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61

This is the main project my Raspberry Pi is dedicated to right now, so I figure I can add my two cents. Keep in mind this project is still very much a work in progress. I chose to use the C programming language for this project exclusively on the Raspbian OS, and that may have affected some of my decisions and instructions. I'm going to only list free and ...


39

You need to reconfigure you keyboard mappings. At the command line type: sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration Follow the prompts. Then restart your RasPi. sudo reboot Or sudo nano /etc/default/keyboard find the line where it says XKBLAYOUT=”gb” and change the gb to the two letter code for your country (e.g. US). And restart your RasPi. If ...


28

Turns out that the OP was thinking along the correct path with his trying $ sudo nano /etc/modprobe.d/alsa-base.conf and changing the index from -2 to 0 via adding options snd-usb-audio index=0 to the file. However, this wasn't working. The correct way to do it is to add options snd-usb-audio index=0 followed by options snd_bcm2835 index=1. Essentially ...


18

I think you have to decide what matters most to you in the monitor. Do you want: The highest resolution possible? Easy portability? A mountable screen? An articulated monitor arm? Battery/DC/AC power? HDMI/Composite input? Touchscreen functionality? On-board speakers/sound? An inexpensive solution? A warranty? The answers to these questions will help you ...


15

The issue is going to be drivers. As most products sold do not have open source drivers, it is up to someone with the know how to reverse engineer them. Because of this, if the device is not extremely popular, it is likely not going to be supported. I have not used one of these personally but sites do exist with hardware databases. The accuracy of the ...


14

With Raspbian Jesse, to change the default audio device is simpler than it used to be. Now, simply use this command to list your alsa-detected sound cards, and take note of the card number of your preferred device. aplay -l Then create/edit the alsa configuration file at ~/.asoundrc, or the system wide one at /etc/asound.conf, and paste these lines: pcm.!...


12

This is caused by inadequate power. Use a good power supply and a good power cable. Some cheap cables that work with a cell phone, cannot fully power the R-Pi. Some USB devices require a lot of power: most will have a label showing the voltage and mA requirements. They should be 5v 100mA each max, any more than this they must be used with a powered ...


11

You can use a great tool called x2x. This essentially treats the monitor connected to the remote device (the Raspberry Pi) as a second X screen to you existing session as if you had two monitors connected. Install x2x on both devices: sudo pacman -S x2x # Arch Linux sudo apt-get install x2x # Debian/Raspbian Configure SSH: On the Raspberry Pi ...


11

The product announcement does not list any form of audio in. You could use a USB device as mentioned by Phil, or use a hat that's designed for the job.


10

synergy can do this quite well Synergy lets you easily share your mouse and keyboard between multiple computers on your desk, and it's Free and Open Source. Just move your mouse off the edge of one computer's screen on to another. You can even share all of your clipboards. All you need is a network connection. Synergy is cross-platform (works on ...


10

I know this isn't exactly what you're looking for, but you might find this interesting. You can purchase a lapdock, made for a cell phone, that will provide you a portable keyboard and monitor for use with your RPI. Simply connect an HDMI to HDMI micro female adapter to the lapdock. They are often on sale for ~$60. Likely far cheaper than any other monitor ...


8

You can use two or three resistors to form a voltage divider Input----[ 1k ]-----[ 2k ]---GND | | | GPIO PIN If your wires aren't too long, you can use higher resistors - say 10k & 20k If you can't find 2k resistor, you can connect 2 1k resistors in series Input----[ 1k ]-----[ 1k ]----...


6

I ran into this same issue and the second step of AndyD's reply to this question on the raspberrypi.org forum suggests an alternative to restarting. Use the command: $ sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration to reconfigure your keyboard. Choose English (US) for keyboard layout (second page of configuration). Then either reboot or $ invoke-...


6

That is correct, there is no audio input. The Pis generate analogue audio output using simple pulse width modulation (PWM) which is an efficient way to make output audio, but in the case of the Pi, it lacks great analogue separation. To get audio input, the Pi would have to have a dedicated audio codec, which it doesn't. A lot of people mention USB sound ...


