13

Use udev rules. find your device information. udevadm -a -p /dev/path/device/ KERNELS=="1-3" SUBSYSTEMS=="usb" DRIVERS=="usb" ... ATTRS{quirks}=="0x0" ATTRS{authorized}=="1" ATTRS{manufacturer}=="SANDisk" ATTRS{product}=="USB DISK" ATTRS{serial}=="SD71011000019113" Then create your udev rules file for your device. When creating rules file, use ...


13

You're right in your understanding that the shared USB/ethernet bus is something of a bottleneck. One option is to use a Pi 3 over WiFi. The WiFi chip doesn't share a bus with the USB sockets and should run at full speed. Using any Pi other than a Pi 3, I'm led to believe that using a USB 3 Gigabit ethernet adapter in a USB socket can work wonders for ...


9

Run the command on your Mac: scp pi@raspberry.local:/path/to/file . And the file will be transferred to your current directory. Assuming your Raspberry Pi is accessible through its default hostname raspberry.local in the local network. Also assuming the user pi has read access to the file.


7

USB 2.0 has a maximum transfer rate of 480Mb/sec (Megabits) Now, the actual transfer rate in the real world is far slower. My Pi 2 has a maximum of 220Mb/sec (Megabits) throughput over USB. The maxium the Pi can push over the 10/100 network port is about 90Mb/sec (Megabits) So: 480 Mb/sec (USB 2.0 maxium throughput) - 260 Mb/sec (For real-...


6

At those ranges Gigahertz comms (WiFi/Bluetooth) won't cut it. Check the Pi in the Sky project , which uses 433 MHz comms by default. Depending on your range requirements you might want someone with an Amateur Radio license for ARPS on your team. Another alternative is to use LoRA , which shouldn't need a license. Using a distributed system like UKHAS will ...


5

The Pi uses a single usb 2.0 bus for Ethernet in addition to all usb ports. A usb 2.0 bus can handle up to 480Mbits/s of bandwidth - a significant portion of that will be consumed by the overhead due to managing multiple devices, with exact numbers being hard to find, as they depend on each individual connected device, as well as what it is doing and how ...


5

The controller is a Microchip LAN9512 and the reason it is used instead of, e.g., a bunch of independent controllers is presumably: Price. Here's an example of somewhere you can buy 100 of them @ $5 each. Form factor. You may remember the Raspberry Pi being marketed or tech blogged about as "a credit card sized computer" or "a computer which fits in the ...


5

Does anyone know how much speed I would gain in the same scenario with a Pi3 (just about..)? Only if the Pi currently does this with a very high processor usage, say 75%+. This would indicate it is working hard to deal with the encryption, and might benefit from more horse power there. Otherwise, the bottleneck is the I/O, and as far as I am aware the Pi ...


4

The simplicity of these is that its a transparent UART channel so you can add as many transceivers as you like and all the nodes will get the data. You need to create some kind of simple model based on JSON, where you embed an ID, the NODE you are interested in a multi tenant environment, and the command or data. JSON is easy to read, compressed well when ...


4

If you backup a img file of your SD card, you can then flash it too the newer one like you would flash a normal Raspbian etc image. This should be a bit quicker than trying to copy all the files. First you need to backup up the image file - on Linux based systems this can be done with: dd if=/dev/sdX of=/path/to/image.img bs=4M Where /dev/sdX is the path ...


4

As a beginner it may seem a bit taunting on how to actually transfer data, or how to ask the correct question on how to do it. The reason is because there are so many ways to do. A popular way to be run a simple webserver on your "server". You can choose any language you like to run this simple webserver, python, node.js or C# MVC with API. On the node, ...


4

There are several solutions: quietnet -> https://github.com/Katee/quietnet minimodem -> http://www.whence.com/minimodem/ morse code


4

I am surprised your search did not find any solutions. How do you think computers communicate? The simplest solution is to use a serial link. For Arduino to Pi connect the Arduino's TX pin to the Pi's RX pin (pin 10, GPIO 15, RXD). For Pi to Arduino connect the Pi's TX pin (pin 8, GPIO 14, TXD) to the Arduino's RX pin. Note that the Pi's GPIO are 3V3 ...


