Hot answers tagged

9

You can reset USB bus via this C program. https://gist.github.com/x2q/5124616 Download C code from github wget -c --no-check-certificate https://gist.githubusercontent.com/x2q/5124616/raw/3f6e5f144efab2bc8e9d02b95b8301e1e0eab669/usbreset.c -O usbreset.c Compile C code as usbreset cc usbreset.c -o usbreset Give execute permission to program chmod +x ...


8

You could use a command line utility Gammu. Check out http://wammu.eu/gammu/ Or you can follow this tutorial to interface with the modem directly to send and receive sms on your Raspberry Pi: http://myraspberryandme.wordpress.com/2013/09/13/short-message-texting-sms-with-huawei-e220/


5

For the default use of them that is not possible with GPRS/EDGE/3G/HSDPA/4G dongles. They are designed for data only. But as pointed out by the OP there does seem to some development for Huawei dongles. What it requires though: Check if the dongle supports voice. Some microchips have the audio processor built in with everything else but the firmware ...


5

You could: utilize a couple of USB to serial adapters like this one. you could use a microcontroller that has multiple serial ports (e.g. arduino mega) to gather the data and transfer it to the Pi, or you could get a serial to I2c or spi adapter that connects to the GPIO pins. More info can be found in this thread.


4

If the content of the message comprises only characters 0-9 A-F then the message is in all likeliness encoded in hexadecimal. If you copy and paste the message payload into a utility that translate hexadecimal to ASCII you might be pleasantly surprised with a message.


4

This looks like the SIM800 GSM chip. This needs to be connected to the serial port (UART) on the Raspberry Pi (make sure that the voltage levels on the SIM 800 and RPi pins are the same or you'll end up bricking either or both the devices). Once that is done, you will have to use the "AT Commands" to write a program that communicates with the SIM800 over ...


3

I had to do something similiar for a project, where either restricted Wlan or a 3G Stick was used to connect to the internet. The magic to connect in such networks is that connections to the pi are impossible to establish, because of the NAT network, but rather make the Pi connect a server. I went with a HTTP Server and the Pi polling it every 5 minutes ...


3

The circuit quite clearly shows that it runs off 5V. It also appears to have provision for external power. The link is quite old (it was obviously designed for a Model B) and the Pi has changed since. The 26 pin header should fit over the 1st 26 pins of the Pi2, although the later Pi changed the physical position of the pins (by a small amount) so it won't ...


3

The link to the tutorial you posted answers your second question for automating the connection. Edit the /etc/network/interfaces file by executing: sudo nano /etc/network/interfaces Then add the following lines to the file: auto fona iface fona inet ppp provider fona This configuration will tell your device to bring up the FONA PPP peer ...


3

If you use a recent version of raspi-config, you will find there is an option to prevent taking over the serial port as a console. Then it is free for you to use as a regular serial port https://www.cube-controls.com/2015/11/02/disable-serial-port-terminal-output-on-raspbian/


3

The RP does not have a strong Floating points support It has single precision hardware acceleration, if you use a distro compiled for it, which there are more than a few now. Looking at this, I don't see any reason why the pi should not handle openBTS ("...basically, any computer should do the work. The only thing which is really required is a USB port...")...


3

First of all, of course it is usable with the raspberry pi. This module communicates over the serial connection UART (raspberry pi gpio14/15) and i worked with different modules with raspberry pi and arduino. First you should read the datasheet, containing necessary information for work with: http://www.vis-plus.ee/pdf/SIM900-DS_Hardware_Design_V1.00.pdf ...


3

If you're trying to make a call using ATD, ATA or ATS0 commands, bear in mind that these commands instruct the modem to make a call using its own audio inputs/outputs. They will work as expected if your modem is a mobile phone (and you will be able to speak to / hear the other side using the phone), but they will do nothing on a device which provides only ...


3

There are answers and comments addressing the question of why this probably isn't working and why it may not be workable as you're doing it now. Regarding the part of your question about how to work around it, I think the most straightforward ways would be either: Use a proxy with a VPN connection in between Send your data from the device connected via GSM ...


3

This seems to be a rather basic issue: your system is configured to provide a login shell (and possibly kernel boot messages) over the UART. You need to disable it in order to use the serial for your own purposes. This can be done using sudo raspi-config (go to Advanced Functions - Serial and select "No" to disable the shell over the serial port), then ...


