Hot answers tagged

8

Yes you can, I used some I bought at a computer-parts store (Maplin A39GF "Colour Single Pin Interconnect Cables" / "Single Pin Mbrd Ext")


7

Pins cannot be left floating, the value will be indeterminate without at least SOME external hardware (pull--up or -down resistors, etc.). The ribbon cable may act as an antenna and pick up additional noise that may otherwise not be present, giving more variation.


7

The short answer is NO you cannot use 40 pin ATA/IDE cables for GPIO on the PI. While it is easy to get cables without the blocked pin, the main issue is that each connector internally shorts seven of the pins together. This is because in the ATA spec they are all ground, but it could be terminal for your pi. I have verified this with a standard (80 wire) ...


6

You are correct: Would the adapter need any kind of chip on it? Yes it would - and the whole thing would be called a MicroUSB to Ethernet adapter! For the record the advert on a well-known auction site you linked to (which won't be around for too long so will suffer link-rot) was for a short lead with an RJ45 connector on one end and a micro-USB on the ...


6

The CSI port of the Zero W is smaller than that of the Pi 2 and 3. You will need an adapter cable to make it fit. I'd say it's rather complicated to DIY that. See e.g. here: Raspberry Pi Zero Camera Adapter or Camera Cable - Raspberry Pi Zero edition and others. ... and some nice additional information about the pinout is to be found here.


5

Since I know this will come up in the future. I wanted to do the same thing and used a floppy drive cable from an old computer. I have labeled what pins on the Pi correspond to what pins on the other end of the cable. Hope this helps someone in the future! Here's a pinout of a floppy cable for reference.


5

Yes. This is what I am using, and what is recommended by Adafruit and supplied with SkPangs Raspberry Pi Starter Kits.


4

Modern IDE cables have 80 wires (still 40 pins). Do the individual wires look very slim? Unfortunately if it was an 80 wire cable the Pi may be dead. It's not just a straight through cable, some pins are interconnected. The gpios may have been shorted and that could have killed the Pi. – joan


4

The EE Stackexchange question/answers on LM35, pointed out by Steve Robillard, He linked this question, covers the subject of LM35 well. The answers indicate that several meters of cable (including UTP, Unshielded Twisted Pair) doesn't work well for LM35. The EE stack exchange focused a lot on "instability due to load capacitance (>50pF)" Further ...


4

The maximum load on a 28 AWG wire is 1.4 amps. This is a max, so it's not recommended to even get to this point. Your best bet would be to power your Pi with a 2 amp cell phone power supply.


4

All flex cables have a minimum bend radius, under which a specified number of fold-unfold cycles is guaranteed. This radius depends on the brand, but generally it's around 5-10 mm. Here's a spec for AWM 20941 flex cable from JUDD WIRE, which is sold on Amazon as a Raspberry camera accessory: As you can see, you can bend it at a right angle with a raduis ...


4

Yes, but you'll probably have to take the cable apart to say for sure. The Micro-USB Cables and Connectors Specification / Revision 1.01 is the relevant spec document. Things which are out of spec may cause problems. Among the more common issues to check for are: Appropriate wire gauge (see: 6.6.2 Construction / p111) Good solder joints at both ends ...


4

id say that it may likely be due to power draw, your adapter(the hdmi to vga cable) you are using. If it isn't powered by itself it may be the cause of your problems, as the pi wasn't designed to power active adapters over its hdmi port, and your problem is likely intermittent as it may only occur when the adapters or the pi's power draw spikes such as when ...


4

You won't run into problems if you do it correctly :) Let's go over a few basics: You're talking about switching dry contacts in a reed switch, so you should size your pullup (or pulldown) resistor to keep the current in a range of 1 to 5 milliamps. Long-ish cables can act as an antenna to pick up "EMI", so you'll need a simple "filter" to squelch ...


3

For a model B+ or later (which includes the RPi 2), RCA composite video should be achieved through the 3.5mm port not the HDMI port. After a quick bit of research, I found two suitable products. The first is a 3.5mm to RCA converter. It costs US$2.23, but would require a separate RCA male to male cable to connect the Pi to the TV. However, since this is ...