5

Lilliput sell some HDMI touchscreens and there is some evidence that it works with the RPi.


5

I went with pocketsphinx_continuous and a $4 sound card. To manage the fact that it needs to stop listening when using speech synth I used amixer to handle to input volume to the mic (this was recommended best practice by CMU as stop-starting engine will result in poorer recognition) echo "SETTING MIC IN TO 15 (94%)" >> ./audio.log amixer -c 1 set ...


4

A quick google eventually led me here and after a quick test this worked for me. In short you need to setup xrdp sudo apt-get install xrdp Once install it will set the rdp service to start on boot, so restart your RPi. When your RPi has finished booting you will be able to connect to your RPi through Windows built-in (or any other third party) remote ...


4

The short answer is, no you can't do this with a Raspberry Pi. The long answer is, perhaps with enough external hardware and a great deal of knowledge of how HDMI works you might be able to do something like you describe. If you want to see and example of a hackable ARM device running linux that can do HDMI manipulation and pass through you can look at the ...


4

you need only 1 (one) ground pin for does not matter how many input buttons. there's absolutely no reason to use any other pin as a ground as long as you have one already used.


4

If you are referring to the Raspberry Pi and wouldn't mind writing a few lines of code involving GPIO, the capacitive touch hat from Adafruit would suit you nicely. I'm not sure about the second paragraph though. Maybe you're looking for Transparent Conductive Film (Google it).


4

I set up my ~/.asoundrc like below and it allowed playback from the USB sound card and input from the separate USB mic. pcm.!default { type hw card 0 #card 0 is USB sound card } ctl.!default { type hw card 2 #card 2 is USB microphone }


4

While the suggested schematics may (or may not) work it is indeed a lot of effort to save the ground wire (just as joan's answers points out). Don't think of GND as a third pin. It's not a GPIO pin, it's the common ground. It also does not "use up", i.e. you can use it multiple times over. Which is part of your linked picture at raspberrypi.org. Both ...


4

There are no formal published data, but the following summarises what I have been able to discover. Electrical Specifications of GPIO I would NOT apply 3.6V to a GPIO pin, but if the voltage does not exceed Vcc + diode voltage (~0.7V) damage is unlikely. I would use a serial resistor in any event. If you know the voltage may be excessive use a resistive ...


3

you should use lsusb command to find the device manufacturer and product code like this: $ lsusb Bus 008 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub Bus 007 Device 002: ID 045e:0047 Microsoft Corp. IntelliMouse Explorer 3.0 Bus 007 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub Bus 006 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root ...


3

If you there going for THE cheapest display, I think this would be it.


3

SiriProxy - Only use this if you have a device that uses Siri - you don't need to jailbreak anything. It basically intercepts Siri on the network you install it on. Speech2Text - You can use Googles API to decode speech to text but the example contains some other methods too. Julius - A speech recognition decoder. As pointed out by Lenik, you will need ...


3

Yes. use PocketSphinx for speech recognition, Festvox for text to speech (TTS) and some USB audio with line in (or an old supported webcam which also has line in). Google searches for these software packages and "Raspberry Pi" provide many examples and tutorials to set this up.


3

I found the answer to this problem in the following topic: https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/231139/libinput-touchpad-is-dead-around-the-perimter Summary: Create a new file /etc/modprobe.d/hid_logitech_hidpp.conf and add options hid_logitech_hidpp disable_raw_mode=1 to it. Power off the host, remove the "unifying receiver" (the little USB dongle) ...


2

USB would be the instant choice. Converting an Arduino touchscreen to use the GPIO port would be a simple project. Or wait for the DSI drivers/information to be released. Current Development is being put into the DSI camera port, not the display+touchscreen. If I was not so poor then like above, a HDMI 1.4 screen with touch interface.


2

Probably you should read something about microcontrollers communication methods. There are some standard mechanisms that are supported by almost any microcontroler (including RPi) and you are mentioning that you want to use some microcontroler on your board too. Those mechanisms are UART, SPI or I2C. It will be quire simple to establish communication using ...


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