2

This video explains the process quite well. However, it uses email to send a SMS message instead of tethering to a phone: Make sure you can use the mail command (sudo apt-get install mailutils) and setup your Raspberry Pi to send emails from the command line. You need to look up the SMS gateway for the phone you want to send an SMS to. An example of a ...


2

i made a simple bash script for reset particular USB device. #!/bin/bash #type lsusb to find "vendor" and "product" ID in terminal set -euo pipefail IFS=$'\n\t' #edit the below tow lines of vendor and product values using lsusb result dev=$(lsusb -t | grep usbdevicename | grep 'If 1' | cut -d' ' -f13|cut -d"," -f1) #VENDOR=...


2

You can use pyusb to reset a device: First install pyusb: sudo pip install pyusb Then create this script and run it: #!/usr/bin/python from usb.core import find as finddev dev = finddev(idVendor=0x1234, idProduct=0x5678) dev.reset() Adapt the idVendor and idProduct to the device you want to reset (you can find the id via lsusb)


2

You can buy a GPRS/GSM module for the Pi called the SIM900, from this website. It is also compatible with Arduino and Intel Galileo. The same website also includes very detailed instructions to get the module working with the Pi, it also includes all of the code to get the module working. The software required to get the code working is called minicom. If ...


2

If a system has more than one active network interface, it is expected to get an IP for each one. Now, which one is used when you do a network operation, depends on you routing configuration. Take a look at this question for more info about several interfaces in general (it's not a specific rpi subject but a general one).


2

It is my belief that modules like the SIM900a are intended to enable a device (Pi in this case) to connect to a remote machine, pull or push some data over mobile networks (2G/3G etc). To do that the module will use the SIM card inserted to connect to a mobile network get a dynamic IP address assigned (leased is the term if I am not mistaken) for the ...


2

The port /dev/ttyAMA0 on the raspberry pi 3 maps to the bluetooth and to the standard serial port on the others Assuming you have used the default raspbian image, you will first need to disable the serial console as detailed here The Broadcom UART appears as /dev/ttyAMA0 under Linux. There are several minor things in the way if you want to have ...


2

I have several of these SIM9000A modules. The problem with the slow ping is a bit strange? It should be less than 1 second, even more like 100ms. The other problem is this module only supports GPRS (115kbs) if your GSM supports dual band GPRS (or 2.5G). Most networks do not support this any more (or are deliberately switched off because it affects voice) ...


2

This part: SIM800l RPi GPIO 5VIN 2 GND 39 suggests that you're powering your GSM modem via your RPi. Don't do that! SIM800 can consume up to 2A during transmission, and your RPi doesn't have extra 2A lying around. Even if your power supply can provide 4.5A, your USB cable, micro USB plug and the over current protection circuit or the RPi are not ...


2

After reading the datasheets a little more thoroughly the module I am using requires 5v in but the logic levels are only 3.3v which I guess makes sense. After hooking TX directly up to the PI it worked fine. I'm not sure why the voltage divider was making it fail. If anybody can help me understand why that would be great but at the moment it seems to be ...


2

When you write "\n" in a C program, the compiler replaces it with a single character. The \ is called an 'escape', and it gives a special meaning to the character following it -- in this case the n. Commands sent to the devices must be terminated with a suitable line ending, so it knows where the command ends. Common line endings are \n (which is a single ...


2

You have everything correct, you are just missing the modes. Think of it like different shells, each with their own AT commands. PDU and text mode is where you will probably spend most of your time. This code will start up the serial connection and send the initial AT commands to verify the sim is alive and can see a tower. Then it waits for a prompt to ...


2

Please refer to the section on the elinux page here for the list of 3G/4G adapters which other people have tested with the Pi. I think most of the 3G/4G SIM cards would work with the adapters mentioned there, you can check with your carrier and make sure that the adapter you choose does support those frequency bands.


2

With most providers you will get a private IP address, usually one like 10.x.y.z. This is not reachable from the internet. That is not necessarily to stop people from doing what you want to do, but to conserve public IP addresses. If your providers assigns IPv6 addresses, you may be able to use them. Otherwise, you can use a VPN connection to some VPN ...


1

If you periodically get back the info you stated, then maybe you have issues with power supply. Check if it is about 3,7 volt. If is it too low your sim module may restart sometimes. And also check if your power source can provide up to 2 A current.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible