4

Shared or dynamic libraries are needed at run time. So you need the library not only on the build system but in on the target system, in this case on the PI. This is different from static libraries. If you use a static library at build time, all the needed code from the library would be included in the executable, and the library would not be needed to run ...


2

Here's what I do for C++ sudo apt-get install build-essential sudo apt-get install g++-arm-linux-gnueabihf sudo apt-get install gdb-multiarch then arm-linux-gnueabihf-g++ -v to test the installation. After that, open "testing.cpp" and put in #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { cout << "Hello, World!"; return 0; } ...


2

The apt command is the Debian solution to download packages from a repository, including their dependencies. If you want to use apt, you have to create a system that is based on these packages. If you create a system with Buildroot, you can't use apt, even if you compile an apt program for that system. Whatever you want to install later with apt would most ...


2

As mentioned here the solution I found to building the 4.14.85 kernel was to simply clone the Raspberry Pi Linux repository with git clone --depth=1 --branch rpi-4.14.y https://github.com/raspberrypi/linux and then apply the incremental kernel patches in reverse, until reaching the 85-86 patch. patch -R -p1 < ../patches-linux/patch-4.14.85-86


2

I think the issue is down to the differences in the processors. The Rasberry Pi 3B+ has a ARM Cortex-A53 and the Pi Zero has a ARM1176JZF-S processor. Both are ARM CPUs, but the 3B+'s CPU is a much newer ARMv8 architecture compared to the Zeros' ARMv6 architecture. They are similar, but not exactly the same. Think Intel Core 2 Duo vs Core i7. The i7 can run ...


1

The documentation at https://source.android.com/setup/build/initializing actually does say something about the host architecture. The package names imply an x86_64 host that also supports i386 binaries via multiarch. Some users have attempted to run the AOSP build flow natively on aarch64 systems[1], but this is unfinished research. A means to build AOSP ...


1

AdaCore IntroducesGNAT GPL 2015 for the Raspberry Pi 2 AdaCore, the leading provider of commercial software solutions for the Ada programming language, today released a freely downloadable version of its GNAT GPL Ada cross-development environment for the Raspberry Pi 2 micro-PC running Embedded Linux. With this new cross-development environment, ...


1

I ran into a similar issue trying to cross-compile code for the Raspberry PI Zero (armv6) using a newer GCC 8. Current toolchains are often not built with the --with-arch=armv6 flag. This results in binaries which are not compatible with armv6 and therefore you may get Illegal Instruction error. I created a github repo where you can download a toolchain ...


1

Using the compiler toolchain from https://sourceforge.net/projects/raspberry-pi-cross-compilers/ For pizero the cross-compiler is available from the link cross-gcc-9.1.0-pi_0-1.tar.gz This compiler version is : Using built-in specs. COLLECT_GCC=/opt/cross-pi-gcc-9.1.0-0/bin/arm-linux-gnueabihf-gcc COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/opt/cross-pi-gcc-9.1.0-0/bin/../...


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