116

This no longer works since ssh is not enabled. Using only the laptop's screen and keyboard (both before and after installation), install and configuration for headless operation using SSH is possible using NOOBS (they call it "silent install"). It does not require a separate screen or keyboard/mouse. It does require an SD card reader on the laptop (built in ...


58

Take a look at the Raspberry Pi wiki on re-mapping the keyboard with Debian Squeeze: Re-mapping the keyboard with Debian Squeeze If different letters appear on-screen from that which you typed, you need to reconfigure you keyboard settings. In Debian, from a command line type: sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration Follow the prompts....


49

First thing to do: Open terminal Second you will need to update the repositories: sudo apt-get update An upgrade to the whole system isn't needed but it is recommended: sudo apt-get upgrade Now we can install the virtual keyboard: sudo apt-get install matchbox-keyboard Rebooting is recommended: sudo reboot Now you can access the keyboard: Menu >>...


48

You need to remap your keyboard. By default it is set to a UK map. at the command line type: sudo nano /etc/default/keyboard and hit enter. locate the following line XKBLAYOUT=”gb” Change the gb to us (This assumes you want a us mapping, if not replace the gb with the two letter code for your country) and reboot your machine. if it pauses for a ...


39

You need to reconfigure you keyboard mappings. At the command line type: sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration Follow the prompts. Then restart your RasPi. sudo reboot Or sudo nano /etc/default/keyboard find the line where it says XKBLAYOUT=”gb” and change the gb to the two letter code for your country (e.g. US). And restart your RasPi. If ...


23

Try pressing Ctrl+Alt+F1. This will switch you to a different tty. After logging in on this you can run commands as normal Any F key under 6 will do.


22

Steve's answer, though correct at the time, is now somewhat out of date. In Raspbian: sudo raspi-config and go to the configure_keyboard section with 4 Internationalisation Options -> I3 Change Keyboard Layout You can choose the correct keyboard type and layout from there.


20

I was able to get my Apple Wireless Keyboard and Magic Trackpad(without multitouch) working using the following steps: Packages & Tools You only really need to install the 'bluetooth' package but, I used the following command to install some test tools and the GUI Bluetooth manager: apt-get install bluetooth bluez blueman Edit (2015-12-20): the ...


20

On Raspbian, edit the file /etc/default/keyboard and then run sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration. You may have to restart your terminal and/or the Pi for everything to take effect. The particulars of what you need to enter depend on what you want to do. For me, this: XKBMODEL="pc105" XKBLAYOUT="us" XKBVARIANT="altgr-intl" XKBOPTIONS="terminate:...


20

run sudo raspi-config and setup your Locale and Keyboard. These are located under Internationalisation Options


14

There is a quick graphical way to change the keyboard layouts, the toggle key-combination and have a panel indicator at the same time. Right click on the panel and choose Add/Remove Panel Items Click Add Click 'Keyboard Layout Handler` Click Close Right click on the flag that appears on the panel Choose 'Keyboard Layout Handler Settings' Uncheck Keep system ...


11

What do you want to do with the RPi? You can run it with only a text console, and then you don't need a mouse, even if you still can use one. Just log in with the command sshor use the computer without installing or starting any X11 server or xdm program that starts a X11 server on your computer, like xdm, gdm or kdm does. You can still reach the computer ...


11

This sounds like a power problem. The Raspberry Pi can only supply a limited amount of current to the USB peripherals. Try connecting the peripherals through a USB powered hub.


11

You can use a great tool called x2x. This essentially treats the monitor connected to the remote device (the Raspberry Pi) as a second X screen to you existing session as if you had two monitors connected. Install x2x on both devices: sudo pacman -S x2x # Arch Linux sudo apt-get install x2x # Debian/Raspbian Configure SSH: On the Raspberry Pi ...


11

There is no easy or simple way to achieve what you ask. The simplest answer is just ignore this keyboard and get a USB one. However, if you really want to do it, it's a DIY job through and through. Your solution will be custom to this keyboard and may or may not be easily adapted to accommodate keyboards from other manufacturers. Laptop keyboard connectors ...


10

You can use VNC server on rarspberryPi and VNC clients on developers laptops. You can use tightvncserver package for this. In most typical setup, each client connecting to VNC will see exatcly the same screen, will control the same mouse pointer etc. I believe you would like to setup it so that every one that logs in gets his own individual screen. To ...


10

synergy can do this quite well Synergy lets you easily share your mouse and keyboard between multiple computers on your desk, and it's Free and Open Source. Just move your mouse off the edge of one computer's screen on to another. You can even share all of your clipboards. All you need is a network connection. Synergy is cross-platform (works on ...


10

Here is one thing to try out: Edit /etc/default/keyboard with your favorite editor (vim, nano,). Remember to use sudo: sudo nano /etc/default/keyboard Make the file look like this: # KEYBOARD CONFIGURATION FILE # Consult the keyboard(5) manual page. XKBMODEL="pc105" XKBLAYOUT="se" XKBVARIANT="" XKBOPTIONS="terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp" BACKSPACE="guess" ...


9

The short answer is, make sure you download the offline install version of NOOBS, then edit the file recovery.cmdline and add silentinstall on the end of the first line. That will auto install raspbian, and reboot into the desktop when finished.


8

I see the same problem with a Dell keyboard, and I believe it's down to the fact that the keyboard has a built-in USB hub. This is from the R-Pi Troubleshooting page at elinux.org: R-Pi does not respond to key presses / Keyboard randomly repeats key presses This is caused by inadequate power. Use a good power supply and a good power cable. Some ...


8

In my case, Raspbian (jessie): $ cat /etc/os-release PRETTY_NAME="Raspbian GNU/Linux 8 (jessie)" ... $ sudo vi ~/.config/lxkeymap.cfg option = ctrl:swapcaps or option = <something>,ctrl:swapcaps then $ sudo reboot ctrl:swapcaps swaps the Ctrl and CapsLock keys. If you'd like to just replace CapsLock and keep the original Ctrl as is, use ctrl:...


8

Is it possible to install and configure a Raspberry Pi without a wired keyboard or mouse? It should be. I've used a wireless keyboard/mouse combo with a USB dongle; that works out of the box with the linux kernel as configured on raspbian (and almost certainly other available systems too). Just don't get anything too wierd that requires special drivers or ...


7

The "stock" debian image (currently debian6-19-04-2012.img) works with my Logitech diNovo Edge Windows edition Bluetooth keyboard/trackpad combo. I loaded a new SD card using the command-line Linux instructions and no additional drivers or packages were required. Assuming the diNovo Edge, is a standard Bluetooth HID profile device then others should work ...


7

For a headless setup, SSH can be enabled by placing a file named ssh, without any extension, onto the boot partition of the SD card. When the Pi boots, it looks for the ssh file. If it is found, SSH is enabled, and the file is deleted. The content of the file does not matter: it could contain text, or nothing at all.


6

You could also run the Raspberry Pi as the wireless access point itself. All you need is a USB WiFi dongle (I used a RALINK RT5370). Instructions @ http://sirlagz.net/?p=589 Then use SSH or VNC as per above answer, I would recommend SSH myself as VNC with X and multiple sessions will probably bring the Pi to its knees very quickly


6

If you just want to make a keyboard, without using your Makey Makey, you can do that using the GPIO functionality of the Raspberry Pi. But like commented before, the Raspberry Pi does not have sufficient pins available to make a keyboard that is actually useful. However, if you are willing to add 2 IC's you can make yourself a keyboard with so much keys ...


6

I ran into this same issue and the second step of AndyD's reply to this question on the raspberrypi.org forum suggests an alternative to restarting. Use the command: $ sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration to reconfigure your keyboard. Choose English (US) for keyboard layout (second page of configuration). Then either reboot or $ invoke-...


6

Why not stop it with sudo /etc/init.d/lightdm stop


6

You could enable the ssh server, set the Pi up To have a fixed ip address, then just connect to the Pi with a newtork cable. An alternative to ssh would be vnc, so you could use a graphic ui This relies on the laptop working, but the programs will use very little memory, and probably no disk access, so slow will be fine Setting up ssh on the Pi has been ...


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