7

To elaborate the answer from @cachius: the OUI has changed from B8-27-EB (hex) Raspberry Pi Foundation B827EB (base 16) Raspberry Pi Foundation Mitchell Wood House Caldecote Cambridgeshire CB23 7NU UNITED KINGDOM to DC-A6-32 (hex) Raspberry Pi Trading ...


6

To make a man in the middle attacker with a Raspberry Pi 3B(+) or 4B is very simple. You will use an additional USB/ethernet dongle so you have a second wired interface eth1 available. Now just bridge eth0 and eth1 and you have a complete transparent and stealth device. Start with a fresh flashed image Raspbian Buster Lite and use systemd-networkd to set it ...


5

I do this all the time. Ethernet (Cat5) cable is twisted pair, which provides you with cross-talk protection. Note that the longest run I've used is about 36", so you may have to do testing to ensure you're not receiving interference at long distances if that's what you're wanting to do.


5

Lots of folks do that. You may need to add some small capacitors on long cable runs to reduce and RF interference that a long unshielded cable can pick up.


4

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B does NOT support gigabit ethernet. Only Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ does.


4

This is not a question belonging to Raspberry Pi. It is a problem with MS Windows. But because it is an often seen problem together with Raspberry Pi I will give a hint. Raspbian uses a Link-local address if there is no DHCP server present. For these addresses there is a top level DNS domain .local reserved so you can address link-local addresses with this ...


4

Here's a quick and dirty sketch to get you going. All you need to do is plug the devices into the switch, then add appropriate IP address information to all of the hosts. After that, you'll be able to communicate to/from the PC to the Pis, and the Pis between themselves. ------------- | | | PC | ...


4

I only had a glance at the tutorial you have linked, tldr; So I don't know where exactly do you went wrong. And it is difficult to follow your description. You described something and a bit later you changed a subnet and after that defining static ip addresses. And that all may impact dhcpcd, hostapd and dnsmasq and all must play together with different ...


4

I have a Pi 4 Model B/4GB serving a small office as a router/firewall/gateway with dnsmasq (DHCP+DNS), dnscrypt-proxy, chrony (NTP), and a few other odds and ends. It's fairly busy: up to 20 users at a time, lots of file uploads, three main VLANs (plus a management VLAN). There's minimal internal routing for the time being. I haven't really stress-tested ...


3

To summarize the comments in an answer: if you want real gigabit throughput you cannot use any Raspberry Pi. The RPi Zero is the worst candidate. 10Mb would be more realistic. Raspberry Pi USB's are USB2.0. USB2.0 has an absolute theoretical maximum speed of 480Mbit - though, in reality you'd be lucky to get 300Mbit - and I dare say that would be half duplex ...


3

This answer is not thought for setup. For setup look at the other answer to this question starting with Setup wifi repeater. This is mainly for troubleshooting and to show how it works with detailed commands step by step and checkpoints but without background information. I suppose you have a monitor, keyboard and mouse attached to your Raspberry Pi and have ...


3

There is a option on the raspi configurations to NOT wait for a ethernet connection to establish and just boot normaly. Its a checkbox. Hope it helps someone


3

This question has broad applicability to all outdoor use of a Pi, so I will cover it quite expansively... Although possible to use a USB powerbank, as @goldilocks notes, batteries will have to be changed frequently and if the goal is to monitor nature without interfering with it, going to the birdbox frequently to change batteries will disturb the birds, ...


3

This is a typical use case for dynamic failover. This will configure both interfaces eth0 and wlan0 and use one primary interface that you can define. if this connection fails it will automatically use the other interface as fallback. How to setup this you can look at Howto migrate from networking to systemd-networkd with dynamic failover.


3

In your netplan folder try deleting or commenting in your .yaml file the lines related to the MAC info: network: version: 2 ethernets: eth0: addresses: [yourIP/24] gateway4: yourGateway match: #Comment or delete macaddress: yourMacAddress #Comment or delete set-name: ...


2

The Raspberry Pi 4 has DC:A6:32:xx:xx:xx (Raspberry Pi Trading) according to the Raspberry Pi Forums.


