124

This no longer works since ssh is not enabled. Using only the laptop's screen and keyboard (both before and after installation), install and configuration for headless operation using SSH is possible using NOOBS (they call it "silent install"). It does not require a separate screen or keyboard/mouse. It does require an SD card reader on the laptop (built in ...


60

Take a look at the Raspberry Pi wiki on re-mapping the keyboard with Debian Squeeze: Re-mapping the keyboard with Debian Squeeze If different letters appear on-screen from that which you typed, you need to reconfigure you keyboard settings. In Debian, from a command line type: sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration Follow the prompts....


59

First thing to do: Open terminal Second you will need to update the repositories: sudo apt-get update An upgrade to the whole system isn't needed but it is recommended: sudo apt-get upgrade Now we can install the virtual keyboard: sudo apt-get install matchbox-keyboard Rebooting is recommended: sudo reboot Now you can access the keyboard: Menu >>...


25

On Raspbian, edit the file /etc/default/keyboard and then run sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration. You may have to restart your terminal and/or the Pi for everything to take effect. The particulars of what you need to enter depend on what you want to do. For me, this: XKBMODEL="pc105" XKBLAYOUT="us" XKBVARIANT="altgr-intl" XKBOPTIONS="terminate:...


24

There is a quick graphical way to change the keyboard layouts, the toggle key-combination and have a panel indicator at the same time. Right click on the panel and choose Add/Remove Panel Items Click Add Click 'Keyboard Layout Handler` Click Close Right click on the flag that appears on the panel Choose 'Keyboard Layout Handler Settings' Uncheck Keep system ...


23

Steve's answer, though correct at the time, is now somewhat out of date. In Raspbian: sudo raspi-config and go to the configure_keyboard section with 4 Internationalisation Options -> I3 Change Keyboard Layout You can choose the correct keyboard type and layout from there.


21

run sudo raspi-config and setup your Locale and Keyboard. These are located under Internationalisation Options


11

There is no easy or simple way to achieve what you ask. The simplest answer is just ignore this keyboard and get a USB one. However, if you really want to do it, it's a DIY job through and through. Your solution will be custom to this keyboard and may or may not be easily adapted to accommodate keyboards from other manufacturers. Laptop keyboard connectors ...


11

Here is one thing to try out: Edit /etc/default/keyboard with your favorite editor (vim, nano,). Remember to use sudo: sudo nano /etc/default/keyboard Make the file look like this: # KEYBOARD CONFIGURATION FILE # Consult the keyboard(5) manual page. XKBMODEL="pc105" XKBLAYOUT="se" XKBVARIANT="" XKBOPTIONS="terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp" BACKSPACE="guess" ...


10

For a headless setup, SSH can be enabled by placing a file named ssh, without any extension, onto the boot partition of the SD card. When the Pi boots, it looks for the ssh file. If it is found, SSH is enabled, and the file is deleted. The content of the file does not matter: it could contain text, or nothing at all.


9

In my case, Raspbian (jessie): $ cat /etc/os-release PRETTY_NAME="Raspbian GNU/Linux 8 (jessie)" ... $ sudo vi ~/.config/lxkeymap.cfg option = ctrl:swapcaps or option = <something>,ctrl:swapcaps then $ sudo reboot ctrl:swapcaps swaps the Ctrl and CapsLock keys. If you'd like to just replace CapsLock and keep the original Ctrl as is, use ctrl:...


9

Is it possible to install and configure a Raspberry Pi without a wired keyboard or mouse? It should be. I've used a wireless keyboard/mouse combo with a USB dongle; that works out of the box with the linux kernel as configured on raspbian (and almost certainly other available systems too). Just don't get anything too wierd that requires special drivers or ...


9

The short answer is, make sure you download the offline install version of NOOBS, then edit the file recovery.cmdline and add silentinstall on the end of the first line. That will auto install raspbian, and reboot into the desktop when finished.


7

I use pad4pi. It simplifies everything. For more details you may want to see githubdemoproject. from pad4pi import rpi_gpio import time # Setup Keypad KEYPAD = [ ["1","2","3","A"], ["4","5","6","B"], ["7","8","9","C"], ["*","0","#","D"] ] # same as calling: factory.create_4_by_4_keypad, still we put here fyi: ROW_PINS = [4,...


