4

It’s not a good thing to do. At any point the WiFi network could drop, the processor reset, the SD card get corrupt. It took me nearly 3 weeks to identify what was causing me issues with my 3B+ before I twigged on and bought a power supply and not a charger. Save yourself a lot of frustration and get the correct supply first.


4

There are numerous errors in the script. time module is not imported PIRinPin is not defined. AmountMotionsDetected is not defined, set as a global, or incremented. Once those errors are corrected the script works properly. Therefore you have connected to the wrong GPIO or you are using very long wires.


3

6V motors usually work fine with 5V (other than the fact that they run at 80%..85% of it max speed). However, powering a motor from the Pi is only possible for very small motors, which have stall current that the Pi can provide without a significant voltage drop. Even toy motors are often rated for 2A stall current or more, which can easily reboot the Pi ...


3

A fully updated Raspberry Pi 4 will boot up properly and show the desktop, regardless of which hdmi port was used. Now I faintly remember this not being the case at some point, but Forum moderator & engineer Jamesh has made it clear: This rumour just won't die. You only need to use Hdmi zero if you want 4kp60.


3

I would start by debugging this on the command line using gpio. gpio readall can tell you if the pin gets configured correctly, and whether it changes the state. See if the pin changes state when you pull it to 3.3V / GND via a resistor. When that works, get back to your code and see how it behaves. Once it works, switch to an internal pulldown.


3

You can connect as many wires as you want to a 3V3 pin (pins 1 and 17). Similarly you can connect as many wires as you want to a 5V pin (pins 2 and 4). Similarly you can connect as many wires as you want to a ground pin.


3

No. The USB protocol is different to the simple serial protocol used by a UART.


2

I did a similar project with a Power Wheels Wild Thing and an Arduino. I settled on buying a couple of BTS7960B motor controllers. They are rated for 43 amps, and I assume they will work for a Pi though I haven't done it myself. Someone used these controllers on a Pi, they may have some helpful pointers. Below is a simple diagram showing how to hook it up. ...


2

You didn't specify your load current requirements. This is a critical piece of information to select a proper transistor to switch your load. Once you learn what your load is, here's a rough guide to transistor selection for the RPi: Low-side Switching - 0-24 VDC, 0-100mA: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Low-side ...


2

There is more than one type of motor driver board using the L298N. The typical board has two voltage inputs and a common ground. One voltage input is to drive the motors. The other voltage input is to provide logic power to the module. Typically the board has a jumper which can be fitted to supply logic power from the motor supply. If that is fitted DO NOT ...


1

The converter you have found is tiny and there is no way it could provide 3A. From the looks it could continuously deliver 0.3..0.5A, not more. For comparison, this is how an actual 4.5A buck converter looks like: When you connected it to the Pi, the converter got overloaded, and, having no overload protection (also not surprising for $1/piece module) it ...


1

I don't see any reason for what you describe to have killed the Pi. I regularly use UBECs to power the Pi and that is pretty much the same (apart from the output voltage being preset). As to what happened in your case. Either the wrong polarity of the input voltage was quite a lot more than 5V.


1

The "Coin acceptor" GND (or minus) needs to be connected to the Raspberry Pi's GND. And replace the voltage regulator with a voltage divider (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voltage_divider). Where Vin is the voltage from the ""Coin acceptor", I assume its 12 volt and the 3,3 volt that the Raspberry Pi accept. So the formula is Z2 = 3....


1

There might be other things wrong with your design, but one that jumps out of the figure in your question is the Voltage Regulator step down to 3 V. You don't need a "voltage regulator" per se - you simply need an interface to deliver either 0V or ~3.3V to the GPIO from the coin line. There are several ways to do this, the two most obvious are: ...


1

Note: I'm not a 100% sure so please correct me in the comments. I think you could use 4 USB hubs/splitters that would connect to 4 10A bricks. You would then get 20 Micro USB cables to connect to the individual Pis from the Hubs. Because you have a 10A Power supply, it would supply 2A each to the Pis. Another solution, if you're willing to buy a power supply,...


1

Here's one way to do it: combine two (or more) batteries in a "wired-OR" configuration. This is fairly generic as you provided no details on your battery voltages. If you want to edit your question to add those details, we'll try to be more specific. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab


1

according to https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=223399 Well, an HDMI connection will use a tiny bit more power. As for the OS itself, running the GUI requires more software, and that would put more load on the SoC, but I doubt it would have a large impact on total power consumption. And as klricks said above, the Desktop version of ...


1

I've not seen a way to swap HDMI 0 with 1 but there is a note towards the end of video options in Raspbian that MAY do it. Add framebuffer_priority = 7 to config.txt This says HDMI 1 is to be the output of the pre-KMS frame buffer. Best thing to be honest is hunt an adapter that fits as I have no idea what will happen with application software and future ...


1

The worst that can happen is that the Pi would crash. The Pi itself will run even with the warning (as it only needs 3.3V) USB peripherals may not work. I have tested various Pi models with variable voltages. All work down to 4V See Raspberry Pi Power Limitations NOTE I do not recommend this as normal practice. The risk of OS corruption due to low power ...


1

After reading everything twice I guess you got the right gist of the whole thing. Based on my experience, I'd advise against doing stuff with RC filters. MCUs are totally overkill for GPIO use as well as I2C and SPI as far as I am concerned but can make sense for 9-bit serial as (again) the linux provisions are nonsensically slow. Let's see if I can give ...


1

Your problem seems to be related to "electrical bounce" which is caused by electrons arching from one wire to another as your contact wires (or switch contacts) come close together. Basically, your computer reads multiple "contacts" before your subroutine has a chance to finish executing. The way to get around this is by stopping the loop that waits for a ...


1

I can't imagine why you'd have to 'Google for days', but I don't think Google is the best way to find a relay with a particular set of specifications. I'd suggest you use the screens and filters available on the websites of some of the big electronic distributors. I'd probably try Mouser first. For example, I took some of the specifications in your ...


1

Just in case anyone is looking for this answer: we solved it with using a VNH2SP30 Motor shield on a Arduino Uno, that communicates serial to the Raspberry Pi. The arduino has been setup to receive serial communication. We modified code that we found online, and that works perfectly fine. It can then be controlled via a laptop with Arduino IDE that has a ...


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