25

You're in luck! You should try SQLite. SQLite is very lightweight and implements a large subset of SQL. Your entire database is stored on a single file. And there is a perl API. Here's a link to SQLite's homepage ... SQLite To install only SQLite ... sudo apt-get install sqlite To install the perl API and SQLite (no need for the above) ... sudo apt-...


8

Run raspi-config. Select 4 Internationalisation Options. Within that submenu, complete: I1 Change Locale I2 Change Timezone However, the warning from perl about locale is not necessarily the reason you are failing authentication.


5

I was having a very similar issue. Here's how I fixed it: Run sudo nano /etc/default/locale Change it to include these three lines: LANG=en_US.UTF-8 LC_ALL=en_US.UTF-8 LANGUAGE=en_US.UTF-8 Then reboot the system and it should be updated.


5

As of right now (11/24/2017) you can install Postgresql v9.6 (stable/armhf) directly from the default Raspbian repositories via this command in the terminal/shell: sudo apt install postgresql-9.6 If you need a newer version (10.1, etc.) then you may have to compile from the source. Painful, but doable... Good luck!


4

"Millions of entries" is peanuts for databases (or even data files as @joan suggests) nowadays. Let's say you need to store a 64-byte datavalue (maybe readings from a few sensors). If you store that a million times, you've used up 64MB of space. Even the RPi doesn't think twice about that file size. And sorting through 1M records is a breeze for any proper ...


4

In addition to the options presented by Ingo, there is also a PostgreSQL Docker image with ARM support: https://github.com/docker-library/postgres https://hub.docker.com/_/postgres/ This will probably be easier than (cross-)compiling it from source yourself, and running services like Postgres in a Docker container is a pretty standard practice these days.


3

Scriptable solution: sudo -i echo "en_US.UTF-8 UTF-8" > /etc/locale.gen locale-gen en_US.UTF-8 echo "LANG=en_US.UTF-8" > /etc/default/locale update-locale en_US.UTF-8


3

With the new raspbian release Jessie, this can be done easily by just setting the LC_ALL value to C. Here's a link of that solution that i updated on another question. Hope it helps.


3

Just use CSV. That way you can just append your data to the existing file. That way only the last block will change, resulting in fewer writes to the SD. Once the block is full, it will never be rewritten. Maybe do some logrotate to create a separate file for every day. That way any data-corruption will only mess up one day of data.


3

If you look at the specs for the device you linked, it says that it is a "USB-Keyboard Interface" device. This means it looks, to the computer, like a keyboard. Therefore, you can write your project to receive info from a keyboard and place it into the database.


3

I tried the same a few days ago on my RPi3 with the newest Raspbian Jessie (2016-03-18). But most of the tutorials online are kinda old and didn't seem to to work for me. (Like the answer from Daniel which is already outdated and the build of InfluxDB always failed) I finally found this tutorial for InfluxDB, Telegraf and Grafana on a RPi2 on Padcom's blog. ...


3

There exist some projects out there to achieve something like what you want. Volumio is an example of that. Another one is RuneAudio. Depending on where you want to store your music, I would suggest you review the official documentation to understand how to connect an external storage device to the Raspberry Pi. I think the big challenges here will be to ...


3

Seems like an IoT question, but anyway. You should define your project better. Usually then we start planing a project, we first list what we expect from the system. I guess that you want your system to: Set up a server to gather data (you need a web server) Support multiple clients (clients need an ID) Save data from each client (you need a database on ...


2

As your research has already shown, you are unlikely to find any graph databases that perform well, can be installed on or run on the Pi. Remember the Pi (not Pi2) has similar performance characteristics to a Pentium powered computer. Most graph DB's are designed for large data sets and designed to run on large hardware (in production at least) compared to ...


2

Yes, you can use SQLite but you need to use a platform specific version of the DLL. This one is approved for Windows IoT usage and is stable. You can install the Visual Studio extension for SQlite from http://sqlite.org/download.html which enables a Database visualiser. But what you really need is to install the correct DLL or package from NuGet Run the ...


