97

EDIT: Since this post was written, the advice has changed. rpi-update should not be used unless specifically advised to by an RPi engineer / beta-testing. It is an unstable version of the firmware. It used to be necessary for updates but isn't anymore. See this answer on another question. What is the GPU firmware and kernel? The kernel is responsible for ...


88

"In normal circumstances there is NEVER a need to run rpi-update as it always gets you to the leading edge firmware and kernel and because that may be a testing version it could leave your RPi unbootable". https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?p=916911#p916911 Even the rpi-update documentation now warns "Even on Raspbian you should only use this ...


31

The license enables you to decode and encode (where applicable) the mentioned media types using the built in hardware encoders/decoders. H.264 Encode is enabled in the latest version (Included in Pi Price) which is great! For an extra £2.40 you can watch MPEG2 video, ie DVD's are encoded in MPEG2! For an extra £1.20 you can decode VC-1 video, ie ...


24

raspbian package repo contains raspberrypi-bootloader package which contains firmware, kernel and kernel modules that rpi-update downloads. The version is not the latest, but files should be fine and stable. Now it shows a 20130902 version, so it's about 2 months old. The package is installed by default and is updated when a new version arrives in repo. So ...


22

You can check the GPU's firmware version by entering the following on the command line: sudo /opt/vc/bin/vcgencmd version


21

No. The Pi Zero uses the BCM2835 system-on-a-chip, which combines a CPU and a VideoCore 4 GPU -- the same basic SoC as on the Pi A/B/+ models although with a faster clock speed (which does not necessarily mean it was manufactured any differently1). My understanding is that the GPU bootstraps the CPU and loads a kernel into it. Although the kernel can be ...


20

Have a look at Hexxeh's RPi-Updater. It's specifically built for upgrading the firmware and kernel. https://github.com/Hexxeh/rpi-update If you're running Arch Linux then the updates will be a part of your regular pacman -Syu as they exist in the official RPi repositories.


18

From Raspberry Pi 2 - FAQ and collated answers Do I still need CODEC licences? Yes, if you want to use the HW decoders. However, the higher speed of the device MIGHT mean a SW decoder can be used. This will depend on the resolution of the video you are trying to display.


14

Short answer: firmware is programmed into the chips on the Raspberry Pi, and there really is no BIOS. Expanded answer from here: The firmware is closed-source proprietary code programmed into the SoC (System on a Chip) processor, which cannot be modified. Upon power-up the firmware will initiate a bootloader on the SD card. I do not believe that ...


13

To update your system to latest versions of the userland software you need to run the update before the upgrade - the update actually downloads the new package listings so that upgrade can go get them and install them (as explained in Debian Linux documentation): sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade Furthermore you may need to run a dist-upgrade to ...


13

I figured out which kernel version I installed by looking at /proc/version: [kevin@raspberrypi tmp]$ more /proc/version Linux version 3.2.27+ (dc4@dc4-arm-01) (gcc version 4.7.2 20120731 (prerelease) (crosstool-NG linaro-1.13.1+bzr2458 - Linaro GCC 2012.08) ) #250 PREEMPT Thu Oct 18 19:03:02 BST 2012 I followed scruss' suggestion to use rpi-update. I ...


11

Meanwhile the kernel is part of the raspberrypi-kernel-package in Raspbian. So rpi-update is not needed anymore to update the kernel. There are two kernels in the package, that means it works on every hardware-version of the Pi (ARMv6, ARMv7 and ARMv8 Just use this fancy one-liner to keep your Pi up-to-date: apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade ...


9

The answer marked as correct is in fact outdated, and in a problematic way: rpi-update will update the firmware to the latest published version, which has to be considered "not stable". So following the recipe given you might end up with an unstable system (has happened to me ;) ).


9

Look at the lesson Baking Pi – Operating Systems Development. It's an ARM-only lesson, but it uses pieces of C for the USB driver.


9

NO. The RPi3 is still based on the VC4, which requires the loading of the closed-source BLOB before the Linux kernel is ran. But is this really any different from a low-level closed source BIOS that many of the other SBC use?


8

"In normal circumstances there is NEVER a need to run rpi-update as it always gets you to the leading edge firmware and kernel and because that may be a testing version it could leave your RPi unbootable". https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?p=916911#p916911 Even the rpi-update documentation now warns "Even on Raspbian you should only use this ...


