18

I think you have to decide what matters most to you in the monitor. Do you want: The highest resolution possible? Easy portability? A mountable screen? An articulated monitor arm? Battery/DC/AC power? HDMI/Composite input? Touchscreen functionality? On-board speakers/sound? An inexpensive solution? A warranty? The answers to these questions will help you ...


14

Raspberry-spy.co.uk lists the configuration of the 4-pole A/V jack of the Pi B+ the following way (added testpins PP on the Pi 3 for conveniance, note that according to this and this the same pads are available on the Pi 2B and B+, thanks @mayhem): Sleeve - Composite video (PP24, according to Raspberry Pi 3 test pads, though not listed in the official ...


10

I know this isn't exactly what you're looking for, but you might find this interesting. You can purchase a lapdock, made for a cell phone, that will provide you a portable keyboard and monitor for use with your RPI. Simply connect an HDMI to HDMI micro female adapter to the lapdock. They are often on sale for ~$60. Likely far cheaper than any other monitor ...


9

Following answer from reddit was helpful: The yellow-white-red ports are for composite video (yellow) and stereo audio (red and white). These plugs typically use RCA connectors. The Pi has an RCA composite video out, and a 3.5mm audio out jack (the same thing you'd find on a smartphone, iPod etc, i.e. a "headphone jack") So, to connect the Pi to your TV, ...


8

The Raspberry Pi Foundation claims unambiguously that a VGA adapter on the GPIO header "means you can use it as a secondary monitor alongside HDMI" (from here). You should certainly be able to do that via USB; for evidence of the the pi running multi-headed, see comments below. The exception, of course, is trying to use the HDMI and the RCA video ...


6

Composite output defaults to NTSC. If you got a PAL tv it wil display monochrome. Try changing your config.txt and uncomment the line sdtv_mode=2: # uncomment for composite PAL sdtv_mode=2


5

You don't need a Raspberry Pi device (or in this case, 2 devices), with all the inherent software issues you would face, plus power-packs, just to send composite video downstairs. Search online for Composite Video Baluns. These are passive transformers that can be used to send audio and video up to 300 feet over standard CAT5 wiring. You can even get them ...


5

If you're using Raspbian (The default Raspberry Pi OS), then you can use this: sudo dpkg-reconfigure console-setup Follow the steps, select "Let the system select a suitable font" and then select the font size you want. Once you've gone through the setup tool, run sudo reboot Hope this works :) (I usually use Arch Linux on my Pi, so this might not be the ...


5

I had the same problem. Everyone owns an HDMI TV except me (well, I do now). I found the following information only after a long long search. No one seems to be talking about it, so the wider community is not aware. Display Mode Selection: By default, NOOBS will output over HDMI at your display's preferred resolution, even if no HDMI display is connected. ...


5

The Pi2 video/audio socket is actually the same as the earlier B+ model. See Type of cable needed for new audio/video port on Model B+?


5

For future reference. OpenELEC config.txt file is in /flash To modify it, you need to remount the /flash directory as rw, as it is read-only by default. The easiest way to do that is to have both the Pi and another computer on the same network and use SSH. If you are using Windows, you can use PuTTY: launch the exe, put the IP address of your Pi (you can ...


5

It will be difficult, since little to no standards were employed. It was a cutting edge device at the time, almost every part of it was made for purpose, since there weren't all that many established common standards that applied back then. No matter what you do, it will involve some degree of reverse engineering. And the more schematics and other ...


4

Yes, you can direct connect! The first set of inputs you mention, the "Yellow-White-Red" is called composite or RCA video. The Raspberry Pi supports this, it's the matching little Yellow RCA connector on the Pi, next to the headphone jack (see diagram). Connect this with an RCA cable to the matching Yellow connector on the TV and you're set. The White and ...


4

You can use a USB tuner to capture Video in. Please check here for compatibility Just make sure to get one that has the extra inputs for SVideo and Analoque input, as well as the terrestrial input.


3

sorry, you cannot use composite video connector for video input, and using analog camera also seems very problematic. I'd recommend to get a cheap web-camera, 1280x720 should be available for less than $15 at any shop, connect it to the USB connector and enjoy!


3

If you there going for THE cheapest display, I think this would be it.


3

f you program a pin as an input, and don't connect it, it's reasonable that you get a mix of high and low. This is because an input pin is somewhat like an open circuit - a little tiny capacitor, actually - and when connected to an open wire, it will just float up and down according to whatever RF field the wire is receiving. You could add a pullup resistor ...


3

On the Pi you can set this in /boot/config.txt or on the boot partition on a Windows/Mac/Linux computer. See instructions in https://github.com/Evilpaul/RPi-config/blob/master/config.txt


3

For a model B+ or later (which includes the RPi 2), RCA composite video should be achieved through the 3.5mm port not the HDMI port. After a quick bit of research, I found two suitable products. The first is a 3.5mm to RCA converter. It costs US$2.23, but would require a separate RCA male to male cable to connect the Pi to the TV. However, since this is ...


3

Here is the diagram I found: In case if the image will be moved, you count pins on male 3.5"mm connectors starting from tip: Left Audio (PP25 on the RPi) Right Audio (PP26 on the RPi) Ground Video (PP24 on the RPi) The video appears as marked PP24 on the back of the board. It's the middle pin of 3. The Ground can be used from many other places. I think ...


3

Try switching the red and the yellow.


3

The raspberry pi should never be run with both composite and hdmi cables as it will never run both simultaneously and the hdmi cable should always take priority by default. Furthermore it is a very common problem that people mixup audio and video composite cables as the pinout is different for the raspberry pi when compared to something such as a camcorder ...


3

I read at https://discourse.osmc.tv/t/composite-sd-resolution-of-osmc-skin-video-output/5445/3) that Composite is fixed resolution (720x480@60i for NTSC, 720x576@50i for PAL). So you cannot change it.


3

No, there is no way to do this. While carried on the same connector the audio and video signals come from totally different places and there is no way the audio output circuitry on the Pi could possiblly generate a composite video signal.


2

You could try testing some other sdtv values in the config.txt file. Try adding the following line to the /boot/config.txt file sdtv_mode=2 Try other values: 0 is NTSC, 1 is Japanese NTSC, 2 is PAL, 3 is Brazilian PAL. I'm not 100% sure that this will actually work, considering you said that it used to work and now doesn't. But hey it's worth a shot.


2

Something you could do if you are more the hardware hacker type: instead of using ssh to control it, put a button connected to the Pi in some way to make it switch through different test patterns and a small LCD (like a 5 line LCD) to display some information based on what the pi is outputting through the given video out. It wouldn't even need a full OS, ...


2

you may remove X11 from your system or just disable desktop using 'raspi-config', then log in using ssh and send images directly to the framebuffer, images could be .jpg or .png files (other formats may be supported as well, but I haven't checked): fbi -d /dev/fb0 -a *.jpg 'fbi' package can be installed using plain old 'apt-get': sudo apt-get install fbi ...


2

In my case, the SD card, when connected to the computer, had a noob.config file. I replaced display_mode=0 (default to HDMI, I suppose) by display_mode=3 and it worked fine.


2

/opt/vc/bin/tvservice -o will Power off the display


2

I have two old TVs that I got to work using the composite connection. Both were fixed by adjusting the overscan settings. On the older, smaller TV, setting overscan_left, overscan_right, overscan_top and overscan_bottom along with adjusting framebuffer_width and framebuffer_height did the trick. I have the NOOBS SD card and used Linux running in VirtualBox ...


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