13

You need (as minimum): Red/orange/green LEDs ~470 ohm resistor (1 per LED) - note that this resistance is approximate, but should work for most all standard 5mm LEDs Wire A breadboard Pi-breadboard connector (hacked 26-pin floppy drive cable, Pi breakout kit, etc). Your circuit will look like the following (image taken from the excellent book Raspberry Pi: ...


8

Yes you can, I used some I bought at a computer-parts store (Maplin A39GF "Colour Single Pin Interconnect Cables" / "Single Pin Mbrd Ext")


8

You can use this I2C ADC add on for the Pi. You can then directly solder the Microphone onto this expansion board without the use of breadboard. It is slightly pricey but it looks like a good quality and well thought out design. So its Plug and play. But you can obviously go the experimental route and buy your own I2C ADC (MCP3008) chip, wire it up on ...


6

Restart your Pi, and then use this code to clean up the GPIO pins when your program exits: GPIO.cleanup() The next time your program runs it should work.


5

Pin numbers Your chip has 16 I/O pins that are divided in two groups of 8 pins each, called bank A and bank B. Physical pins 1-8 of the chip are used for bank A pins and physical pins 21-28 are used for bank B pins. Rest of the physical pins (9-20) are used for other purposes like setting the device address, connecting power and ground, etc. The device ...


5

Yes. This is what I am using, and what is recommended by Adafruit and supplied with SkPangs Raspberry Pi Starter Kits.


5

There are a range of different sensors in those types of kits. Some are relay type sensors (they turn off or on depending on the thing they are sensing). These don't require a resistor and can be connected and used without problem as shown here EDIT: (See below); Details for how they can be set up and connected can be found here. Some of the sensors will ...


5

Connect the common anode pin to 3.3 volt and each of the other pins to a GPIO (add a current limiting resistor between the LED and the GPIO pin. To Light one of the colors set the corresponding GPIO pin low.


5

What you suggest will work but is likely to be unreliable. I may be corrected by the electronics guys but I would suggest the following reliability order. most reliable, ADC soldered into a custom PCB together with the other components and soldered connections between the Pi and PCB. reasonably reliable, ADC inserted into a breadboard with the other ...


4

As I read your question, you need to power the Coin Acceptor using 12v, and reading the output using your RPi. To power the Coin Acceptor it is best you use an external power supply, as the coil in the acceptor might reset the RPi as it draws a relative large ammount of current when it operates. Find a 12v power supply, connect - on the PSU to a common ...


4

Both Pin 2 and Pin 4 produce 5V so this is expected. Pin 4 was labelled DNC to start with, but it's always been a 5V pin, just an undocumented one.


4

No (provided the connecting cable is the right way round). Even so, if you are that unfamiliar with wiring, You could connect the Pi to the breadboard without connecting the GPIO pin to the Resistor and measure the voltage. The Pi is not that delicate - the only thing likely to affect the Pi is connecting a GPIO pin to 5v. You are not using the 5v at all ...


4

I had a problem like yours and I had to attach the female ends of the jumper wires to the DS18B20 sensor like this: I hope it helps. P.D. Here is a video on how to make headers (Its pretty much the same for male pins) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEPdB-W3-Tc


4

Maybe the cobbler is not connected well, or the sensor is not getting enough power to work (the cable is too long or the power supply you're using is under-powered). Side note: you ALWAYS want to connect a resistor in series with an LED to avoid it getting damaged (I don't have enough reputation to write a comment on your question)


4

The DS18B20 is a (Dallas) 1-wire bus device. You can connect multiple 1-wire devices to the same bus. They are differentiated by their unique internal Id. So you can connect additional devices to GPIO4. The Pi (currently) only supports one 1-wire bus. By default that bus is associated with GPIO4. An entry in /boot/config.txt allows you to change the ...


4

This is not strictly a Pi question, and the simple answer is it depends. The cheap breadboards have quite reliable connectors (if not up to the standard of traditional IC sockets with gold plated contacts). Their performance is strongly dependent on their history - if they have been used for oversized wires the contact will be unreliable, as will contact ...


