5

I would recommend that you use a Opto Coupler. An Opto coupler consist of a LED (Light Emitting Diode) and a Photo sensitive transistor. That will create a safety isolation between your motor that creates nasty electrical spikes and your precious Raspberry Pi. Take a look at the Youtube video for more detailed info https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYENAGK8qH4 ...


4

The 50 mA limit is for the GPIO. The 3V3 pins are not GPIO. You can draw as much current from the 3V3 pins as is available from the power supply. If you attempt to draw more current than is available the Pi will reboot.


3

6V motors usually work fine with 5V (other than the fact that they run at 80%..85% of it max speed). However, powering a motor from the Pi is only possible for very small motors, which have stall current that the Pi can provide without a significant voltage drop. Even toy motors are often rated for 2A stall current or more, which can easily reboot the Pi ...


2

The most helpful link on that I found is this one: https://business.tutsplus.com/tutorials/controlling-dc-motors-using-python-with-a-raspberry-pi--cms-20051. The diagram below shows essentially how the L293D works: However, I strongly recommend you use an L298 motor driver instead because the amps out for the L293D is maxed at 600mA (the stall current is ...


2

There is more than one type of motor driver board using the L298N. The typical board has two voltage inputs and a common ground. One voltage input is to drive the motors. The other voltage input is to provide logic power to the module. Typically the board has a jumper which can be fitted to supply logic power from the motor supply. If that is fitted DO NOT ...


2

From your description the batteries can not supply enough power for a sustained period. They are drained after four seconds of use until you give them a period of rest when they recover enough for a few more seconds. You need more powerful batteries or smaller motors.


1

The best solution, while obvious, is to use a separate power supply for the motors, as the raspberry pi's power supply only supplies 2-3 amps.


1

The error message reads RuntimeError: The GPIO channel has not been set up as an OUTPUT* Notice how for the ENA1 pin you make a call to GPIO.setup() but don't do so for the other pins you are using. You need to set the mode of a pin (to output, in this case) before you attempt to use it. So you might try something like this: #ImportedLibraries import RPi....


1

The circuit from the video in the above YouTube link shows how to use the RPi to turn the motor on or off. To detect whether or not the motor is running, the circuit needs to be modified (see the schematic/diagram below). You won't be using the "here > > > > > >" part of the yellow wire (as seen in your question) because that ...


1

Use a MUX or logic gate and create a function that does two things while gpio reacts differently. This way you can do that.


1

According to the information given by you, I would like to suggest the setup which will help to control DC Motor / Servo Motor with Raspberry Pi (3/4). DC Motor Control: Controlling a DC Motor is easy with a Raspberry Pi. I have used different motor driver (Acc to my application Ex: Cytron, Sabertooth) to control the DC motor, which allows the motor to ...


1

My initial problem seems to be irrelevant. I did not understand what was meant by "throttle" which is more of an RC jargon misunderstanding than it is an issue with raspberry pi. (If you're looking for an answer this link shows it pretty well.) Sorry for being off-topic! Sometimes it's hard to know when you are working from little experience. :)


1

Adding a diode seems to prevent back power, while still giving power to the motor driver. EDIT: Here is the schematic:


1

The L298N module typically has a terminal marked +5V (shown as logic supply 5V on the attached diagram). As long as you do not connect this terminal to the Pi you will be fine. I am not going to speculate further without a clear photo of the module you are using. The L298N module derives its logic supply power from the attached battery/power supply or the ...


1

You can power a small servo from the Pi provided there is spare power. You don't have to power it from the Pi. If you power it separately then you need to connect the servo's power supply ground and a Pi ground. Just connect the control line directly to a Pi GPIO. In summary for the servo + pin connected to power supply + - pin connected to power supply ...


1

Your code is likely too slow and you miss some of the pulses as a result. Try optimizing it, using a faster library (pigpio) or increasing the priority of your process. In the end, you need to achieve a sampling rate which is at least 8 times the frequency of a single encoder channel (or twice the pulse frequency): If the target speed you want to measure is ...


1

You fried your pi because the V+ is wired to PWR+ so you just sent 12V to your pi. There is not much information about this driver board but there is a thread at the raspberry pi forum and someone even made a schematic of the circuit. You can read more info here: https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=241060 Appart of V+ being wired to PWR+ there ...


1

Bouncing means you have extra edges in the signal, so the error you get from it can only be a higher count, not lower. De-bouncing means your software ignores the edges which come faster than expected, so it can remove those extra edges, or, if the de-bounce time is too high, ignore legitimate edges, leading to a lower count. As far as I can tell there is no ...


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