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11

TL;DR use hw_mode=a I see that the man pages for hostapd are quite useless I found a more useful page https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Hostapd with the following example 802.11a/n/ac with WPA2-PSK and CCMP A simple but secure AP for recent hardware: FILE /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf interface=wlan0 # the interface used by the AP hw_mode=a # a ...


9

Just from the installation with sudo apt install hostapd there is nothing configured for the service. hostapd has no default setup so it doesn't make sense to start the service without it. To avoid possible confusion I suppose the package manager has decided to mask the service on installation. Just disable it is not enough to be on the save side because a ...


4

You have to do three steps: create a virtual interface ap0 for the access point start access point daemon hostapd using interface ap0 start wpa_supplicant for wifi client using interface wlan0 You have to do it exactly in this order otherwise the setup will fail. I have seen many attempts to achieve this including restarting services in order with special ...


4

There are many quirks with creating the virtual interface ap0. You have to follow exactly a sequence, otherwise it won't work. If other applications bind to the wifi port it cannot be set. create a virtual interface ap0 for the access point start access point daemon hostapd using interface ap0 start wpa_supplicant for wifi client using interface wlan0 Many ...


4

If you are open to use another modern all-in-one networking environment without needing additional helpers like hostapd, dnsmasq or bridge utils you can use systemd-networkd. It makes life easier. It is part of the default Raspbian image and you only have to enable and configure it. Here is a tested and working setup for what you want to do: Configuring ...


4

What you have purchased isn't only an antenna to replace the built-in antenna (I don't believe that's possible), it is a complete new WiFi transmitter/receiver that can be used in addition to the built-in WiFi. If you do not need the built-in WiFi so just don't configure/use it. You can also completely disable it by adding this option to /boot/config.txt: ...


4

With the built-in wifi-device of a Raspberry Pi it is possible to create an access point together with an uplink client connection. This can be done with creating a virtual interface ap0 (or what name do you like) from the physical interface wlan0. Because the virtual interface ap0 depends on wlan0 it is a bit sophisticated to manage its initialization in ...


4

You are asking for a general tutorial in name resolution which has nothing to do with Raspberry Pi. It is a general networking issue and I can only give an overview where you can look for more details. At the beginning of the internet there was a simple file /etc/hosts used that contained all ip address to name mappings on every device. It is obviously that ...


3

The Tutorial you used is not up to date as it was written in 2013 and seems to be written for normal Ubuntu not Ubuntu Core. I never used Ubuntu Core but they seem to use systemd-networkd: By default network management on Ubuntu Core is handled by systemd's networkd and netplan. While NetworkManager has some support to handle netplan configuration ...


3

The solution passed to remove the service file in /etc/systemd/system/hostapd.service. Using cat in this file, because nano wasn't able to open it, I saw that the file was corrupted, so I delete the file and now, I am able to start/stop the service, and everything related. Thank you to the ones that have tried to help me!


3

Check out this test of RPi performance w.r.t various network interfaces. Built-in WiFi on an RPi 3 is capped at 36 Mbps, and a USB dongle is capped at about 80Mbps in ideal conditions. At 10 meters distance, those numbers drop to 32 and 64 Mbps respectively. After you factor in overhead from two interfaces running simultaneously, routing performance losses, ...


3

It seems that that one of hundred tutorials you used is somewhat outdated. You should use the tutorial given on the official Raspberry Pi site: Setting up a Raspberry Pi as a routed wireless access point, as already suggested by @Andyroo in his answer. If you have problems with hostapd or need a some more sophisticated setup, you may have a look at Setting ...


2

You also asked: "Maybe you got even hints for a better solution in general." I prefer to use systemd-networkd because it has all in one. Using two USB/wifi dongle simplifies it a lot. So my hint is to look at Access point as WiFi repeater with additional WiFi-dongle. It does not fit exactly your needs but it should not be a big problem to adapt it to your ...


2

I was redirected here from the excellent thread of Ingo because I'm trying to make my RPi3 to act as WiFi extender. Like you, I followed every steps and I noticed that a device connected to the extended WiFi network couldn't get any DNS address from the primary Wireless router. Something draws my attention on Troubleshooting section. @Ingo explains that ...


2

Compared to the official guidelines you are missing a) an entry to the file /etc/default/hostapd: DAEMON_CONF="/etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf" b) an entry to the file dhcpcd.conf nohook wpa_supplicant


2

I've resolved by myself, I have made a script in bash that restart the hostapd service with #!/bin/bash service hostapd restart and make it executable with sudo chmod +x /location/file then used sudo visudo and make the file executable without asking for password, adding in the file [your_username] ALL= NOPASSWD: /location/of/file went in ...


2

Try starting with channel=48 and without using acs_survey. Once you get something working you can experiment from there.


2

You have configured a bridge with slave interfaces eth0 and wlan0. Everything looks good. You only have one (virtual) interface br0 with an ip address 192.168.1.90. Don't be confused by eth0 and wlan0. As slaves of the bridge they have lost their normal IP characteristics and only work on the OSI data link layer with MAC addresses. The normal interface of ...


2

A client that knows the SSID will connect even if the SSID is hidden. So there is no need to hide it after the client connects, just run with it hidden all the time. You can manually add a new client just by entering the SSID into the wpa_supplicant.conf file along with the password. You should also be able to do it with what ever GUI tools are available, ...


2

Developer of RaspAP here. The project does not lock the file system or interfere with other services. I installed mosquitto after RaspAP, enabled the service and rebooted. Confirmed it's active and listening on port 1883: sudo netstat -ltnp | grep -w ':1883' tcp6 0 0 :::1883 LISTEN 405/mosquitto Check the output of mount -l and ...


2

Remove packages: apt-get -y remove hostapd dnsmasq bridge-utils Comment the line below from /etc/sysctl.conf: #net.ipv4.ip_forward=1 Reset iptables: iptables -F Delete following lines from /etc/dhcpcd.conf: interface wlan0 static ip_address=192.168.4.1/24 nohook wpa_supplicant Restart the dhcpcd daemon: sudo service dhcpcd restart ...


2

It is hard to get an idea what's wrong, with the information we get only step by step reading between the lines. You are using a HomeAssistent we still not know what it is. You have a wired uplink to your internet router but no bridge on the RasPi. There is also an access point running. It seems you are using NetworkManager. This all is far away from a ...


2

From the debug output of wpa_supplicant I see there is the old background driver wext used and that there are many "unsupported" messages. wext isn't used normally, you should use default background driver nl80211. That's what is best supported by Buster. Debug again but only with option -Dnl80211, not with fallback option -Dnl80211,wext, and show if it ...


2

Thanks to @Ingo suggesting a fresh installation of Buster, I was eventually able to track down the problem, which was due to an update in the package firmware-brcm80211. The current release of Buster (2020-02-13-raspbian-buster-lite) comes with firmware-brcm80211 1:20190114-1+rpt4 and upgrading to firmware-brcm80211 1:20190114-1+rpt5 causes a failure to ...


2

It is unclear what you really want: I just need the ability to connect to the Pi through AP mode and the Pi should be able to contact a website for data But you are talking about wlan1 that is usually provided by an additional USB/WiFi dongle. You do not need it for what you have written. With a Raspberry Pi 3B+ you can just use the built-in WiFi with ...


2

I do not follow exactly all steps you have done because there are sophisticated dependencies between the services and interfaces. But here are some general thoughts that can explain your problems. The ap0 interface is not an independent interface. It is only a virtual interface name of wlan0 and therefore it extremely depends on the status of wlan0. The all ...


2

Using NOOBS is not a good idea. We have seen many problems here using it. If you only want to have an access point running on the RasPi then just download Raspberry Pi OS (32-bit) Lite, flash it to an SD-Card and boot it in your RasPi. Then you can follow to Setting up a Raspberry Pi as an access point - the easy way.


2

I prefer to use systemd-networkd so I can only help with Setting up a Raspberry Pi as an access point - the easy way and I haven't used EAP authentication so far in my home network. Have a look at the examples at the end of /usr/share/doc/wpa_supplicant/examples/wpa_supplicant.conf. Purging rfkill is not the right solution. rfkill unblock wlan will ...


2

I have seen similar behavior because of weak firmware. Not sure if it also helps in your case but it might be worth a try. You can downgrade the firmware to a more stable version. Have a look at Access point as WiFi router/repeater, optional with bridge. At the beginning there is a part, labeled IMPORTANT UPDATE on 2020-09-02, that described how to downgrade ...


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