18

I think you would call them P*-Headers, where the * designates which one exactly (5/2/3/6). What you call Opportunity B is known as the P5-Header, and you can use it just like the GPIO-Pins next to it (see also this link). Opportunity A (P6) can be used to reset your Raspberry Pi: Shorten it it reset. Be careful, though, as doing this while your SD-Card is ...


13

Another option would be to use a port expander to get additional I/O ports. For example, the MCP23008 can connect via I²C (only uses two pins) and gives you eight I/O ports. Since it uses I²C, up to eight of them can be connected to the same two I²C pins to give you up to 64 I/O pins. Adafruit has a tutorial about how to use the MCP23008 (or MCP23016, the ...


6

You have a couple of options: Female to male jumper wires (for use with a breadboard), Alternatively you can add a set of female headers to the Pi and use the more common male to male jumper wires, You can use a floppy drive ribbon cable (because the cable has more pins than the Pi it will hang over the edge and prevent it from being used with a case/...


6

Hat compatible refers to the standard developed by the Pi Foundation for add on boards, and yes HAT it is an acronym for Hardware Attached on Top. You can read more about it here. The release coincided with the move to 40 pin boards B+. Quoting from the page linked above: In a nutshell a HAT is a rectangular board (65x56mm) that has four mounting holes ...


5

That should work. The data pins are not connected at the Pi end of the microUSB socket, the socket is purely for power.


5

That's not an ethernet port, it's a JTAG port for debugging.


5

According to this post you should be able to get 4 extra GPIO pins, but it requires some soldering.


5

It depends on what type of connectors your sensors have. If you have standard 0.1" headers, you can use jumper wires. Depending on the other end of connection (for RaspberryPi side you have to use Female connectors), you can use female to female (F-F) or female to male (F-M) jumper wires. They should be easy to buy on any hobbyst electronics shop. You need ...


5

The Pi2 video/audio socket is actually the same as the earlier B+ model. See Type of cable needed for new audio/video port on Model B+?


4

Depending on speed and distance to controlled/controlling devices, you can connect DS2408 to the 1-Wire interface. Each chip provides eight I/O channels. You can attach... many of them. Possibly hundreds. These are not supported by the library, but once you loaded the right modules (modprobe), access is as simple as writing right values to files in /sys/bus/...


4

It depends on the style of connector. The IDC connectors which go on ribbon cable (like the one you linked) unfortunately have rather wide sides and will only fit on a standard pin header if they cover it completely. On the other hand the connectors where you crimp individual pins and then insert them into a housing have much narrower sides and will fit ...


3

No it's not an ethernet port (and it doesn't look anything like one either). It's the videocore JTAG port, that connector is used on all Pi models since the B+ (the original raspberry pi model A and B use a pin header instead). It is used by the engineers who developed the Pi for debugging. Unfortunately it's not much use unless you have access to broadcom ...


3

If it is a 0.5mm pitch cable you could use this flex cable breakout board. If it is not 0.5mm pitch they have a multi-pitch breakout board


3

The S2 and S5 are DSI (display) and MIPI CSI-2 (camera) interfaces respectively. I don't know of any projects that currently make use of these connectors, but that doesn't mean they don't exist. The Foundation has plans to release a camera later this year, and the new opensource GPU dirvers may allow others to get displays working with the DSI interface.


3

Answer As per the comments of @joan and @theashwwanisingla I tested the module/sensor and there is 0 resistance between the + and - pins. So this is simply a broken piece of hardware. References (1) DHT11 Temperature and Humidity Sensor User Manual - Components 101 2018jan05 (2) DHT11 Temperature and Humidity Module Datasheet - AoSong (3) DHT11 Setup ...


2

The pins are standard 0.1 inch spacing pins, so you have a lot of options including ribbon cable with IDC connectors. Good option if you want to bring all the pins to another board using a single cable. Downside is that the IDC connectors have wide sides which means you must use one that completely covers the header. single pin crimp sockets. These are ...


2

The Pi hardware outputs composite video and HDMI (and can output a low resolution VGA if you are prepared to sacrifice most of the usable GPIOs). Some LCD screens may be driven from SPI, I2C, or parallel GPIO. They tend to be medium to low resolution. They use driver chips such as agm1264k, bd663474, hx83xxx, ili93xx, ili94xx, pcd8544, ra8875, s6dxxxx, ...


2

Tablet / Laptop HDMIs "usually" do not support dual (master and slave) HDMI mode as far as I know. They are usually configured to function in master mode and hence you can connect it to TV or monitor to get tablet / laptop display on TV / monitor but not the other way around. I didn't see anywhere in specs that it supports dual mode, and hence it is most ...


1

I am almost certain that is a JST connector, eBay or a local electronics store should have what you need. A cheaper and easier solution would be to use male to male jumper wires to connect it to a breadboard.


1

This laser draws 110 mA at 5V, while RPi GPIOs only provide 16mA at 3.3V. You'll need to amplify your GPIO signal to power the laser. Most probably, the black wire is (-) and red one is (+), so the correct way to wire it to your RPi could be: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab


1

This sounds completely feasible as the iPod/iPhone is powered with 5V/1A. I suggest you start with something like the Dock Connector Pinout. But I think the most problematic part will be to get the Dock Connector Socket.


1

According to my product with 6 pins too, I have following configuration, connecting it to an UART USB adapter. Seems that only 4 pins are needed, TD/RD/GND/Vin(5V) Vin is not working in 3V on my part so 5v is needed An image is available Comming from this store


1

I'm answering over some internet researches. Your product is replica of this product (I guess). You need to use jumper cables to connect it and wire connection is Red = VCC Black = GND Yellow = TXD White = RXD Blue = BL (backlight) Green = RST Probably your product will beep after successfully connection too like referenced product. Try other product's ...


1

Soldered joints ensure both good mechanical and electrical connections - fun Tak is unlikely to provide a suitable mechanical bond in such small spaces, nor is it likely to have proper electrical conductivity. However, something like the Pi Cobbler and ribbon cable from Adafruit will allow you to separate the Pi and the breadboard when desired and not ...


1

Here is a nice breakout that plugs straight into any breadboard and its already labeled so you know exactly what pin you are plugging into. Assembled Pi Cobbler Plus - Breakout Cable for Pi B+/A+/Pi 2


1

I think the normative way to avoid hassles with the GPIO breakout on the pi itself is to attach a ribbon cable and put a further breakout on the end which is compatible with a common breadboard. Here's an example. Adafruit calls this a "cobbler", which I believe is a play on "pie" and not an actual electronics term. There are other are other similar ...


1

cable should be okay, although you won't get audio original raspberry pi has rca output, maybe you want to look into that


1

If you are referring to stranded vs solid core cables there is no difference in this regard. I assume you are connecting these wires to GPIO pins of the pi? The reason stranded wires exist is because they bend easily without breaking. They actually carry less current than solid core. But carrying more current DOES NOT MEAN more voltage. Whatever voltage ...


1

You don't give enough information about what you are connecting to answer. I would use an IDC connector (possibly paired with coloured ribbon cable) for the Pi end. These are used inside PCs to connect peripherals, so should be reliable. I would solder the other ends to the circuitry at the other end, but this depends on what you are using. I use a number ...


1

It seems that these guys managed to connect a 4m long CSI cable to the camera, so assume that it would be possible to connect a >50cm long DSI cable as well. Here, you can buy a 30cm DSI cable for your RPi: AlienSpec CSI/DSI cable But there is no way to know this for sure at this point since there is'nt any displays available for the DSI connector yet.


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