3

You just need 26way ribbon cable. You can find 26way ribbon cable in various lengths on Ebay. 1m, 5m, 30m. That link for the 1m lengths looks like they sell by the meter, so if you order 2m then you'll get a 2m length, not two individual meter lengths. I'd recommend checking with them before you order though. For hooking up the connectors, they're simple ...


3

Even though the USB port of the RPi is technically an On-the-go (OTG) chip that should support both a reduced set of host and client functionality the B/B+ type of the RPi does not support the device mode. That is related to the included USB hub and the fact that the ethernet is tunneled through USB (see). If everything else fails, there are examples of ...


3

Yes you can, or better use a 10Amp-powered USB hub UPD: I'm using this one with a 10Amp block(the one which goes with a hub is 3.5 Amps). I've opened it and seen a VERY good base board with huge reserved potential with it. I'm using it for 5 years with 10Amp DC block, not a single problem or heating(checked with pyrometer).


3

The length limits come from two requirements: signal quality, and signal delays. A 1m cable will introduce about 5ns of delay (speed of light in circuits is a lower than in vacuum!), so if you are running at 1GHz, there are five symbols in transit on that 1m cable. It this particular case it probably does not matter (it's more important that the signal paths ...


3

The simple answer is that there is no simple way to tell. The only objective test (which doesn't involve destroying the cable) is to measure the loop resistance, which should ideally be less than 0.25Ω. Measuring low resistances is, unfortunately, a non trivial procedure. You need a test jig, with appropriate connectors, a current source and voltmeter. (...


3

One fact about USB cables people tend to forget is that voltage drop is proportional to cable length. So, if you know your devices will lie in the vicinity of the hub, prefer short cables to power them. A nice expensive 24 AWG cable 2 meters long will have the same resistance (and the same voltage drop) as a flimsy 30 AWG cable of 0.5m. Anecdotally, I have ...


3

GPIO pins 4 (+5v) and 6 (GND). I peeled back the two leads from a GPIO-to-breadboard ribbon cable and soldered to two female-ended breadboard cable leads and connected them to the GPIO pins. Pi 3B/Ubuntu Ma'te desktop.


2

Just wanted to share how I did. Found an old A: (disk drive) flat cabel, connected it to the pi in one end and the other to the bread board. At the bread board end I put some metal thread between the output of the flat cabel and the input holes in the board (inexpensive). Here one can see the metal going from the cabel to the boad.


2

I think the best way is use a lpt (Sub-D25 ) cable from an old PC it fits perfectly end you can find it in all old computer store https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=302451366533276&set=a.302451336533279.59880.300644370047309&type=3 http://shop.intos.de/ieos/images/produkte/closeup/33225.jpg


2

Firstly, I'd like to mention, this transmitter has quite poor transmission/reception quality, you'll constantly will receive some garbage, especially if you have other computer equipment working around. should have bought something based on TI CC1010 or CC1020 instead. Secondly, you'll need TWO of these to establish a communication link, one as a ...


2

I have used multiple times a HDMI to VGA adaptor, like this one. The work very well, also apple HDMI to VGA adaptors work, like this one The apple one is expensive, but the first one isn't, here in the Netherlands approximately 10-15 euro's.($15). A HDMI to VGA cable doesn't work, the signal should be converted to analog, that's wy you need an adaptor.


2

You need an analog signal for VGA, which I do not believe is present in the HDMI version of DVI, so a plain cable will never work. Converters are expensive. The cheapest solution will be another, used monitor or HDMI capable tv.


2

The longer the wire and the smaller the wire the more voltage you loose. That is a plain and simple fact. There are basically three ways to compensate for this: increase the source voltage: if you lose .4v over the wire increase your source voltage to 5.4 volts so that you get 5v at the point of use. You must measure your exact voltage loss. increase ...


2

I doubt you can power the fan from the Pi. The Pi only has 5V and 3V3 rails. You could try connecting to a ground and 5V pin but I doubt anything would happen. So you will probably need an external 12V power supply. There is no point connecting the yellow wire. It tells you the RPM (two pulses per revolution). The fan will be running full speed as long ...


2

It is possible it may work. If you plug the big USB into the HUB and your power supply USB into the big USB which is plugged intot he HUB, then the small USB into the Pi power, that should provide power to everything. Then you plug the USB HUB, USB host cable into the Pi and that should recognise the HUB in Raspian. Theoretically you will have 3 usable ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible