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9

I reformulate: You want an USB Hub that will be self-powered. You want it to backfeed (power) your RPi by connecting the Hub and RPi through the mini-USB connector You want to plug an HDD to your RPi through this USB Hub You should first read this about backfeeding. I cannot recommend you to backfeed your RPi with your hub, it may not be safe and may lead ...


7

The maximum is 127 devices - including the hubs themselves. Some hubs will actually have two USB hubs internally, so you would need to take that into account also. Though I can't imagine you hooking up so many devices for that to be an issue.


5

The Pi zero has only one USB port. It has two microUSB sockets. The socket closer to the edge of the long side of the board is the power socket. The socket closer to the middle of the long side of the board is a USB port. You seem to be able to back power via the USB port. You will have to judge the reliability of back powering the Pi zero by personal ...


3

Assuming the micro-USB socket "power" of the Pi Zero is used to power the Pi, I take it that the question refers to the USB ports or sockets of the used hub as a source. Further assuming that we're talking about a self-powered hub here, as a bus-powered hub cannot supply more than 500 mA in total to its downstream ports. So according to USB spec a USB port ...


3

The conculsion of the test described on http://www.yoctopuce.com/EN/article/how-many-usb-devices-can-you-connect is that Raspberry Pi 2 appears to work with 10 devices sending messages at 100 Hz and it is impossible to get 17 devices to work simultaneously, even when they send almost no data.


3

Raspberry Pi boards manufactured in the third quartile of 2012 do not have issues with backfeeding anymore (due to removed fuse), see http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/1929 and http://elinux.org/RPi_HardwareHistory#Board_Revision_History. As previously mentioned you can check http://elinux.org/RPi_VerifiedPeripherals#Powered_USB_Hubs for HUBs, but you ...


3

I got a 2.1A power supply for the USB hub and now it detects it correctly. I guess the drive draws more than 1A of power.


2

The problem was the USB cable.


2

Yes, you definitely can. A lot of people are doing this. Just note that some hubs don't work properly. E.g. because the power adapter doesn't provide steady enough voltage for the Pi to work properly. Also because some hub have power-feedback. To prevent this, first check the list of hubs, known to work with the pi.


2

I would recommend just getting a multi-way adapter. It makes one socket into 2 or more. The adapter would be able to power the Pi and the hub as long as your hub doesn't use more then 1400 mA.


2

What about using the RPi Camera Module? I am not sure how much power that consumes compared to your usb camera. If you do wanna check out the RPi Camera Module, then you can have a look at the documentation here to see if its something that fits your needs. If you still are considering USB hubs, then you can see a list here with RPi-working usb hubs with ...


2

You should make sure that the USB hub is: (a) a powered hub, (b) for USB 2.0, and (c) preferably verified on this wiki page with a list of verified powered USB hubs for the Raspberry Pi. I also did a bit of googling and found PiHub, which is one that has been specially designed to be compatible with the Pi.


2

A powered hub uses the power provided by a Wall wart to power USB devices instead of the computers power. In the case of the Raspberry Pi, a powered hub is necessary to power many devices such as hard drives, CD drives, etc. because powering all these devices would leave the Raspberry Pi under powered, leading to shorter component life and even a non ...


2

Your PSU isn't powerful enough. Try the official Raspberry Pi PSU. Also try plugging in a power adaptor to your USB hub if it has a jack.


1

If you need more LAN interfaces, the best solution in terms of performance per dollar is to get several USB to LAN adapters. For low speeds (below 10Mbps), an SPI to LAN module can be used. Such a module can indeed be wired to GPIO SPI pins. You will want to check if a Linux driver is available before buying a module, since many of those are made for ...


1

"We checked the voltage and Amps(sic) with a USB meter and we have: 5.01V 0.825A" - presumably this is of the USB HDD which would mean the average current drawn is 825mA i.e. the peak current would be much higher. The Pi (at least the Pi3) can supply 1.2A (total) from USB. This is not managed on an individual port basis. Theoretically this should work with ...


1

If you mean a powered USB hub, generally yes, they should work with no problems. The drives will appear as they normally do. If you are worried, buy from somewhere that will take a return or exchange within a few days without a hassle -- but again, the chance of it not working is very slim.


1

Lightning bolt means undervoltage. Measure the voltage you're getting out of your hub (with a multimeter, USB charge monitor, whatever) and on the power pins of your RPi. Either your hub is not supplying a high enough voltage, or your cable is bad enough to drop the voltage on the RPi side. Also, a "3A" label doesn't magically turn a bad power supply into ...


1

But here is the weird thing i want to make sure is safe and isnt hurting my RPI. Generally it isn't safe to power from multiple sources, but in this case there is really only one 5V DC supply, the hub. Ideally the microUSB power jack should be used since it provides the best protection against over-current/over-voltage; the circuit there includes a ...


1

You could try something akin to what worked here with regard to an OTG hub on a Pi Zero. However, the situation is a little different on the other models, where the onboard hub has two entries in /sys (possibly due to the ethernet controller which is part of the USB controller, but more likely due to the way the hub is configured for use as a USB master -- ...


1

Apparently one of the pads is notoriously prone to shorting as it is very close to the bottom side of the through hole of the micro USB OTG port. This was what was happening.


1

There is only 1 usb root hub on the pi. There is little difference if you put everything on the hub or if you use 2 hubs or whatever, except for power usage: some wifi dongle can operate directly, some require a powered hub. The Pi ports can only provide 350mA IIRC, which is about half the USB standard maximum. I can't tell you for the mice, but the wifi ...


1

I haven't used it personally, but I would be slightly way of its use. I have used other unpowered hubs with the RPi before, and it was my experience that the combination of powering the hub itself and the things connected to it often caused power issues. I would highly recommend sticking to a powered hub, especially when you have something power hungry ...


1

You may probably skip connecting +5V, but you most definitely need to connect ground to achieve any communication.


1

Most probably it's a power supply issue to the soud card. Keep in mind that for USB 2.0 the standard is 500mA (half Ampere). The problem can come from two situations: The power supply to your USB hub may not be providing enough current to the hub The hub USB ports may not be able to provide enough current even if the hub power supply is more than capable ...


1

I'm no expert but I got my modem to connect after having this same issue. I used information from this forum SparqEE. I installed minicom on my pi: sudo apt-get install minicom I then used minicom to connect to the modem: minicom -D /dev/ttyUSB0 where ttyUSB0 was seen in the debug logs of sakis in minicom "terminal" I typed the following command to "...


1

Yes. Install Minidlna to stream media from the Raspberry Pi. Use a Wifi dongle to create a hotspot Then all you need is power to be able to stream media from the Pi via the hotspot to a device which connects via wifi. MiniDLNA is a DLNA server designed to stream media from a central repository to DLNA clients. This means that any device that can run a ...


1

I've seen someone disable the LAN chip on the board. Running only 200mA on idle. Otherwise you'd just have to try out a few hubs, and see which one uses the least amount of current. Or buy a raspberry camera board, leaving you with only one USB device.


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