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5

A desktop devoid of all images and icons sounds very much like a known issue with running on 64-bit hosts. qemu needs to be 32-bits for correct emulation and a proper build. The fixes that worked for me is to run pi-gen directly on the Raspberry Pi 4 (it's a bit slow) or on Ubuntu 16.04 which is 32-bit. Here is more info: https://github.com/RPi-Distro/pi-gen/...


3

To give more insight into the issue, it appears to be a bug in 64-bit qemu emulating a 32-bit machine, which won't use the host's 32-bit libraries in a readdir() call, so the host kernel feed it with 64-bit offsets, which qemu passes to the emulated 32-bit system, which then reports an overflow. This leads to random missing files in the build. One workaround ...


3

I would be surprised if modifying a couple of text files confused the compression algorithm to the point it produced an extra 300MB of output. So I would start by comparing the sizes of uncompressed images: if the two images are not the same size, it's no surprise they compress differently, even if the amount of data on filesystem level is the same. Images ...


2

I would recommend several steps: Eliminate (delete) any extraneous fluff (files, packages, etc...) "sudo apt-get clean" to get rid of the .deb archives. Zero out your filespace. e.g. "cp /dev/zero /zerofile ; rm zerofile" This will rid you of all the left-over bits in the filesystem, leading to a much better compression. Archive the SD ...


2

Just use the official supported Raspberry Pi OS. On a running system of it you will find: rpi ~$ ls -lh /boot/kernel* -rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 5.6M Dec 9 21:15 /boot/kernel7.img -rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 5.9M Dec 9 21:15 /boot/kernel7l.img -rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 16M Dec 9 21:15 /boot/kernel8.img -rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 5.3M Dec 9 21:15 /boot/kernel.img These ...


2

I had the same problem. In addition, I found out that removing the old partitions on the SD card using fdisk did not do anything either, which is a quicker test than trying dd again. I was able to create a file using touch this_is_partX in the root of each mounted partition on the SD card, which is useful to check 1) if the SD card is still functional and ...


1

The SD card gets an image with initial partitions. Once the Pi boots, it uses the SD card just as any other disk: it reads and writes to it. So, an SD card can handle that it is written to multiple times. Writing to the SD card is exactly what you do when you put the initial image on it. So, just multiple times writing to it should not be a problem. That ...


1

dd may take quite a while, especially if there's a problem with an sd-card. For these long actions, I generally add status=progress to the dd command line. cp ans dd do very different things. With dd you copy all the "sectors" of the partition, even those that are empty. With cp, you only copy the files. Unless your original and new image are ...


1

I found the solution and it may help someone so I am going to post it. I used Qt resources https://doc.qt.io/qt-5/resources.html and it will help you to integrate the images to the executable. so under my test_v1 directory I created a file image.qrc (I used nano to create it) after that in qtcreator I added to my project this file (right click on the project ...


1

I found the answer. I was connecting the USB cord to the host PC through a USB hub. When I connected directly to the host without the hub, everything worked correctly. I'm not sure why the hub causes a failure since everything else that's connected to it works fine. But I'm thankfully able to continue working now.


1

Raspbian/Raspberry Pi OS repositories have the Gnome disk utility package that installs Image Mounter and adds "Mount Image" to the right-click context menu. Viz.: sudo apt-get install gnome-disk-utility This allows you to mount and use the contents of a disk image with multiple partitions. I do not know if it mounts R/O or R/W.


1

Debian image partitions are aligned to a 1MB boundary, while the Pi OS image partitions are aligned to 4MB boundary. The alignment is done to insure that partitions include a whole number of physical blocks which have different sizes on different media. Having a fraction of physical block inside a partition could lead to very rare problems, such as data ...


1

Question: But... How - if possible - can I create an image file using /mnt/backups/{root and boot} that I can flash to a new SD card and use this SD card to boot the Pi There may be good reasons for the stuff you've done; but TL;DR My suggestion is this: use image-utils. You can read about it & d/l in this long-ish thread, or use git to clone the repo ...


1

"How would 8GB inherently know what 4GB's IP address was?" Most DHCP clients cache leases and only request a new lease when the lease time expires. If you have cloned a SD Card you will have cloned all the cached data. If you had used the normal Predictable Network Interface Names this would not be an issue. DHCP clients have a command to release ...


1

There are many ways of making an installable image. I use the following script to backup my Pi and this creates images which can be installed on another Pi. The size of the image created can be set to be as small as possible, although for backup purposes I make this larger. This does not automatically resize, although it is possible to include this. The ...


1

You want to clone the master SD Card and then modify the cloned image before distributing it. I assume you use a raw image file as for example created with dd. Because the image file contains the raw partitions and filesystems of the original SD Card you cannot just edit it.You have to mount the partitions in the image file. Then you are able to modify it. ...


1

You can do this using image-util. image-util may also give you a smaller .img file, and run more quickly. Additionally, if you need to make changes to the original .img file, you may do so without creating a new image - you may simply "update" the existing image. Download image-util read the documentation in the forum As an alternative to the ...


1

How can I host images for my website on my Raspberry Pi? As per comments, this is what a web server is for. What's available is mostly dictated by the operating system; presuming you are using Raspbian/RpiOS, that is essentially "linux" and anything from this list with turquoise in the "Software license" column should work. The most ...


1

Take a look at Flask (https://flask.palletsprojects.com/en/1.1.x/) as that can be used to host webpages from the Pi. But I do worry about the security of opening up a Pi to the whole world. Once you've opened a port on your router to permit access to the Pi's web pages then all the hackers will also try and get in.


1

I have never used a Linux system before and have never even taken a computer class so bear with me. I got this to work so you should be able to as well. I grabbed a couple of the Pi 4's, the 4GB and 8GB models and downloaded Kali Linux on my laptop. Here is what I did to get it to work. On the Linux system: sudo apt if not in root (enter root by sudo su or ...


1

I changed import Image to from PIL import Image and tis worked well for me. My context is to make a specific texture for vpython. My system is mac Mojave(10.14) python --version is Python 2.7.9


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