3

As they say in the auto industry: "A'yup, there's your problem!" Looks like the breadboard came shipped misassembled. The connections were jammed into the wrong rail. I removed the sticky back, pulled out and reset the connectors in their own tracks and everything seems to be working fine now.


3

Even though the USB port of the RPi is technically an On-the-go (OTG) chip that should support both a reduced set of host and client functionality the B/B+ type of the RPi does not support the device mode. That is related to the included USB hub and the fact that the ethernet is tunneled through USB (see). If everything else fails, there are examples of ...


3

A Breadboard makes it easier to experiment. Here is a breadboard used to connect a LED (and current-limiting resistor) to a GPIO port on a Raspberry Pi. You'll need male-to-female jumper leads. You can get by without one if you have a soldering iron and don't mind a lot of extra work. See also What kind of connector do I use for the Pi's GPIO pins? ...


3

Welcome to the world of RasPi DYI projects. 1) A breadbord is a solderless board for connecting electronic parts and wires. Have a look here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breadboard 2) Yes, it is fully possible to connect LEDs and other parts to the RPI without a breadboard. You can use only wires and duct-tape or a soldering iron. 3) I would really ...


3

You would need some kind of recording hardware (sound card, ADC, etc), as it is the Pi does not have anywhere you can just connect this to. But providing you have a suitable analogue to digital interface for the Pi, then yes, this should work fine.


3

http://cds.linear.com/docs/en/application-note/an105.pdf Here's a link that should help. Basically, you're just going to connect the inputs of an opamp around your current sensing load resistor. The app note there has many more examples. If you just have a binary input, you could choose your resistor such that the "high" level was a logic high, or send it ...


3

A common anode LED should have the common leg connected to 3.3 volts and the others connected to 3 seperate GPIO pins. Connect the common pin to 3.3v, then wire the other three legs of the LED to the desired GPIO pins. In your code pull these pins low to light the individual colors. The resistors should go between the LED color pins and the GPIO pins. ...


3

There's this, but it's pretty hard to beat a regular breadboard for prototyping. If you don't want to use all the pins or a ribbon cable you could just get a bunch of these to make individual connections with no soldering. You can also first make your circuit up on a breadboard, and when you get it how you want it make a permanent board, which would be light ...


3

It's a switch. Connect it like you would any other switch. The only thing to decide is if you want to use it as normally open (normally reads as off) or normally closed (normally reads as on). There are two basic ways - connect common to ground or connect common to 3V3. Whichever you choose it is safer to make that connection through a resistor to ...


3

Exactly, Just use it as a switch. I assume when the door is open or closed the Pi wants to know about it via one of it's input pins. Is the pi looking for a low? Then wire the switch from the input pin to ground and take a pull-up resistor to the +3.3V line. When the switch is open i.e. no magnet present, the input will be logic high. When the magnet ...


3

There are several options that very in flexibility, cost, difficulty etc. My preferred method is to use a Pi Cobbler and a PermaProto Board from Adafruit. You could prototype with a breadboard and then transfer the components to the protoboard and solder the connections to make it more permanent (note there are more suppliers for these parts besides ...


3

A GPIO callback is a method of being notified when a GPIO changes level. The level change may be low to high (rising edge) or high to low (falling edge). You can ask to be notified on rising edges, falling edges, or both. So say a lift arriving at floor 3 changes the state of a GPIO from 1 to 0 you could ask to be notified about falling edges for that ...


3

I ordered one of these and wish I got the standard Pi pin-out t-cobbler. The pin-out diagram in the book is what is needed. However, it book was tiny and too small to use. Website had no PDF so I went to the Amazon page and took a screen pic of the pin-out image.


3

Breadboards are fairly universal and differ mainly in size 400 (half size) and 830 (full size) holes or a multiple thereof . Some have only a single power rail on each side, like this one, while most have two per side (indicated by the red and blue lines on the full-size board above). As a beginner, I would not recommend micro breadboards, like ...


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