8

If you dare, you can implement PCI-E x1 with six pins: SM_SCL, SM_SDA (go to I2C bus as SMBus signal), PCIE_IRQ (open drain, shared by all cards), PCIE_CLK (Derive into differential signal with external circuitry, shared by all cards), PCIE_Tx (Derive into differential externally, one per channel) and PCIE_Rx (Derive from differential signaling externally, ...


6

This now seems to be possible using a PiZero - see http://pi.gbaman.info/?p=699 for more.


6

sudo apt install lynx Then use lynx https://example.com/example.zip Or without installing anything extra wget https://example.com/example.zip or curl https://example.com/example.zip


4

Raspberry Pi is limited in bandwidth due to the USB ports and Ethernet sharing a single 480mbps USB2 host port. See: http://www.mikronauts.com/raspberry-pi/raspberry-pi-2-usb-hard-drive-and-adapter-tests/ http://www.mikronauts.com/raspberry-pi/raspberry-pi-2-nas-experiment-howto/


4

I managed to resolve my issue by not using the configuration file I used in my original post. I used the original (you can restore yours to default by copying a copy of the original from /usr/share/samba/smb.conf) and made two modifications, detailed below: ####### Authentication ####### # "security = user" is always a good idea. This will require a Unix ...


4

I love the Pi, but I have to tell you it doesn't hold the fastest IO in the market. According to this article on the USB performance there is a empiric limit of 30MB/s transfer rate on the USB port. And all the USB ports use the same IO interface. As that, the limit of all combined USB should be capped on that 30MB/s limit. If you take a look at some HD ...


4

You have an average of 300 KB/s using Samba, this translates to an average of 2,45 Mb/s which is in the same range of speed as what you measured with iperf. So even though, you could have USB bandwidth competition between you WiFi dongle and the USB disk, this does not seem to be the case. Your WiFi dongle is reporting good signal quality (e.g. low ...


4

Solved. I was missing leading / vers=1.0 may have helped Drive had two logical names. S-Drive wasn't working. Seagate was. Use: sudo mount --verbose -o username=John,password=********,vers=1.0 //192.168.1.1/Seagate /home/pi/SEAGATE/share/


4

Interestingly the power consumption of modern HDD is pretty low and comparable with an Rpi. https://www.pidramble.com/wiki/benchmarks/power-consumption suggests Rpi 3B is around 2W. https://www.quora.com/Do-SSDs-use-more-or-less-power-than-HDDs-and-by-how-much suggests WD Blue 500G is around 1.4W when active, idle 55mW, sleep .13mW So power consumption is ...


3

There are a couple of things here. In the first place, hdparm measures the raw performance of your hard drive. Going through a USB 2 connection, this is about what you would expect. But you mention the hard drive has been formatted using NTFS. Access to this filesystem can sometimes go really slow on Ubuntu/Debian. There is a good answer here https://...


3

Found this script which is supposed to provide unofficial support for CrashPlan on the Raspberry Pi: http://pastebin.com/K3xGa28g Edit: Here are some more related resources that would probably be useful for using CrashPlan on the RPi: These first 2 come from this thread: http://www.raspberrypi.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=5398 This script was used ...


3

NFS uses IP/Hostname based security so that means you should give permission on NFS server to clients. Permissions should be defined at /etc/exports file. Example /etc/exports file: # Path Client IP (options) /BACKUP/DATA 192.168.1.4(rw,no_root_squash,sync,crossmnt,fsid=1) /BACKUP/MOVIES 192.168.1.6(rw,no_root_squash,sync,crossmnt,fsid=1) After ...


3

there are several things here, although the physical ethernet connection is 100Mbits/s the ethernet chip is hung off of a usb bus that is shared with other devices, so as quoted above the maximum actual throughput is about 60Mbits/s. secondly because ethernet uses whats known as 8/10 encoding for error detection/correction the maximum throughput in bytes is ...


3

SMB transfer speeds can be quite disappointing, especially when handling lots of small files. Then again, an RPi might not be the best choice as a NAS/file server in the first place. Still, just 1 MB/s is quite slow, even when using SMB as transfer protocol. RPi 3 Model B uses its USB 2.0 hub to handle ethernet, and thus your network shares its bandwidth ...