2

The below script can be used to find any vendor by Mac: Raspberry Pi or otherwise. Just supply the vendor's name as it's specified in the IEEE's MAC DB: "http://standards-oui.ieee.org/oui.txt" in the variable "VENDOR" and of course replace the echo's in the conditional expression with something useful. In its' present form it's meant to execute locally ...


2

To elaborate the answer from @Ingo: please consider using the link ln -s /run/systemd/resolve/stub-resolv.conf resolv.conf instead of the link to /run/systemd/resolve/resolv.conf. This enable the "integrated" DNS stub and enables things like per-interface DNS server which could be important if you use VPNs that provide their own DNS server with non-public ...


2

After some years there have been found a solution to this specific problem with Raspberry Pi. You very clearly described that you want to have a bridge on the RasPi but this cannot be done with a WiFi client connection to the router. For this it must supported by the WiFi chip but it doesn't. For further information about this look at Raspberry Pi WiFi to ...


2

@Giovanni - not sure if you have resolved the issue connecting your RPi3 to your Macbook Air. I had the same issue but I'm using RPi3B+ and Macbook Pro (2015) using thunderbolt-ethernet adapter. Here's what I did to successfully connect my RPi3B+ to my Macbook Pro via the thunderbolt-ethernet adapter. 1. In the System Preferences > Network > ...


2

As far as I see you want to execute a bash script at startup that only runs about 3 minutes and that accesses a remote web site. So main condition is that the network must be online. We check this with the network-online.target. To have a clean starting point I suggest to start over again with a fresh flashed Raspbian Stretch Lite. Then create a new service ...


2

To have an answer, here is a compilation from the comments. Having a wired ethernet connection and no HDMI cable may help to get cooler, but the big factor is going to be the ambient air temp where its being placed, and how much airflow its gets. The pi will throttle itself and even shutdown if the core themp gets to high. I would put it in place and run it ...


2

I don't foresee any operations that should make it heat up though, just wanting to look after it You are probably being paranoid. Pi's are made to run 24/7, and like most other computers, there are some built-in defences against overheating: The firmware will throttle the CPU when it exceeds 80℃. Further, chips in general are rated in such a way that ...


2

Here is a small bash script that you can call with cron, for example every 30 seconds. #!/bin/bash COUNT=3 INTERVAL=1 for ((i=COUNT; i>0; i--)); do /bin/ping -c1 -n 8.8.8.8 >/dev/null 2>&1 [ $? -eq 0 ] && exit 0 sleep $INTERVAL done /sbin/reboot This will look $COUNT times if ping returns without error. If so the script ...


2

I suspect the HAT you're looking for is the PiJack HAT, although intended for the Pi Zero I see no reason why it couldn't be persuaded to work on your Pi 3. Otherwise you may need to roll-your-own HAT using something like an ENC28J60 to give you an ethernet port over SPI and then implement some drivers. Finally, a controversial suggestion: have you thought ...


2

Jeff Geerling has published some test results here, and has measured approx. 224 Mbps using iperf. I can't explain why your results don't match his, but a thorough reading of his results may suggest something to you. Other than cabling issues, two potential limitations could be: The USB bus is not dedicated to Ethernet: i.e. if you are using the USB for ...


2

I wanted to update this with what I found to work in case any lost and weary Googlers are running into this issue. Thanks to @Ingo for the link references metrics. I had no luck in adjusting the metric values for each connection, although this is due to my limited understanding of how internet connections work under the hood. After some other searching, ...


2

Seems there are to many components that have to play together: dhcpcd, ifupdown, hostapd and maybe dnsmasq and bridge-utils. I have a suggestion to reduce complexity with using systemd-networkd. It is available by default on Raspbian and has everything built-in, no need to install any additional helpers. Here is a setup with a bridge that I have tested for ...


2

First there is no need to worry about the used ethernet cable. It doesn't matter if you use a straight forward or a cross over cable. Nearly all devices since years are able to detect this including Raspberry Pi. Because it is unclear what you want to do, I can only give some general ideas. What does it mean "sending a datastream"? Do you want to send data ...


2

If you have dnsmasq installed you can verify with: sudo netstat -laputeno|grep 67 If it is the case: sudo systemctl disable dnsmasq sudo systemctl stop dnsmasq sudo systemctl start isc-dhcp-server should work


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