3

I forgot to check, but it seems there is actually a package for gnuradio in Raspbian wheezy: http://archive.raspbian.org/raspbian/pool/main/g/gnuradio/ So you should be able to install the package by running: sudo apt-get install gnuradio If you want do develop using gnuradio, make sure to also install gnuradio-dev and maybe also the different libgnuradio*...


3

The gnuradio 3.7 packages you see at http://archive.raspbian.org/raspbian/pool/main/g/gnuradio/ are not included in the index for wheezy. They are for jessie, so I suppose these packages are only available and built for jessie


2

Obviously you can access the web, so you can download and install the .deb package yourself: wget http://archive.raspbian.org/raspbian/pool/main/g/gnuradio/gnuradio_3.7.0-5_armhf.deb dpkg -i gnuradio_3.7.0-5_armhf.deb Of course, you need to take care of dependencies first -- at least some of the libraries in that directory will be required too. To find ...


2

The RP does not have a strong Floating points support It has single precision hardware acceleration, if you use a distro compiled for it, which there are more than a few now. Looking at this, I don't see any reason why the pi should not handle openBTS ("...basically, any computer should do the work. The only thing which is really required is a USB port...")...


2

I successfully built & installed GnuRadio following the instructions here: http://www.hamradioscience.com/raspberry-pi-as-remote-server-for-rtl2832u-sdr/ I don't recall there being any particular trick to it, but if you get stuck, post up any errors here and I'll see if it jogs my memory. Consensus seems to be that the Pi isn't powerful enough to do ...


1

although it is just about possible to use OpenBTS with a Raspberry Pi version 1, the software required some careful fine tuning and, given the compute intensive nature of such software-defined radio (SDR) applications, it is far from practical. using Pi 2, with not only 4x ARM cores but NEON SIMD extensions — which come in very handy for digital signal ...


1

Well, I think the home made cheapie radio astronomy telescopes described in the articles you referred are the cheapest toys you can find. What Rpi can help is at the final output stage, doing the ADC and DigiPot jobs as shown in the following picture: You can find dirt cheap 10/12/16/24 bit low noise ADC and POT modules from AliExpress or Amazon. What ...


1

The objective is receiving the data from the Ground module to air module and decoding it without a controller board such as PX4 or Navio. Start with loopback test on the RPi4. Connect the Tx pin of the RPi4 to the Rx pin of the RPi4 with a jumper wire. Install cutecom/minicom/putty on RPi4 to test the loopback. I used minicom to do the loopback test. The ...


1

I seems the event chaining doesn't work, even when using the --delay switch for the key command. Issuing two separate commands works: #!/bin/bash xdotool search --onlyvisible --classname gqrx windowactivate sleep 1 xdotool key ctrl+d


1

Most transceivers are proprietary, so I'm not really sure if CubeSat modules (link) are compatible with a Pi. They might help you out if you buy one. I suggest using another platform other than a Pi. I'm not sure if it's fit for orbiting at that height unprotected. Also, its components aren't really rated for radiation. ECC memory would also be a plus. If ...


1

It seems you are going to build some sort of packet radio system on CB-frequencies. I think it is perfectly legal in many countries, although you should consider local laws.9600 bps is not easy to get at distances you are thinking, but it is not impossible. Depending of terrain you might need quite tall antennas. If you are going to send/receive email, ...


1

Is there a way to run a GUI application (GNURadio in this case) from [a virtual console]? I've replaced "command line" here with VC (sometimes VT, virtual terminal), because that's what you are referring to. You can of course start a GUI application from the command line in a terminal emulator on a running GUI desktop. The nomenclature here can be ...


1

Now here's something I haven't come across in ages, but I do remember a bit of software that would do this. Found it. Streamripper is designed to rip streams to MP3 files, but more importantly also create a relay server (the -r) argument. You can use the relay feature to listen on more than one system. On the downside you'll have to have a system with some ...


1

OK. You can do this by adding a few commands to /etc/rc.local: amixer cset numid=3 1 # force audio through the headphone jack ogg123 -@ /home/pi/radiocampus_local.m3u # start playing music! You may also need to edit /boot/config.txt so that hdmi_drive=0 to ensure audio comes out the 3.5 mm jack. This assumes that your network is configured correctly, of ...


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