2

PL/SQL is a proprietary language owned by Oracle Corp. This is why you only see support for it in commercial RDBMS's such as Oracle itself and IBM DB2. The latter presumably pay giant licensing fees for the privilege. Any of the above could release an ARMv7 version that might work on the Pi 2, but it seems they have not. So you are out of luck.


2

Should I just go ahead and try Firebird? You don't just need a .deb, you need a .deb compiled specifically for the pi's CPU architecture (ARMv6 for A/B/+, and ARMv6 or ARMv7 for the 2). Those don't look to be available; Firebird claims to be open source so you could try compiling it (if you can find the source), but I don't recommend that path. I'm not ...


2

In the blog post linked, the word node pretty much means machine. They are using 2 different computers for the slave and master nodes. A hint is in the slave node section; primary_conninfo = 'host=10.0.2.41 port=5432 user=snaga' Where host points to the IP address of the master machine. These no not have to be physical machines, they could well be ...


2

I met the same problem when using SSH to connect my PI. I noticed that configuration in PI is different from locale settings in my computer. I change the /etc/default/locale in BOTH pi and computer to the same, and solved. Hope it helps to others.


2

I found I could use mysql workbench, but there are incompatibility issues. I was hoping I could find something better. sudo apt-get install mysql-workbench


2

Part of this can't be answered without knowing what kind of performance you need out of your database. On the Raspberry Pi, you have a couple mainstream options. MySQL PostgreSQL SQLite Flat files such as JSON, XML, or even just TXT. Options 1 and 2 will both use a significant amount of resources. If properly configured, they're probably going to be the ...


2

I've built armhf binaries for Raspbian stretch for PostgreSQL 11.2 that you can use by adding the apt repo: deb https://dl.cloudsmith.io/public/james-coleman/postgresql-arm-debian/deb/raspbian stretch main


2

NOTE: This question is dangerously close to being an opinion question, which is more appropriate for Reddit. But I've tried to cast this answer as a "here's a working example". And you yourself have found another. Having recently asked myself the same question for the same reason I will share what I know. I use NodeJs because Javascript is common to front/...


2

The postgresql project has binaries available for Debian using a repository with adding an entry in /etc/apt/sources.list as you can see at Postgresql - Linux downloads (Debian). But you will also find there that it is only available on the following architectures: amd64 i386 ppc64el armhf for the Raspberry Pi isn't part of the list so you ...


1

To find out the latest version of PostgreSQL (that you can install with apt): sudo apt-cache search postgresql | less As of now (12/14/2017) latest version (from the default Raspbian Stretch apt repo; not Jessie or Wheezy) is still postgresql-9.6, but the good news is that there are a lot of extension packages for this version.


1

I tried all of the above, and all are valid, but my solution seems to be to make pi a member of group mysql e.g. usermod -a -G mysql pi


1

Solved it myself. Run the command: sudo nano /etc/apache2/phppgadmin.confand comment the line "Require local" it will allow you to access from http://[Rpi-inet-adress]/phpphadmin


1

Use the pymssql module. Install with following command: pip install pymssql In your script you can use the following code: from os import getenv import pymssql server = getenv("PYMSSQL_TEST_SERVER") user = getenv("PYMSSQL_TEST_USERNAME") password = getenv("PYMSSQL_TEST_PASSWORD") conn = pymssql.connect(server, user, password, "tempdb") cursor = conn....


1

There is an error in your configuration file. Python, rather helpfully, tells you where. line 21 column 2 (char 347)


1

Run the following script to check to see if your sensor needs debouncing or your program is generating spurious events. http://abyz.me.uk/rpi/pigpio/examples.html#Python_monitor_py The script requires the pigpio daemon to be running. sudo pigpiod ./monitor.py You will get one report for each GPIO state change.


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