4

To answer your last point This is a good "scenario" ? and with the announcement I am a a beginner and I wanted to start with a simple project : connecting 2 RPI together and send data( file of 60 Mo) through Wi-fi between them. I would say "No". To transfer a file form RPi1 to RP2 just use: rpi ~$ scp /path/to/file pi@rpi2:/path/to/...


3

If you only want to transfer files between your pi and android phone then the whole process is simple you can refer to this article http://thetechmaniacs.wordpress.com/2014/03/08/raspberry-pi-ftp-easiest-on-the-world-wide-web/ otherwise you probably have to hassle with the app because of bluetooth security standards.Hope this helps!


3

I'm going to take this apart a little bit: I am looking for a way to send files from a computer to a rpi without the rpi being able to send anything to the pc and therefore possibly get access the computer's network. I hate to be a stickler, lol, but you need to clarify some things, because on a literal level this is not possible. ALL network ...


3

As Jaromanda X said in the comments, a few google searches on NTFS Linux performance shows this is not uncommon. Probably the first step gleaned from several threads on the topic is to use lsof to verify which process is slamming your NTFS partition: we're assuming Transmission but maybe it's something else: sudo lsof /path/to/NTFS One thread suggests ...


3

You've chosen a difficult route. If there's anything whatsoever you can do to get some cables into the freezer you should do so. You can now do things with Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) on a Pi without too much difficulty. Adafruit have a good writeup on making a Bluetooth beacon here. While I can't say with absolute certainty, I think that you're very likely ...


3

Techraf's answer is good, and what I would do myself. However it won't work if SSH is not enabled. Here are a couple of other alternatives. You could use a service like Dropbox. or what used to be called sneaker net, and copy the file to a flashdrive, you could even copy the file to the /boot partition of your Pi's SD card (the boot partiton is readable from ...


3

Since RPi 3 uses BCM2837 SoC, you're out of luck: BCM283x supports HDMI V1.3a. Not sure what the "rate of output" means, but HDMI 1.3a runs at a frequency of 340 MHz and a data rate of 10.2 Gbps. No need to measure that.


3

Bluetooth 4 does not have the same speed capacities as bluetooth 3 + HS. The high speeds were deprecated after bluetooth 3. As written on this article.


3

satcomm module cost: $250 monthly fee: $15 https://www.sparkfun.com/products/13745


3

Here's how I do it: Configure your network services properly. You're using your PiZero as a server of sorts, so you'll want to set your PiZero's IP address to a fixed value. Once you've accomplished this, and assuming you have a DHCP server + router combo box on your network that you control: update your DHCP server (and local network DNS server) to ...


3

The default names and structure for linux are defined in the Linux Standard Base (LSB). Part of this document is the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard. Herein you find the definition for /media : Mount point for removable media and for /mnt : Mount point for a temporarily mounted filesystem. So if your harddrive is removable (e.g. USB-drive) it will be ...


3

The Raspberry Pi (all models) feature USB 2.0 ("Hi-Speed") only; which has a net data transfer of 40 MB/s at best (1); real life performance might even be less (2). Share that data rate between inbound (SSD) and outbound (HDD) traffic will yield 20 MB/s. So for 500 GB per hour that transfer is going to take about 25,000 seconds - which I believe are ...


3

I want more speed, I wanna be able to upload large files to my webpage quickly and I think USB 3.0 + External SSD with Exts4 on it will do the trick nicely. Mount your external drive to apache2 web files path. At first, find out what's the name of your drive on /dev: cat /proc/partitions | grep sd You might see something like this: 8 0 30031250 ...


3

Raspbian's main partition (containing home and everything) cannot be seen by a Windows computer unfortunately. A Linux PC would see it fine, and probably a Chromebook or a Mac as well. If you want to transfer files, you can use a USB flash drive, or copy the files to the Pi's boot partition.


3

It is very simple to create a stand alone access point with a Raspberry Pi without internet connection. So all devices supporting WiFi can connect to it and share its data. You can use the RasPi to store data and/or run useful server like a web server or a NAS. You are free to install what you want to have available on the local network. For a simple setup a ...


3

Raspberry Pi 4 supports only USB 2.0 (2 ports) and USB 3.0 (2 ports). All other RPis support only USB 2.0. RPi 4 does not support the higher speeds of USB 3.1. This is due to their hardware implementation - the SoC (BCM 2711) simply does not have the capability to support higher speeds. The Compute module uses the same SoC, and has the same constraint.


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