7

| = AltGr + Shift + `~ \ = AltGr + -_ One solution that I've found is to hold the AltGr key and press the `~ key. But I'm not sure if this would work for a normal "right alt" on a US keyboard. According to wikipedia, the answer is: it depends how the US keyboard was made. I happen to be using a CanaKit CK-KB-101 which is identical to this one and it has a ...


6

All USB keyboards are 5V. No matter how big or how small, they always use 5V power as supplied by the USB port. However, different devices draw different amounts of current. A typical USB port provides 500mA of current, and the Raspberry Pi (model B) draws between 300mA and 700mA (depending on processor load). Try to keep the current used by USB devices to ...


6

NOTE I found the answer on the official forums. Thank you DancingMan. Steps Open Terminal as a root user Go to other>X-Terminal as root (GKsu) Type in the reconfigure command dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration Follow the prompts Hopefully that was helpful - this issue had been bugging me for hours!


6

I haven't tested this, but I assume that you can change the keyboard layout in the same way as on a normal Debian install. Raspbian uses LXDE as its desktop environment, so you can follow their instructions: setxkbmap -option grp:switch,grp:alt_shift_toggle,grp_led:scroll us,th See http://wiki.lxde.org/en/Change_keyboard_layouts (and also http://wiki....


6

I'm assuming Raspbian: sudo raspi-config then go to 4 Internationalisation Options, then I3 Change Keyboard Layout. Select a US keyboard layout, and you should be up and running.


6

I'd like to install openelec on my pi2, after I have the pi the way I like it can i unplug my peripherals and have it boot up without kb/mouse Yes.


6

You just need to add a file named 'ssh' to the noobs partition (you can do it right when copying fresh noobs files to a clean sd card) and it will enable ssh for raspbian when you install it from this noobs setup (including for subsequent raspbian reinstalls, i.e. this 'ssh' file on noobs partition will be persistent and have effect for every time you (re)...


5

try for Raspbian GNU/Linux 9.4 (stretch) sudo nano /home/pi/.config/lxpanel/LXDE-pi/panels/panel At the end of the file change to Plugin { type=xkb Config { Model=pc105 LayoutsList=us,ru VariantsList=, ToggleOpt=grp:alt_shift_toggle KeepSysLayouts=0 DisplayType=0 } } Save and reboot system.


5

I found this guide to be the most useful. An important update in setup: ssh is disabled by default on the newest images. You have to create a new file ssh in /boot (can be empty). E.g. touch /Volumes/boot/ssh


5

If you are not in X and already at a virtual console, you do not need to use Ctrl and just Alt+F1 should work. If the keyboard issue is that it cannot handle 3 modifiers, this might help, but if the issue is that the Function key doesn't allow modifiers, then this won't help. To get around this, if your keyboard has arrow keys, Alt+left/right arrow keys ...


5

Can you insert the SD card into another machine and mount the filesystem? If so, edit /etc/default/keyboard and change XKBLAYOUT="in" back to your desired setting. If needed, there's a list of valid codes on Wikipedia.


5

If you know the IP address you can ssh from another machine. Then use the raspi-config utility: Open a terminal Run raspi-config Choose Localisation Options Choose Change Keyboard Layout Choose your keyboard or one of the generics Choose your langauge. For instance, for American English choose English (US) sudo reboot Alternatively to ssh, if you have ...


5

The Raspberry Pi has a header which contains many GPIO (General-Purpose I/O) pins that can be controlled directly from software on the Pi. These pins can be configured as outputs or as inputs (which is what you'd need for your buttons). You'll have to deal with contact bouncing, which means you'll have to learn about debouncing. There's an elaborate article ...


5

I found that pressing \ (backslash) key produces the # character which is sufficient to enable editing the config file. (Don't ask me how to type backslash...)


5

Another option I just used is to put the commands and password for WiFi in a text document on a USB drive. You can open the file and copy and paste as needed.


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