is an inherent capability in the Arm core there is no provision to access it - remember: much of the functionality is ...


5

There's some suggestion that while you still have to use an SDCard to boot, you may be able to do it with a single file (the latest bootcode.bin). The advantage of this is that the file/filesystem is only ever accessed read only making corruption a hell of a lot less likely. Check out: https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/hardware/raspberrypi/bootmodes/...


5

The Pi A, B, A+, B+, 2B, 3B, 3B+, zero, zero wireless do not have flash memory, they are booted from SD card. The compute modules have 4GB of flash and no SD card slot (thanks @MichaelHampton). The boot loader is contained in the SoC. We can not change the boot loader. You can boot the Pi3B and Pi3B+ from USB as well as from the SD card as the SoC on ...


4

I suspect this topic is similar to the reasons the Pi has no real time clock (RTC) or why it cannot be booted via wake on LAN. To put it simply, to save costs, the Pi doesn't have a normal PC BIOS. A BIOS must be stored in flash ROM. Adding flash ROM to the Pi would cost money. Simply storing the Pi's equivalent of BIOS files in a separate partition on the ...


4

Not with no SD card at all. The Pi Zero W uses a BCM2835, which contains the old SD card-only bootloader. It's not so much a question of the Pi being older or newer as of which processor it uses. Also, this thread states that they can only really give the BCM2835/BCM2836* a new bootloader if somebody is willing to donate a LOT of money to create a new mask ...


4

Yes it is possible, the offical Raspberry Pi site wrote about it. I don't want to write a new Tutorial about it because the already did a woderful job at it. Link to raspberry.org


4

Raspberry Pi 3 fully supports PXE network boot. Per MagPi issue 43, page 10: the Foundation had some final input for Broadcom in order to add two new features: direct USB mass-storage and PXE network boot capabilities. "Gordon rewrote the boot ROM for the chip and then provided an updated boot ROM to Broadcom, saying 'shove this in the chip, it'll work,'"...


4

Actually, if you want to install Ubuntu with a generic kernel on your Raspberry Pi, you have to use grub2, as described here. The only compatibility quirk is that grub2 may set the EFI flag on the boot partition, and the RPi bootloader will refuse to boot off a partition with an EFI flag set. The flag can be manually cleared by any partition editor, making ...


3

I had similar issues with Buildroot 2017.5: The kernel ran fine without u-boot, but when booted via u-boot it was hanging after "Starting kernel...". It turned out that the predefined address for the device tree ${fdt_addr_r} was causing the problem (looks like there was some overlap with the kernel). Loading the device tree to 0x2000000 worked for me: mmc ...


3

a simple way is to use Grub for ARM. UPDATE: It works with a help of U-boot, so the uBoot actually boots up a Grub kernel, take a look here - it's a full step-by-step guide I used when I was working with G4A+uBoot, it is not so hard to compile. To achieve the exact task you want you use fdisk to make 2 boot partitions and the rest is for your main system. ...


3

I can't comment on Anocs answer so I'll add this twitter quote from the Director of Engineering as a source of info about PXE on the Pi3. Basically it's not ready yet, but it is in the pipeline. Possibly for Pi2 and Pi1 as well.


3

Use Berryboot[1]. It's a bootloader that can install more than one OS into an USB flash disk. Berryboot has a feature like VNC to boot screen this could be what you want. You can connect through VNC when RPi booting, at this screen you can choose into OS what you want to boot. I'm using Berryboot with 3 OS installed. PiBang[2] as desktop with GUI, Moebious ...


2

What you appear to be doing is called bare metal programming, i.e. programming a box without having an operating system in charge. If you Google Raspberry Pi bare metal you may find suitable examples. http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/projects/raspberrypi/tutorials/os/introduction.html is a series of tutorials on bare metal with the Pi. It seems to be more ...


2

Only the Raspberry Pi 3 can boot from network without special software on an inserted SD Card (you need to use U-Boot or a sepcial bootcode.bin on older models). The instructions for the Pi 3 are here. Since you have a Pi2 , an alternative approach is to use a rootfs over NFS , as demonstrated by PiNet. BerryBoot (Linux only) supports booting via iSCSI or ...


2

I haven't tested this, but there's a reasonable looking walkthrough here. It's too long to repost in its entirety, but they provide an overview of the process: We download the required Kali Raspberry Pi RPi image and dd it to an SD card. We chroot to the RPi image and install/update several files in preparation for our crypted boot. We create an ...


2

As far as I know, you still need a card as your primary boot partition. If yours is broken, no USB stick can fix that. Seems you really need a new SD card to get your RPi running again. Take a look at this: http://jonathanmh.com/boot-raspberry-pi-from-a-usb-stick/


2

Yes You can boot an RPI Zero without a SD card through an USB cable connected with a PC. You need Raspberry Pi USB booting code that is available here on Github or can be installed on a RPI or Raspberry Desktop computer (PC) running Stretch. It's available since the Stretch update of 2017-12: sudo apt-get install usbbootgui Just connect a RPI Zero with ...


2

Booting with root=PARTUUID= doesn't appear to work at this time with the current kernel/boot image: root@Tree-Eater:/# uname -a Linux Tree-Eater 4.9.24-v7+ #993 SMP Wed Apr 26 18:01:23 BST 2017 armv7l GNU/Linux root@Tree-Eater:/# date Thu May 25 14:17:02 PDT 2017 However, using root=UUID= does. So I'm up and running with root@Tree-Eater:/# cat /boot/...


2

I haven't read any documentation about this, but applying a little deduction: Should it be placed in particular sectors This is obviously not the case, since all you need to do is create a (v)fat32 first partition and place the file in there. Which implies the answer is exactly that: the hardware bootloader can read a partition table and fat32 format ...


2

I looked into something similar to this briefly some time ago. My conclusion was that RPi hardware requires a vfat partition for booting, and this is an infrangible requirement, for all practical purposes anyway. That said, you can use other bootloaders (e.g. U-Boot), which may or may not buy you something. The best source I've found on this subject is the ...


2

You can pull the FAT partition out of your Linux system without a problem but you would need to do some stuff with a loader for Linux. Okay the basic here is the ARM CPU(s) are co-processor to the GPU and the GPU needs a FAT partition to load the ARM code up before releasing them. The GPU has its own FAT reader and it reads four mandatory files which must ...


1

With the Raspberry Pi 3B+ the foundation has extended the boot process. You can select different boot modes through pull ups on specific GPIO pins. You will also find hints to speed up the boot process. I don't know on which stage in the boot process U-Boot comes to play and if it helps at all. But have a look at the Raspberry Pi boot modes.


1

In my case, the FDT file provided in the firmware package was incorrect and caused the kernel to hang. When booting, the firmware passes an internal version of the FDT to u-boot, and this one worked. So, instead of loading the FDT from a file, I had to pass the version provided by the firmware. The address of the provided FDT is in the variable ...


1

The VideoCore series is quite old. At least older than 2004. ARM cores used to be a lot weaker in the past, especially for video decoding. The VideoCore was used in millions of devices, a lot of custom firmware has been written for it. The VideoCore firmware only runs on VideoCore since it uses the VideoCore vector processing extensions (this was before ARM ...


1

Not sure if this helps, but from what I've read about the design of the Pi and the use of Broadcom's SoC, the CPU and GPU are on the same chip and share memory, and on early models there was only pre-determined splits of RAM between the two Units until that was made obsolete by a new version of start.elf, so this might be the most efficient or most backwards ...


1

You do not need grub on the Raspberry Pi, but you do need to do a few more steps as explained here.


1

The hardware handles the bootloading stage on the pi and knows how to boot the linux kernel without looking at the mbr record on the disk. Therefore you do not need to do anything special to boot the pi besides having all the expected files in the /boot partition. What you are doing is similar to how the archlinuxarm image is installed, format the drives ...


1

There are several ways to interpret this question: Why does a single operating system require two partitions; more specifically: two volumes? Why does that extra partition require a FAT32 filesystem, as opposed to e.g. NTFS or Ext4? (implicit question?): What files are on this FAT32 filesystem. 1. The answer to the first is: It doesn't technically require ...


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