3

I do not understand why VSFTPD, ProFTPD, PureFTPD should not work. They all are available from the default Raspbian repository. You should be able to just install one of them, configure and run it. But anyway, if you use default Raspbian Stretch then there is no need to install any FTP server. ssh has a sftp server module that is installed by default: rpi ~...


2

The Pi Zero and Pi Zero W are now available and support the Gadget interface (Kernal.org, linux-sunxi.org) allowing several different profiles, including USB Mass Storage and virtual networking. The closest solution to the OP's request is to use a networking protocol between the Pi and the host PC, and then some other form of networking protocol from the Pi ...


2

You may be interested in IOSchedulingPriority and to some extend IOSchedulingClass and Nice systemd parameters. First one sets ionice priority for your service (0 is the highest, 7 is the lowest), second sets scheduling class -you can choose from none, realtime, best-effort or idle (realtime may be interesting for you if you want to elevate the priority). ...


2

I used both, NFS and SMB. NFS to connect the RPI with my Ubuntu Laptop and SMB for my Windows Desktops. Both are working stable and fast. With SMB I got read rates about 10-11mb/s and with NFS only about 7-8mb/s. In my opinion SMB was also easier to configure.


2

What is the output of executing this (on the Pi)? ls -l /home/pi/minecraft If the folder is, e.g., owned root and not world writable, regular users cannot place anything there.


2

I want to put a Server with Raspberry Pi SD Card image and synchronize a lot of Raspberry Pi with this image. In this sense, if I update this main image on server in few minutes or hour get all my Raspberries synchronized. If you mean, an .img file containing everything then no, since: In order to sync with a networked system, the pi actually has to be ...


2

In theory, any GNU/Linux derived computer with the appropriate hardware can be configured to do what you need. However, you would need to take into account the specifics of the R/P. The main one is that you connect to WiFi using a USB dongle. You also connect the hard disk using a USB connection. Both these connections go through the R/P's internal USB hub. ...


2

By default, samba will create a share for the user you log in as corresponding to that user's home directory. Since you're logging in as user pi, that's the "extra" share you're seeing. If you want to disable this behavior, look for a [homes] section in your /etc/samba/smb.conf and comment that entire section out by prefacing each line with '#', or just ...


2

It is possible to do but you will gain nothing on it because javascript on a html page will always run on the client.


2

The Rpi has a better CPU and far more RAM, but the WR1043ND has got gigabit Ethernet. Depending on which file sharing protocol you plan to use (samba, nfs, ...) one could be better than the other. The router is a good option to try, since it's probably already an always on device anyway. About the performance, installing and trying a file server on both ...


2

Yes, even if they are not spinning, they consume power to keep the drive mounted and be able to communicate with the HDD. This schould be not an issue. In the domain of SBCs the more important thing is that each time they have to spin up the HDD for access, they consume a high peak current. USB 3.0 spec allows for up to 900mA. Depending on your power supply, ...


2

Answers: Yes - Samba is a good choice for what you want to do. There are many good resources for setting up Samba, here's one I created The main alternative for Samba is NFS. Each has its pros and cons. I use Samba because I'm more familiar with it. You can research the tradeoffs by doing a search like this one. Caveats There's a fair amount of effort ...


1

Yes, you can do this. There are many guides on configuring various servers that you can locate with a bit of googling. You'll need SATA-USB adapters for the drives and likely a powered USB hub. Fans are probably not required, and a lego case should be fine, so long as there is adequate ventilation. If you can be more specific about what you are trying to do, ...


1

Yes it is. What you want to setup is a NAS (Network Attached Storage) that is accesible for Windows machines. So the server you want to install and run is samba. See elinux for more insight.


1

According to this article you can add support for HFS+ (Apple's proprietary file system for MacOS) by executing the following command on Raspbian: sudo apt-get install hfsplus hfsutils hfsprogs Without any additional work this may result in the file system being mounted read-only which may not be a problem is you are just interested in reading the existing ...


1

Hmm, I got much faster reads from 4x USB drives as a raid than a single. I currently have a raid 0 of old HDD's running MySQL server at the moment, and it moves through data pretty quickly. For some reason writes seem a bit slower than I expected. But reads are PDQ. I haven't done any side by side tests though.


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