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You wrote: I want to use one partition for booting (RASPIOS) and one for the data files. The Raspberry Pi OS uses two partitions by default: one for booting, formatted as fat32, and one as root filesystem, formatted as ext4, containing all modules and programs to run the operating system. With a default Raspberry Pi OS the second partition is expanded to ...


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Your circuit is missing a ground connection from the Pi. You need a common reference so that the circuit can tell the difference between GPIO high and GPIO low. Connect a Pi ground pin to the circuit ground (e.g. the -ve of the battery).


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That looks like one of the inductors - if you get yourself a schematic there are two - L1 and L2 that are 4.7uH, both used to provide the internal voltage rails, 3.3V and 1.8V from the 5V supply so unless you are able to refit a new one I afraid that it is probably broken.


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You should probably go for an Arduino if performance is really important to you. There are many ways you can get a Raspberry Pi to communicate with an Arduino if you need a Pi to be in your project. If you have decided on using a Raspberry Pi only, you can use WiringPi if you want to control the GPIO pins with C/C++. You can read the documentation for it ...


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The question has a solution. in the comments it is noted, that the HDMI cable was broken. Replacing it with a new one solved the problem.


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Yes, you can partition an SSD. If you're using Windows you can use this guide to partition your SSD: https://www.wikihow.com/Partition-a-Drive-on-Windows You can then use a tool like Etcher to flash the .iso to the partition you created for your OS. You can use the other partition for normal storage.


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It turns out that a lot of the cheaper magnetometers just aren't accurate enough and there isn't that much you can do about that. I've tried Sense HAT, MPU9250, 6050, QMC, all sharing the same issues, but to a different extent. When I turned my eye to more specified robotics devices, I've discovered UK-based company "Robot Electronics", which sells ...


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A magnetometer, otherwise known as a digital compass, is first and foremost a sensor that measures the Earth’s magnetic field in three dimensions. They are also known to be noisy, esp. if they’re anywhere near another magnet typically a monitor, power supply, or similar electronics. Try moving your sensor around and you may see it move because of such. If so ...


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If you want to physically disable Wifi/BT, the easiest way is to disconnect the antenna, or short the antenna output to ground via a 1nF capacitor. Removing the WiFi/BT module is trivial with the right equipment (heat up the board and lift the shield and the IC up with a vacuum pen), but without a schematic I would not give you any guarantees that the rest ...


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I'd add a comment but I don't have enough rep yet - We need to see the schematic of the remote you're trying to connect it to before we can answer. Edit: Scratch that I think I see the issue: Your circuit does not match your circuit diagram. You've got pins 1 and 3 mixed up on your transistor. You also do not seem to have connected the Pi and remote to a ...


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What you need to do is wire the transistor correctly! Connect the load in the collector circuit as suggested https://elinux.org/RPi_GPIO_Interface_Circuits What you have will put ~2.7V across the load - the remaining voltage will be across the transistor and be dissipated as heat! NOTE the S9013 is an NPN transistor - your schematic shows PNP.


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