7

I don't use Raspian, but unless they've deviated significantly from Debian in their package management, aptitude update followed by aptitude upgrade, as you've done, should update the packages on the system. You could also try aptitude dist-upgrade. I don't know if that will update the Kernel image or not, but I suspect that it will not. For the kernel, ...


7

You can remove all of that to satisfy vrms, if that's all it complains about. However, the real RMS would, I am certain, inform you that there is no way to make the pi truly free, since it requires some proprietary firmware in order to boot. I mention this because it is always possible that in the future the virtual will become more real, in which case you ...


6

rpi-update updates the firmware for the Raspberry Pi. It does not change any packages. apt-get update updates the package listings for the Debian operating system, but does not upgrade the packages themselves. apt-get upgrade upgrades any packages that have new versions. You usually run this after you run apt-get update. Note: for these commands to do ...


5

The license enables playing MPEG2 content on the RPi with hardware acceleration. Without the license it will not play the file. The license is a key associated with the serial number of the RPi. Hope this clears the doubt. More information available at Rpi site under Codec license


5

Firmware image contains couple of components. There are couple files that creates bootloader (start.elf, bootcode.bin, loader.bin) and couple of kernel images (normal, emergency and cutdown). There is no source available to bootloader files so every Linux distribution is using the same files. They may differ in which versions are they using. Kernel, on the ...


5

Finally I found the problem that is my power supply. It is not 5V output it is around 6.8V that is why color screen after that load some cord and it load again and again. If you find how to check voltage Raspberry pi B+ and B this is the Video I founded. Thank You.


4

One thing to note: In Australia and other parts of the world, Live TV is MPEG2. You won't be able to view Live TV on the Pi without either adding software codecs or buying a licence. (i.e. Video won't display; Audio will work as it's AC3). So if your country uses MPEG2 Video and you plan on watching Live Tv on the Pi, buy a licence with your Pi... dsicovered ...


4

You can check the kernel version like this: uname -a Linux RPi 3.1.19 #1 PREEMPT Fri Jun 1 14:16:38 CEST 2012 armv6l GNU/Linux And the GPU firmware with: /opt/vc/bin/vcgencmd version May 31 2012 13:35:03 Copyright (c) 2012 Broadcom version 317494 (release)


4

Raspberry Pi ARM based bare metal examples is another good reference. First you'll need to learn how the Raspberry Pi operates, how it boots, what's needed to get your code running without an existing operating system and so on - the README gives you a lot of information.


4

See http://wiki.beyondlogic.org/index.php?title=Understanding_RaspberryPi_Boot_Process The GPU is responsible for booting the system. It loads the first stage bootloader from a ROM. The first stage bootloader loads the second stage bootloader (bootcode.bin) from the SD Card. The second stage bootloader (bootcode.bin) executes on the GPU and loads the third ...


4

GPU requires a non-free binary blob. Moreover, unlike on desktop computers, you cannot avoid using it even if you do not need graphics at all – due to design, Raspberry Pi just would not start without that blob. Since it’s quite large for firmware: about 2 Mb¹ (in binary form, of course), I doubt, that it would be been legally reversed some day and thus ...


4

Debian seems to think not: "The Raspberry Pi boots from its GPU and only non-free software is currently available for the GPU, even starting the machine requires a large (2MB) blob of non-free, unsupportable software" You can definitely dump java and wolfram. I get rid of those right away. As to the drivers, it might be easiest just to duplicate your card ...


4

While the Raspberry Pi 2 support is present in 4.5, you're also looking for a .config that will work. The changes for multi_v7_defconfig weren't ready for 4.5, so they're currently in linux-next. That defconfig is still missing a couple of things: CONFIG_BCM2835_WDT=y (enables reboot/shutdown) CONFIG_SND_BCM2835_SOC_I2S=y (support for external audio DACs, ...


4

"Do I still need rpi-update if I am using the latest version of Raspbian?" I don't know how often people need to be told, or why they ignore the warning if they do run it! "In normal circumstances there is NEVER a need to run rpi-update as it always gets you to the leading edge firmware and kernel and because that may be a testing version it could leave ...


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