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Question How come the connecting wire to 12V 3W DC Pump/Motor melts down? / continue, ... Answer It looks like either or of the following: (1) You connected the flyback diode in wrong direction (should be reverse biased), resulting shorting the power supply, a 8A short curcuit current melts down the connecting wires. (2) You selected a too ...


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Two possibilites: The wires you use are too thin (what current do you expect?) There is a short-circuit somewhere, causing a much higher current to flow than you expected This can't be related to a transistor or a relay (what's your setup?) which would have been the ones that burnt if they were used out of specs (extremely unlikely for a relay). The ...


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There's nothing wrong with putting a thermocouple on the chip heatsink like this. You can still damage the Pi if the rest of your setup is inappropriate: for instance if your thermocouple wiring is exposed to ESD or it is powered by a non-isolated power supply (though in the latter case I would worry about my own health more). If the temperature sensor is ...


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According to this datasheet for the STC-013, the output voltage ranges between 0 and 50 mV for 0 to 100A. An increase of 2/1023*5 gives a measured voltage of around 0.009 V, or 9 mV, which would suggest a current of around 0.9 A. The readings you're getting seem reasonable, just not terribly helpful. In this sort of situation, I believe you can use an op-...


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What you're looking for is commonly called a solid-state relay (SSR.) SSRs combine solid-state switching of AC power (via a triac) with optical isolation (between the control signal side, vs. the load side), so they're pretty safe if (and only if) you get one rated well above the voltage and current you plan to control. I'd suggest keeping to models with ...


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One can find many more wirelessly controlled sockets in the market, nevertheless, there are also some based on control via Ethernet. Here is one example. Typically they are more pricy than Wifi-controlled sockets. Depending on the modell they offer different interfaces for control (Windows application, web interface, ...). The one linked above for example ...


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There are relay modules which can be controlled by the Pi, BUT building your own, requires expertise and a knowledge of electricity wiring techniques and safety rules. I strongly advise against this approach, although you will find many examples. The cheapest, easiest and safest approach is to use one of the wireless remote controlled outlets. Again, there ...


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